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Journal article Full text available online for free

La belle indifférence in conversion symptoms and hysteria: systematic review

Authors:
STONE Jon, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 188(3), March 2006, pp.204-209.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

La belle indifférence refers to an apparent lack of concern shown by some patients towards their symptoms. It is often regarded as typical of conversion symptoms/hysteria. This review aims to determine the frequency of la belle indifférence in studies of patients with conversion symptoms/hysteria and to determine whether it discriminates between conversion symptoms and symptoms attributable to organic disease. A systematic review of all studies published since 1965 that have reported rates of la belle indifférence in patients with conversion symptoms and/or patients with organic disease. A total of 11 studies were eligible for inclusion. The median frequency of la belle indifférence was 21% in 356 patients with conversion symptoms, and 29% in 157 patients with organic disease. The available evidence does not support the use of la belle indifférence to discriminate between conversion symptoms and symptoms of organic disease. The quality of the published studies is poor, with a lack of operational definitions and masked ratings. La belle indifférence should be abandoned as a clinical sign until both its definition and its utility have been clarified.

Journal article

Predictors of perceptions of mental illness and averseness to help: a survey of elite football players

Author:
JONES Tiffanie-Victoria
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.422-427.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Hypermasculinity may impact elite football players’ willingness to seek help for mental health problems. Aims: This quantitative study sought to identify what set of characteristics, including hypermasculinity, best predicts elite football players’ mental health attitudes. Method: The Attitude Scale for Mental Illness, Inventory of Attitudes toward Seeking Mental Health Services, and Athlete’s Perception of Masculinity Scale were self-administered to 112 football players from the NFLPA and the Washington, DC metro area. Results: Canonical correlation analysis was used to develop a regression model that best predicts elite football players’ mental health attitudes. This study found that though the athletes have high levels of hypermasculinity, other factors, including marital status and sport level lessen the effects of hypermasculinity and facilitate positive perceptions of mental illness and receptivity to help. Conclusions: Predictors suggest that therapeutic efforts targeted toward family and support networks, as well as intervention strategies for decreasing mental illness stigma are essential to encourage positive mental health attitudes in elite football players. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Physical activity preferences, motivators, barriers and attitudes of adults with mental illness

Authors:
CHAPMAN Justin J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.448-454.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Adults with mental illness may have specific attitudes toward physical activity (PA). Aims: To assess the PA attitudes of non-institutionalised adults with mental illness, and associations with psychological distress. Method: Participants completed questionnaires on activity preferences (type, context and sources of support), motivators, barriers and attitudes toward personal training (PT). Relationships between responses and distress were assessed using logistic regressions. Results: One-hundred forty-two participants completed the questionnaires. PA context preferences included activities done close to home, outdoors, with professional instruction, with people of the same ability, as part of a healthy lifestyle program and with a social component. The most commonly endorsed source of support was an exercise instructor. Most respondents had never received PT; however, PT had high acceptability. Common barriers included poor physical and mental health, and lack of money. Distress was positively associated with barriers of poor mental health, tiredness, disorganisation, exhaustion and being shy/embarrassed. Conclusions: Local outdoor walking groups that include social and healthy lifestyle components, and that are led by an exercise instructor who can provide support for overcoming barriers, may best meet PA interests of this group. PT could be an acceptable method for offering individualised support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional help for mental illness: a UK Arab perspective

Authors:
HAMID Aseel, FURNHAM Adrian
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 16(7), 2013, pp.741-758.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study examined various factors affecting attitude towards seeking professional psychological help (ATSPPH) in Arabs living in the UK: causal beliefs, shame-focused attitudes, confidentiality concerns, ethnic identity and demographic variables. Participants completed an online questionnaire and results indicated that Arabs showed significantly less positive ATSPPH and had stronger causal beliefs in supernatural and non-Western physiology than British Caucasians. Confidentiality concerns, but not shame-focused attitudes were significant predictors of ATSPPH; confidentiality concerns were more significant for Arabs than for British Caucasians. Implications are drawn from the results. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Emotional intelligence in siblings of patients diagnosed with a mental disorder

Authors:
SANDERS Avihay, SZYMANSKI Kate
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 10(4), November 2012, pp.331-342.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study investigated the ability of siblings of patients diagnosed with a mental disorder on a measure of emotional intelligence, the Mayer–Salovey–Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Thirty siblings of patients diagnosed with a mental disorder by a mental health professional completed the MSCEIT. Their performance was compared against the population mean of 100 on different abilities of emotional intelligence. Siblings performed statistically better than the population on Experiential EIQ, the ability to perceive, to respond, and to manipulate emotional input without necessarily understanding it, and statistically worse than the population mean on Strategic EIQ, the ability to understand and manage emotions without necessarily perceiving or fully experiencing them. Experiential EIQ appears to be a strength, while Strategic EIQ appears to be a weakness for siblings. Implications for practice are presented.

