Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 2 of 2

Journal article

Psychiatric disorders among older prisoners: a systematic review and comparison study against older people in the community

Authors:
DI LORITO Claudio, VOLLM Birgit, DENING Tom
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 22(1), 2018, pp.1-10.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Objectives: Despite emerging evidence that older prisoners experience poor mental health, literature in this area is still limited. In the present systematic review and meta-analysis, the authors report on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among older prisoners and compare their findings against community studies on older people. Methods:The authors searched on Assia, PsycInfo, MedLine, Embase, Web of Science, Google and Gov.uk. They carried out bias assessments, rated studies for quality and ran a heterogeneity test. They meta-analysed prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders through an aggregate weighted mean and calculated relative risk (RR) and statistical significance against community studies. Sensitivity analyses were further performed. Results: They reviewed nine studies and obtained the following prevalence: ‘Any psychiatric disorder’ 38.4%, depression 28.3%, schizophrenia/psychoses 5.5%, bipolar disorder 4.5%, dementia 3.3%, cognitive impairment 11.8%, personality disorder 22.9%, alcohol abuse 15.9%, anxiety disorders 14.2%, PTSD 6.2%. Older prisoners were found to have higher RR for every single psychiatric disorder against older people in the community, with the sole exception of alcohol abuse (RR = 1) and dementia (RR = .75). The prevalence rates were statistically significantly higher (p < .05) among the prisoners for ‘Any psychiatric disorder’, depression and personality disorder. Overall, the sensitivity analyses confirmed our original results. Conclusion: The findings point at a high prevalence of every single psychiatric disorder among older prisoners, who also experience rates of dementia and alcohol abuse comparable to those reported in the community. The results have relevant implications for policy and practice in this area. Further research is crucial to confirm findings from this study. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Characteristics of double care demanding patients in a mental health care setting and a nursing home setting: results from the SpeCIMeN study

Authors:
COLLET Janine, et al
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 22(1), 2018, pp.333-39.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Background: Older patients suffering from a combination of psychiatric disorders and physical illnesses and/or dementia are called Double Care Demanding patients (DCDs). Special wards for DCDs within Dutch nursing homes (NHs) and mental health care institutions (MHCIs) offer a unique opportunity to obtain insight into the characteristics and needs of this challenging population. Methods: This observational cross-sectional study collected data from 163 DCDs admitted to either a NH or a MHCI providing specialised care for DCDs. Similarities and differences between both DCD groups are described. Results: Neuropsychiatric symptoms were highly prevalent in all DCDs but significantly more in MHCI-DCDs. Cognitive disorders were far more present in NH-DCDs, while MHCI-DCDs often suffered from multiple psychiatric disorders. The severity of comorbidities and care dependency were equally high among all DCDs. NH-DCDs expressed more satisfaction in overall quality of life. Conclusions: The institutionalised elderly DCD population is very heterogeneous. Specific care arrangements are necessary because the severity of a patient's physical illness and the level of functional impairment seem to be equally important as the patient's behavioural, psychiatric and social problems. Further research should assess the adequacy of the setting assignment and the professional skills needed to provide adequate care for elderly DCDs. (Publisher abstract)

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts