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Journal article

Animal insticts

Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September/October 2014, p.22.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Animals can have a positive impact on mental health. This article presents a brief case study of how owning a dog was able to help Tracey Doolan. Tracey was diagnosed with rheumatiod arthritis at 16, and also experienced mental health issues of post traumatic stress disorder and depression. Although her dog was intended to be a pet, and received no training, the dog was able to eventually help her with many tasks, as well as improving her physical and mental wellbeing. (Original abstract)

Journal article

Art for mental health's sake

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July 2007, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

In 2005 the Development for Culture, Media and Sport and the Department of Health jointly commissioned a study to contribute to the evidence base on the benefits for mental health of participation of arts work. This article reports findings from two key strands of the second phase of the research: an outcomes study providing quantitative evidence of the benefits of arts participation for people with mental health needs, and a series of qualitative case studies of six arts and mental health projects that explored how people benefited from arts participation.

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Being included in your community and getting the support that is right for you: ideas about ways the Local Area Co-ordination approach can support people in Scotland who have mental health problems

Author:
OUTSIDE THE BOX DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT
Publisher:
Outside the Box Development Support
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
28p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This report is a summary of the main points raised at two mental health workshops run by Outside the Box in August 20006 to look at how the approach which underpins Local Area Co-ordination could be used to support people. The report includes ideas about how people can take on this discussion in their areas.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Sorry, not my department

Author:
HOPKINS Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.05.06, 2006, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

This article looks at the case of a man with a chronic medical condition (psoriasis) which resulted in mental health problems. His multiple needs did not fit into any service category. A social worker tells the author how he tried to tailor a solution.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Who will believe him?

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 05.01.05, 2005, pp.38-39.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A man with poor mental health says he has been attacked. But staff must win his trust to find out the truth. A panel of experts give their assessment of the case.

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Case study: City and Hackney CAMHS extended service

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

A short case study describing the work of City and Hackney Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS). The service has extended their Tier 3 service provision to young people past the age of 18 years old who do not currently meet the criteria for Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS), but who are considered to require a mental health service. The case study outlines the background to the project, describes how the service was designed, how outcomes and impact of the service will be measured, and explains when the the service may be suitable to transferable to other settings. (Original abstract)

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Anti-social behaviour and mental health: a London Councils Member briefing

Author:
LONDON COUNCILS
Publisher:
London Councils
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
3
Place of publication:
London

Tackling anti-social behaviour (ASB) is a priority for many community safety partnerships in London. ASB is also one of the three priority areas of focus for the London Crime Reduction Board in 2014. Boroughs have consistently raised the point that a sizeable proportion of their ASB cases have a mental health dimension. Preventing and tackling ASB, and supporting people with mental health needs are two important areas of work for local authorities and their partners. Reducing crime and improving community safety are critical to London local government’s role in building and sustaining safe and prosperous communities. A key element of this is preventing and tackling ASB. London Councils conducted a survey of all heads of community safety in the 32 London boroughs and the City of London, to explore mental health and ASB issues and challenges, to find out what practical responses are delivering results, also what the professionals feel they need to improve work in this area. Seventeen boroughs responded, of which 15 completed the survey. This report uses survey responses to distinguish between instances where mental health issues apply in anti-social behaviour cases and those that fall below the Mental Health Act threshold. Identification of risk, vulnerability and support needs are also of key importance. The report presents case studies and examples of what works in particular boroughs’ practice. The survey found that well-developed systems for information sharing between London Crime Reduction Board partners and the boroughs is essential to effective working on ASB and mental health. Recommendations are made accordingly. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Cognitive behavioural therapy and the impact of internalised societal discourses in people with intellectual disabilities: a case example

Authors:
GERRY Louise, CRABTREE Jason
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 7(1), 2013, pp.59-65.
Publisher:
Emerald

Cognitive behaviour therapies (CBT) are being seen as the treatment of choice for people with intellectual disabilities. And, the authors suggest, as the focus of national services change, more people with learning disabilities are likely to access mainstream health services such as Improving Access to Psychological Therapies in which CBT is often the primary mode of therapy. With this in mind they describe a cautionary case that demonstrates some of the potential dilemmas and challenges that can be experienced when working with clients with intellectual disabilities. The challenges stem from using an approach that locates problems within people rather than as being generated and maintained through social relations and social discourses. The case describes work with Mark, a young man with intellectual disabilities who accessed services for support with his low mood. It appears from this case example that there is the potential for therapeutic techniques used in CBT to promote questions that invite, generate and reinforce feelings of incompetence and inability in people with intellectual disabilities. The authors discuss the use of narrative techniques as a means of avoiding locating the problem as being within clients with intellectual disabilities; the implications that this has for the use of CBT with this client group are considered.

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Direct payments in mental health: what are they being used for? 2

Author:
CARE SERVICES IMPROVEMENT PARTNERSHIP
Publisher:
Care Services Improvement Partnership
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London
Edition:
Rev. ed.

A selection of examples showing the ways in which direct payments can or are being used in place of mental health services in a number of local authorities. The examples have been drawn from reports, studies and those working with the direct payments element of the National Social Inclusion Programme.

Journal article

A social work perspective on the adjustment disorders

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, CORCORAN Jacqueline
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 9(1-6), 2011, pp.107-121.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The adjustment disorders represent a client's problematic reaction to an environmental stress rather than assuming an internal functioning deficit. As a sole diagnosis, they account for 5-21% of voluntary mental health client consultations. However, they are controversial because of their relative lack of diagnostic validity and reliability. They may also be overused by social workers to avoid stigmatising clients. The purpose of this article is to explore the suitability of the adjustment disorders as clinical diagnoses, and to provide, through 2 case illustrations, intervention guidelines for social workers. Both illustrations provide example of assessment questions, risk and resilience considerations, and procedures for goal setting and treatment planning. The article argues that these diagnoses represent consistency with social work professional values in their focus on the interaction between persons and their environments, and in calling specific attentions to stressors that can be addressed during the intervention process. Social workers should therefore be encouraged to use these diagnoses when appropriate.

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