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Book Full text available online for free

Young people's mental health

Author:
YOUTH SELECT COMMITTEE
Publisher:
British Youth Council
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
40
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the findings from the Youth Select Committee’s inquiry into mental health services for young people. The committee consists of eleven people, aged 13-18 and includes both elected and reserved seats to ensure a broad representation of interests and experience from all parts of the UK. The report deals with the current state of service, levels of funding and changes to service provision. It looks at quality of education, training for teachers and the role of schools and explores awareness of mental health and digital culture. The report includes a set of key recommendations. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Improving psychiatric diagnosis in multidisciplinary child and adolescent mental health services

Authors:
MICHELSON Daniel, et al
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 35(12), December 2011, pp.454-459.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Obtaining an accurate clinic diagnosis is a critical process in mental healthcare pathways. This study was designed to develop and test a new one-day diagnostic training intervention for multidisciplinary practitioners (n=63) in out-patient child and adolescent mental health services. The authors examined learning outcomes, practice impacts and the implementation processes. The work was conducted in an inner London area where previous audits had revealed large inconsistencies in rates of recorded diagnoses. Training was viewed positively by most participants and was associated with significant increases in practitioner self-efficacy; this effect was sustained at 8-month follow-up. A comparative audit before and after training indicated that clinicians were significantly more likely to assign an Axis I diagnosis following the training intervention. However, absolute rates of Axis I classification remained relatively low (less than 40%) both before and after training. Practitioners were moderately successful at following through on personal plans for implementing new learning. Support for implementation within teams was inconsistent. The authors conclude that a brief training workshop may have some impact on practitioners’ behaviour so that diagnoses are made more promptly and appropriately recorded. However, they suggest that future workforce development initiatives should consider more comprehensive and diversified strategies, including targeted post-training support, if increased self-efficacy following training is to be translated into sustained changes in diagnostic practice.

Journal article

The Columbia Impairment Scale: factor analysis using a community mental health sample

Authors:
SINGER Jonathan B., EACK Shaun M., GREENO Catherine M.
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 21(4), July 2011, pp.458-468.
Publisher:
Sage

The accurate identification of functional impairment is a primary goal of epidemiologists, treatment development researchers, and clinicians. This study aimed to test the factor structure of the parent version of the Columbia Impairment Scale (CIS) in a sample of 280 mothers who brought their children for community mental health (CMH) services, in Pennsylvania, United States. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test the fit of the hypothesised four-factor structure and the empirically validated one-factor structure. Exploratory factor analysis was used to identify what factor structure best fit our sample of distressed mothers. Neither the one- nor the four-factor model fit our sample. The analysis suggested that the CIS was best understood as a 12-item, three-factor model that identified functional impairment: at school/work; in socialising; and at home/family. The authors concluded that these results question the validity of the parent version of the Columbia Impairment Scale in a community mental health sample of mothers and provides support for multidimensional measures of functional impairment.

Journal article

Specialist mental healthcare for children with epilepsy: child and adolescent mental health service liaison with neuroscience

Authors:
JOHNSTONE Ross J., MORTON Michael J. S.
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 33(10), October 2009, pp.384-386.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This paper presents a liaison model for the management of children with more complex epilepsy and psychiatric disorders. Services used by children with epilepsy were seen by a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS) liaison psychiatry team in the West of Scotland. Case notes of patients with epilepsy were reviewed to determine service involvement. The majority of patients attended joint psychiatry and neurology clinics. Recommendation made by the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) for the psychological management of children were found to have been met. Most patients had been assessed by a clinical psychologist and received educational psychology input and family treatment approaches, while half had social work involvement.

Journal article

How Baby Peter has changed everything

Author:
GILLEN Sally
Journal article citation:
Young Minds Magazine, 102, October 2009, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
YoungMinds

There has been an rise in the number of care proceedings since the Baby Peter case, which has resulted in an increased workload for social workers. As children in public care often have greater contact with a child mental health team, this article examines the possible impact on child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) teams. A short case study of the Newham Child and Family Consultation service is included.