Book

Fiction's madness

Author:
CLARKE Liam
Publisher:
PCCS Books
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
232p.
Place of publication:
Ross-on-Wye

Nine books of fiction and two Shakespearean plays are examined to explore the nature of madness. The examination aims is to increase understanding and better inform attitudes and beliefs about mental distress. It provides a wealth of theory and issues for reflection. Fictional works discussed include: Shakespeare’s Richard III and Macbeth; Regeneration by Pat Barker; Jake's Think by Kingsley Amis; Steppenwolf by Hermann Hesse; and Asylum by Patrick McGrath. Ten discussion papers also accompany the main chapters. It offers useful supplementary reading for those working in clinical psychology, psychiatric nursing, counselling, psychotherapy, psychiatry and social work.

Journal article

Adolescent co-occurring disorders treatment: clinicians' attitudes, values, and knowledge

Authors:
DENBY Ramona W., BRINSON Jesse A., AYALA Jessica
Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Services, 32(1), January 2011, pp.56-74.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In the United States, over 1 million young people are in contact with the youth justice system. Eighty per cent of these are estimated to have some form of mental health disorder. To effectively intervene, youth justice workers must be able to detect such disorders, along with substance misuse. This study investigated 294 community-based clinicians’ attitudes, experiences, values, and knowledge relating to issues of co-occurring disorders, within the youth justice system. Findings indicated that clinicians self-rate their clinical values and attitudes at or above the expected level of competency, but they acknowledged that their skill and knowledge levels were not adequate. Comparison measures reveal that employment setting conditions, geographic region, hours worked per week, and strongly held convictions about the importance of integrated mental health and substance use disorders service delivery distinguish clinicians’ co-occurring disorders knowledge levels. Implications for practice are discussed.

Journal article

Development of the illness perception questionnaire mental health

Authors:
WITTEMAN Cilia, BOLKS Lisabeth, HUTSCHEMAEKERS Giel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 20(2), 2011, pp.115-125.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

It has been shown that influencing patients’ negative  perceptions of their illnesses is conductive to recovery and effective coping with the illness. This article considers the effect of clients’ problem perceptions in mental health care, and describes the development of a brief instrument to chart the experience of clients with psychological problems. The aim of the study was to develop a concise general version of the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R),  a questionnaire originally developed for somatic illness, to assess how clients experience their mental health problems. The IPQ-R was adapted to psychological complaints; in particular adaptations were required to the scales that assess clients' perceptions of what their problem actually is, and what its causes are. The adapted instrument, the IPQ-Mental Health (IPQ-MH), consists of 3 parts: the identity scale; the structure scale; and the cause scale. The IPQ-MH was administered to 274 mental health clients, and psychometric analyses subsequently performed over the scores. The results showed that the identity scale of the IPQ-MH differentiates different clients, and the cause scale reliably measures clients' attributions of causes to their mental problems. The structure scale of the IPQ-MH replicates that of the original IPQ-R. The article concludes that the IPQ-MH can reliably assess clients' mental health problem perceptions.

Book Full text available online for free

Well? What do you think? (2008): The fourth national Scottish survey of public attitudes to mental wellbeing and mental health problems

Authors:
DAVIDSON Sara, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
175p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The overall aims of the research were to examine the views and experiences of a representative sample of the adult Scottish population (reflecting age, gender, income, location, race and ethnic diversity) in relation to a spectrum of mental health-related issues; and to compare findings with other relevant survey data. The specific objectives of the research were to investigate people’s perceptions of their own general health and lifestyle, and to explore people’s understanding of mental wellbeing and mental health problems, and their understanding of factors affecting these, investigate people’s direct experience of mental health problems and recovery from mental health problems, investigate people’s sources of information on mental health problems, explore people’s attitudes to mental health problems, including the stereotypes and myths, explore people’s attitudes to those who experience specific symptoms of mental health problems,  compare findings with the 2002, 2004 and 2006 surveys and, as far as data are comparable, with findings from similar surveys carried out in Scotland, in other parts of the UK and internationally. The survey was conducted among a random sample of 1,177 Scottish adults (aged 16+) between 14 November 2008 and 19 March 2009. All interviews were conducted face-to-face in respondents’ homes.

Book Full text available online for free

Well? What do you think? (2008): The fourth national Scottish survey of public attitudes to mental wellbeing and mental health problems

Authors:
DAVIDSON Sara, et al
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government Social Research
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

To help inform the work of the National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Wellbeing, and provide relevant baseline data, the then Scottish Executive commissioned the first Well? What do you think? survey in 2002. The survey was repeated in 2004 and 2006, with minor changes made to the questionnaire on each occasion. In 2008, the Scottish Government commissioned Ipsos MORI to undertake the fourth survey. The survey was conducted among a representative sample of 1,177 adults aged 16+ in Scotland. Main findings are presented.

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