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Journal article

The post(hu)man always rings twice: theorising the difference of impairment in the lives of people with ‘mental health problems’

Authors:
VANDEKINDEREN Caroline, ROETS Griet
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 31(1), 2016, pp.33-46.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

A vital debate in British disability studies concerns the question of how impairment can be theorised, taking place between those who claim a critical realist ontology and those who argue for a critical social ontology. Recently, this discussion on impairment issues seems to merge with the agenda of the newly emerging perspective of critical disability studies. In contrast to the recent claim of Vehmas and Watson in Disability & Society that critical disability theorists only engage in a relativistic deconstruction of impairment, as critical disability scholars the authors explore the recent work of Braidotti who addresses a difference between a deconstructive anti-humanist stance and an affirmative post-humanist turn. Inspired by our empirical research, the authors theorise the difference of impairment in the lives of people with ‘mental health problems’ that can imply, in theoretical and in practical real-life terms, both a limitation and a potential that matters (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Scoping review of interventions supporting mothers with mental illness: key outcomes and challenges

Authors:
SUAREZ Eliana Barrios, LAFRENIERE Ginette, HARRISON Jay
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 52(8), 2016, pp.927-936.
Publisher:
Springer

Despite the fact that more than 60 per cent of women experiencing mental distress also care for dependent children, little is known about the efficacy of interventions supporting parents with mental illness. A scoping review of the literature published between 1997 and 2014 was conducted to obtain an overview of empirically evaluated interventions and to typify their outcomes. The review identified 19 publications reporting on 9 interventions. The efficacy of programs was apparent and key components used by programs were recognised. To enhance the well-being of mothers with mental illness and their children an increased knowledge transfer in this field is required. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Reflections on the social model of distress or madness: how to make the social model of disability accessible to people with mental health challenges

Author:
KINN Angela
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(4), 2016, pp.231-237.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between recovery approaches and the social model of disability developed within the broader disability movement. Design/methodology/approach: Personal narrative and reflective account written from the perspective of a senior peer trainer with reference to selected literature. Findings: It is important to embrace a social model and rights-based approach within recovery approaches. Originality/value: An original viewpoint on the perspective of a peer trainer linking recovery approaches to the social model and rights-based approach developed within the broader disability arena. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Predictors of perceptions of mental illness and averseness to help: a survey of elite football players

Author:
JONES Tiffanie-Victoria
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.422-427.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Hypermasculinity may impact elite football players’ willingness to seek help for mental health problems. Aims: This quantitative study sought to identify what set of characteristics, including hypermasculinity, best predicts elite football players’ mental health attitudes. Method: The Attitude Scale for Mental Illness, Inventory of Attitudes toward Seeking Mental Health Services, and Athlete’s Perception of Masculinity Scale were self-administered to 112 football players from the NFLPA and the Washington, DC metro area. Results: Canonical correlation analysis was used to develop a regression model that best predicts elite football players’ mental health attitudes. This study found that though the athletes have high levels of hypermasculinity, other factors, including marital status and sport level lessen the effects of hypermasculinity and facilitate positive perceptions of mental illness and receptivity to help. Conclusions: Predictors suggest that therapeutic efforts targeted toward family and support networks, as well as intervention strategies for decreasing mental illness stigma are essential to encourage positive mental health attitudes in elite football players. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Transportations of space, time and self: the role of reading groups in managing mental distress in the community

Authors:
SHIPMAN Judith, McGRATH Laura
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.416-421.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: The practice of reading and discussing literature in groups is long established, stretching back into classical antiquity. Although benefits of therapeutic reading groups have been highlighted, research into participants’ perceptions of these groups has been limited. Aims: To explore the experiences of those attending therapeutic reading groups, considering the role of both the group, and the literature itself, in participants’ ongoing experiences of distress. Method: Eleven participants were recruited from two reading groups in the South-East of England. One focus group was run, and eight individuals self-selected for individual interviews. The data were analysed together using a thematic analysis drawing on dialogical theories. Results: Participants described the group as an anchor, which enabled them to use fiction to facilitate the discussion of difficult emotional topics, without referring directly to personal experience. Two aspects of this process are explored in detail: the use of narratives as transportation, helping to mitigate the intensity of distress; and using fiction to explore possibilities, alternative selves and lives. Conclusions: For those who are interested and able, reading groups offer a relatively de-stigmatised route to exploring and mediating experiences of distress. Implications in the present UK funding environment are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Physical activity preferences, motivators, barriers and attitudes of adults with mental illness

