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Journal article

Affective disorders, anxiety disorders and the risk of alcohol dependence and misuse

Authors:
LIANG Wenbin, CHIKRITZHS Tanya
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 199(3), September 2011, pp.219-224.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

It remains unclear whether affective disorders and anxiety disorders increase the risk of alcohol dependence and alcohol misuse. This retrospective cohort study is based on data collected from the 2007 Australia Mental Health and Well-Being survey. Both Poisson and logistic regression models were used for multivariate analysis. There were 8841 participants in the MHW study of whom 342 had received a diagnosis of alcohol dependence at some time prior to the start of the study; full data was available and analysed for 336. Those with affective and anxiety disorders appeared to be at higher risk of alcohol misuse or dependence. For affective disorders the relative risk of alcohol dependence within five years was 5.46; for anxiety disorders it was 3.33. The authors conclude that common affective disorders and anxiety disorders may increase the risk of alcohol dependence and alcohol misuse among the Australian population.

Journal article

Brief report: excessive alcohol use negatively affects the course of adolescent depression: one year naturalistic follow-up study

Authors:
MERIRINNE Esa, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adolescence, 33(1), February 2010, pp.221-226.
Publisher:
Academic Press

In this study, the researchers aimed to clarify the impact of the core alcohol use phenomenon of drunkenness-oriented drinking, in terms of weekly drunkenness, on the course of adolescent unipolar depression and psychosocial functioning, in a 1 year follow-up study of depressed adolescent patients referred from schools, health care centres and social and family counselling services to adolescent psychiatric outpatient clinics in Finland. The authors conclude that excessive alcohol use (defined as weekly drunkenness) seems to negatively affect the course of depressive symptoms and, even after a year, psychosocial functioning, and that treatments designed to reduce alcohol use seem to be justified along with depression treatment, but that intervention studies are needed to evaluate the best approach.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Mental health consequences of overstretch in the UK armed forces

Authors:
RONA Roberto J., et al
Journal article citation:
British Medical Journal, 22.09.07, 2007, pp.603-607.
Publisher:
British Medical Association

This study aimed to assess the relation between frequency and duration of deployment of UK armed forces personnel on mental health. Operational history in past three years of a randomly chosen stratified sample of 5547 regulars with experience of deployment was used in the study. Main outcome measures were psychological distress (general health questionnaire-12), caseness for post-traumatic stress disorder, physical symptoms, and alcohol use (alcohol use disorders identification test). Results found personnel who were deployed for 13 months or more in the past three years were more likely to fulfil the criteria for post-traumatic stress disorder, show caseness on the general health questionnaire, and have multiple physical symptoms. A significant association was found between duration of deployment and severe alcohol problems. Exposure to combat partly accounted for these associations. The associations between number of deployments in the past three years and mental disorders were less consistent than those related to duration of deployment. Post-traumatic stress disorder was also associated with a mismatch between expectations about the duration of deployment and the reality. The authors conclude a clear and explicit policy on the duration of each deployment of armed forces personnel may reduce the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder. An association was found between deployment for more than a year in the past three years and mental health that might be explained by exposure to combat.

Book

Alcohol and other drug misuse

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
10p.
Place of publication:
London

Part of a series of booklets describing a range of mental health and other problems, aiming to make people more understanding of what these are and of the people who suffer from them. This pamphlet looks at alcohol and other drug misuse.

Journal article

Adult adjustment problems of separated children: a longitudinal study from birth to the age of 23 years

Authors:
BERMAN L.R., WANGBY M.
Journal article citation:
Scandinavian Journal of Social Welfare, 2(1), January 1993, pp.10-16.
Publisher:
Munksgaard/ Blackwell

The study investigated the risk of adult criminality, alcohol abuse and mental health problems (between 18 and 23 years of age) that were associated with a) the number of separations to which a child had been subjected, b) age at separation and c) the sex of the child. Data were used from a Swedish longitudinal study of a large representative sample.

Journal article

Alcoholism and coexisting psychiatric disorders

Author:
MULINSKI Paul
Journal article citation:
Social Casework, 69(3), March 1988, pp.141-146.
Publisher:
Alliance for Children and Families

Stresses the importance of treating both problems at the same time.