Journal article

Children's mental health service use and maternal mental health: a path analytic model

Authors:
PFEFFERLE Susan G., SPITZNAGEL Edward L.
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 31(3), March 2009, pp.378-382.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Data from the 2002 National Survey of American Families were used to explore the relationship between past month maternal mental health and past year child mental health services use. Observations were limited to the 8072 most knowledgeable adults who were the mothers of target children aged 6–11. Results found multiple factors were associated with odds of any child mental health service use. In the path analytic model poor past month maternal mental health was associated with increased aggravation which in turn was associated with increased use of mental health visits. Negative child behaviours as reported by the mother were also associated with increased maternal aggravation and increased service use. Parental perception of child behaviours influences treatment seeking, both directly and indirectly through parental aggravation. Parental mental health influences tolerance for child behaviours. Findings are consistent with other studies. Interventions should address the entire family and their psychosocial circumstances through collaboration between multiple service sectors.

Journal article

Childhood mental disorders in Great Britain: an epidemiological perspective

Author:
MELTZER Howard
Journal article citation:
Child Care in Practice, 13(4), October 2007, pp.313-326.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The objective of this article is to describe the prevalence of childhood disorders and examine the factors associated with higher rates of disorder by combining the data from two large population-based samples of British children and young people aged 5-15. Just over 18,000 children were assessed in 1999 and 2004 using the Development and Well-Being Assessment, a structured interview with verbatim reports reviewed by clinicians so that information from parents, teachers and children is combined to produce national estimates of clinically recognisable disorders. The overall prevalence of childhood disorders was 9.5%. Factors which are independently associated with increased rates of childhood mental disorders ranged from characteristics of the child (age, sex, physical health problems, having poor scholastic achievement) to family characteristics (family structure, mother's psychological distress, poor family functioning) and household characteristics (tenure, type of accommodation and the working status of family). In conclusion, roughly one in 10 children have at least one ICD10 disorder, involving a significant level of distress or social impairment. Associations with child, family and household characteristics have implications for treatment strategies.

Journal article

“Care just changes your life”: factors impacting upon the mental health of children and young people with experiences of care in Northern Ireland

Authors:
MULLAN Christine, et al
Journal article citation:
Child Care in Practice, 13(4), October 2007, pp.417-434.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This paper represents one element of a research project carried out into the mental health needs of children and young people with experiences of care in Northern Ireland. Focusing exclusively on qualitative data collected from 51 young people in care and aftercare, it discusses in the first instance how the challenges and difficulties faced by young people can manifest themselves in feelings and behaviours that may exemplify poor mental well-being. In doing so it provides an understanding of mental health in the context of these young people's lives. Through offering a more detailed account of some of the specific issues that put these young people at increased risk, it highlights areas for further work and consideration as a means of protecting them against these risks. These include: dealing with experiences prior to care; easing and “normalising” the experience of living in care; and enhancing “safety nets” after care. A key objective of the research is to inform policy and practice through the accounts of children and young people. It is argued that more work needs to be done to find creative ways of enhancing the day-to-day experiences of young people while in care and when leaving care.

Journal article

Mental health problems among child welfare clients living at home

Author:
IVERSON Anette Christine
Journal article citation:
Child Care in Practice, 13(4), October 2007, pp.387-399.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The great majority of children receiving intervention from child welfare and protection services (CWS) in Norway live at home. The purpose of this study was to assess mental health problems among these children. Data stem from a population-based study, the Bergen child study, conducted in 2006. Of a sample consisting of 4,162 children in the fifth to seventh grades, 82 children were CWS clients who lived at home. Compared with their peers, the CWS children had significantly higher scores on emotional problems, hyperactivity, conduct problems, peer problems, and total difficulties (child and parent reports on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire). The relationship between being a CWS client and total difficulties remained significant when socio-demographic variables were controlled for. Even though the results indicate that child welfare clients have more contact with child and adolescent mental health service than earlier assumed, the results emphasise the need for strong collaboration between CWS and mental health services and the need for CWS to include other types of interventions in addition to financial support.

Book Full text available online for free

Regional reviews of tier 4 child and adolescent mental health services: summary and comment

Author:
KURTZ Zarrina
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership. Children, Young People and Families Programme
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
93p.
Place of publication:
London

In-patient care, provided at Tier 4 level, is a specialised field aimed at provision of high-quality care for young people with serious mental health problems. This report summarises analyses and comments upon the findings from Reviews of Tier 4 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS),undertaken during the past year or two, in the nine regions of England.

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