Authors:
CHAPMAN Justin J., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.448-454.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Adults with mental illness may have specific attitudes toward physical activity (PA). Aims: To assess the PA attitudes of non-institutionalised adults with mental illness, and associations with psychological distress. Method: Participants completed questionnaires on activity preferences (type, context and sources of support), motivators, barriers and attitudes toward personal training (PT). Relationships between responses and distress were assessed using logistic regressions. Results: One-hundred forty-two participants completed the questionnaires. PA context preferences included activities done close to home, outdoors, with professional instruction, with people of the same ability, as part of a healthy lifestyle program and with a social component. The most commonly endorsed source of support was an exercise instructor. Most respondents had never received PT; however, PT had high acceptability. Common barriers included poor physical and mental health, and lack of money. Distress was positively associated with barriers of poor mental health, tiredness, disorganisation, exhaustion and being shy/embarrassed. Conclusions: Local outdoor walking groups that include social and healthy lifestyle components, and that are led by an exercise instructor who can provide support for overcoming barriers, may best meet PA interests of this group. PT could be an acceptable method for offering individualised support. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Trauma and young offenders: a review of the research and practice literature: research summary

Authors:
LIDDLE Mark, et al
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Reports on findings from a review of research and practice literature concerning trauma in the backgrounds of young offenders. It aims to highlight what is currently known about trauma within the population of young offenders, and to identify the importance of this knowledge for effective resettlement practice. Searches were carried out using the internet and academic databases, focusing on young people up to the age of 25. The review focuses on: definitions of trauma and the different ways in which trauma has been understood in the research and practice literature; the prevalence of different types of traumatic childhood and adolescent experiences in the backgrounds of young offenders; the effects that such trauma can have on young people in the short-term, and its longer term impacts on emotional, social, and neurological development; the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour, including the extent of their capacity to comply with youth justice interventions. The evidence suggests that offenders have a disproportionate amount of childhood and adolescent trauma in their backgrounds and that some of the impacts of such trauma appear to be linked to offending behaviour. It also looks at the implications that an understanding of trauma and its effects might have for resettlement work undertaken with young custody-leavers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Young offenders and trauma: experience and impact. A practitioners guide.

Authors:
WRIGHT Sam, LIDDLE Mark, GOODFELLOW Pippa
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This practitioner briefing aims to highlight what is currently known about the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour and development. Traumatic experiences very common in the backgrounds of young offenders and but the impact of these experiences can limit their ability to engage with opportunities and can seriously narrow their life chances. It is therefore critical that resettlement practitioners are aware of issues concerning trauma because attempting to address behaviour without understanding a young person’s underlying difficulties can result in unsuccessful and sometimes counterproductive interventions. The briefing considers the type of events that can cause trauma, the impact trauma can have, presents data to show the greater prevalence of mental health conditions and related issues such as substance dependency offenders; and looks at what this means for resettlement practice with young offenders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, mental capacity and human rights: a practitioner’s guide

Author:
BRITISH INSTITUTE OF HUMAN RIGHTS
Publisher:
British Institute of Human Rights
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
28
Place of publication:
London

This booklet provides information about human rights values and approaches for practitioners working in services supporting people with mental health or mental capacity issues. It looks at how the Human Rights Act work, legal duties under the Human Rights Act, and provides information about the key rights which are most relevant to practice in mental health and/or mental capacity settings. Human rights discussed include: right to life; right not to be tortured or treated in an inhuman or degrading way; right to liberty; right to respect for private and family life, home and correspondence; and right not be discriminated against in relation to any of the human rights. For each human right, the booklet outlines how practitioners might encounter this rights in their work, their practitioner duties, whether practitioners are able to restrict this right, and provides a short example. The booklet also includes a flowchart to help identify human rights issues in practice. It is the first of eight booklets developed as part of the British Institute of Human Rights (BIHR) project ‘Delivering Compassionate Care: Connecting Human Rights to the Frontline’, which aims to ensure that staff have the knowledge and skills uphold the dignity and human rights of the people using their services. It has been produced alongside seven issue-specific resources. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors associated with experienced discrimination among people using mental health services in England

Authors:
HAMILTON S., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(4), 2016, pp.350-358.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Research has found considerable variation in how far individuals with a diagnosis of mental illness experience discrimination. Aims: This study tested four hypotheses: (i) a diagnosis of schizophrenia will be associated with more discrimination than depression, anxiety or bipolar disorder; (ii) people with a history of involuntary treatment will report more discrimination than people without; (iii) higher levels of avoidance behaviour due to anticipated discrimination will be associated with higher levels of discrimination and (iv) longer time in contact with services will be associated with higher levels of discrimination. Method: Three thousand five hundred and seventy-nine people using mental health services in England took part in structured telephone interviews about discrimination experiences. Results: A multiple regression model found that study year, age, employment status, length of time in mental health services, disagreeing with the diagnosis, anticipating discrimination in personal relationships and feeling the need to conceal a diagnosis from others were significantly associated with higher levels of experienced discrimination. Conclusion: Findings suggest that discrimination is not related to specific diagnoses but rather is associated with mental health problems generally. An association between unemployment and discrimination may indicate that employment protects against experiences of discrimination, supporting efforts to improve access to employment among people with a diagnosis of mental illness. (Publisher abstract)

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