Journal article

A longitudinal study of financial difficulties and mental health in a national sample of British undergraduate students

Authors:
RICHARDSON Thomas, et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 53(3), 2017, pp.344-352.
Publisher:
Springer

Previous research has shown a relationship between financial difficulties and poor mental health in students, but most research is cross-sectional. To examine longitudinal relationships over time between financial variables and mental health in students. A national sample of 454 first year British undergraduate students completed measures of mental health and financial variables at up to four time points across a year. Cross-sectional relationships were found between poorer mental health and female gender, having a disability and non-white ethnicity. Greater financial difficulties predicted greater depression and stress cross-sectionally, and also predicted poorer anxiety, global mental health and alcohol dependence over time. Depression worsened over time for those who had considered abandoning studies or not coming to university for financial reasons, and there were effects for how students viewed their student loan. Anxiety and alcohol dependence also predicted worsening financial situation suggesting a bi-directional relationship. Financial difficulties appear to lead to poor mental health in students with the possibility of a vicious cycle occurring. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A preliminary investigation of the relationship between emotion dysregulation and partner violence perpetration among individuals with PTSD and alcohol dependence

Authors:
WATKINS Laura E., SCHUMACHER Julie A., COFFEY Scott F.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aggression Maltreatment and Trauma, 25(3), 2016, pp.305-314.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This study examines the link between emotion dysregulation and intimate partner violence (IPV) among 77 individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol dependence. Participants were recruited from a residential substance abuse treatment programme as part of the eligibility screening for an institutional review board approved clinical trial examining the efficacy of an exposure-based intervention in individuals dually diagnosed with alcohol dependence and PTSD. Participants reported on PTSD symptoms, alcohol use disorder symptoms, emotion dysregulation, and physical and verbal aggression in their intimate relationships during the past year. Findings demonstrated that difficulties with emotion regulation are associated with physical and verbal IPV perpetration in a clinical sample. Although facets of emotion regulation emerged as significant predictors of IPV in the models, alcohol and PTSD symptom severity did not emerge as predictors of IPV. These findings suggest targeted emotion regulation skills training could benefit substance abusers who engage in IPV and that emotion dysregulation might be an important target for future research aimed at understanding elevated rates of IPV perpetration in mental health samples. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

A comparison of substance abuse severity among homeless and non-homeless adults

Author:
HUNTLEY Sylvia S.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment, 25(4), 2015, pp.312-321.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This study aimed to determine whether mental health status and being homeless were significant predicators of substance abuse severity among adults and to determine whether mental health status was a significant predictor of substance abuse severity among adults over and above homeless status. Data were collected from 60 individuals from the Baltimore metropolitan area in the United States. Thirty individuals were homeless and attended a breakfast program; 30 individuals were residents of a community in close proximity to the program. Modes of measurement consisted of the Addiction Severity Index Self Report Form and the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Data for this study were coded numerically and analysed using multiple regression analysis. Results revealed that housing status was a significant predictor of alcohol abuse and that mental health status was not a significant predicator of substance abuse severity over and above homeless status. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

A novel treatment resource for co-occurring symptoms

Authors:
McCALLUM Stacey L., et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 6(4), 2013, pp.155-167.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper describes the development of a self-directed treatment tool which uses cognitive behavioural therapy techniques to reduce anxiety symptoms in patients seeking treatment for alcohol-related problems. The booklet was formatted for the patients to completed over four weeks, with each week targeting a different CBT technique. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 patients presenting to hospital for alcohol related problems and 10 practitioners working at inpatient, outpatient and residential treatment facilities in Adelaide, South Australia. The majority of patients (80 percent) and practitioners (90 percent) felt the booklet was a practical, usable educational resource for patients sufferening from co-occuring anxiety symptoms in substance abuse facilities. Participants also outlined the limitations of the resource. It was suggested that the booklet would be most suitable for patients with moderate to high cognitive ability, who also exhibit a motivation to change alcohol consumption and have access to additional support. Findings suggest suggest that the booklet may be most useful for improving treatment accessibility and treatment seeking behaviours, rather than reducing practitioner-patient contact. (Edited publisher abstract)

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