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Journal article

The long route back to hospital

Author:
WHYTE A.
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 28.9.89, 1989, pp.23-25.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Looks a the disproportionate number of people from ethnic groups who fall foul of the mental health legislation.

Journal article

Responding to need

Author:
HOLMES H.
Journal article citation:
Social Services Insight, 22.11.88, 1988, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Reed Business Publishing

How a rate capped borough can respond to the needs of the mentally ill people in its multi-ethnic community.

Book

Mental health services in a multi-racial society

Author:
MIND
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
1986
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional help for mental illness: a UK Arab perspective

Authors:
HAMID Aseel, FURNHAM Adrian
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 16(7), 2013, pp.741-758.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study examined various factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional psychological help (ATSPPH) in Arabs living in the UK: causal beliefs, shame-focused attitudes, confidentiality concerns, ethnic identity and demographic variables. Participants completed an online questionnaire and results indicated that Arabs showed significantly less positive ATSPPH and had stronger causal beliefs in supernatural and non-Western physiology than British Caucasians. Confidentiality concerns, but not shame-focused attitudes were significant predictors of ATSPPH; confidentiality concerns were more significant for Arabs than for British Caucasians. Implications are drawn from the results. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Impact of welfare reforms on minority ethnic communities

Author:
FAITHFUL Lesley
Journal article citation:
Open Mind, 164, January 2011, pp.6-7.
Publisher:
MIND

People with mental health support needs from black and minority ethnic communities are likely to face additional difficulties claiming Disability Living Allowance (DLA) in the context of new reforms. A short case study highlights these difficulties which include languages issues, lack of familiarity with psychiatric terminology and difficulties in accessing culturally appropriate support services.

Book Full text available online for free

Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use

Authors:
SYKES Wendy, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Home Office
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

This report describes the findings from a study exploring the perceived social harms associated with the use of khat (a vegetable stimulant grown and used in the countries of East Africa and the Middle East and available through a variety of outlets in the UK). The study comprised focus groups and interviews with: members of the Somali, Yemeni and Ethiopian communities; members of the wider community; and practitioners including those from health, education and enforcement fields. In addition, a short survey of Drug Action Teams was conducted to gauge the availability of treatment service provision for khat users. Findings showed that khat was used all three communities and considered by users, non-users and many practitioners to be a normal, socially accepted practice, cutting across the social spectrum. Heavy khat use was perceived as problematic. Perceptions of the harms associated with khat included harm to: physical and mental health; work and finances; and relationships, marriage and family life.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Positive responses to need

Author:
KNAPP Martin
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 28.10.10, 2010, p.30.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Briefly reports on the findings of recent mental health research. Research covering debt and mental health; and links between mental health and ethnicity.

Book Full text available online for free

Summary report: Wellness recovery action plan (WRAP) training for BME women: an independent evaluation

Authors:
GORDON Jacki, CASSIDY Jan
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This is a summary report on an independent evaluation of Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) training delivered to a group of seven black and minority ethnic (BME) women, most of who were South Asian. This evaluation was commissioned by the Scottish Recovery Network as part of its wider strategic activity in promoting and supporting recovery and to inform its roll out of WRAP to BME communities, as well as more generally.

Book Full text available online for free

Wellness recovery action plan (WRAP) training for BME women: an evaluation of process, cultural appropriateness and effectiveness

Authors:
GORDON Jacki, CASSIDY Jan
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
58p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This is a report on an independent evaluation of Wellness Recovery Action Planning (WRAP) training delivered to a group of BME women in Glasgow. This evaluation was commissioned by the Scottish Recovery Network (SRN) as part of its wider strategic activity in promoting and supporting recovery.

Journal article

An exploration of mental health literacy among African American clergy

Authors:
STANSBURY Kim, SCHUMACHER Mitzi
Journal article citation:
Journal of Gerontological Social Work, 51(1/2), 2008, pp.126-142.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Using a grounded theory approach, a purposive sample of nine African American clergy was recruited to represent diverse ages, denominations, locations (urban/rural) and educational levels. Interview data on mental health issues was coded and classified according to Kevin’s (1976) typology of pastoral counselling and Jorm et al’s (1997) conceptual model of mental health literacy. The findings show that the respondents were adherents of Kevin’s Religious-Community model. However, other findings also partially map on to Jorm et al’s conceptual model. These cover awareness of loss of cognitive function, psychosocial stressors in older age, religiosity as a self-help intervention, appreciation (by the respondent) of the help available from mental health professionals, awareness of ongoing stigma in relation to mental illness, and ability to find mental health information. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street,  Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

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