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Journal article

Sporting chance

Author:
ANDREWS Crispin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Sport can have real benefits for people experiencing mental illness. In October 2014 the then coalition government launched Get Set to Go, a scheme to encourage people with mental health problems to play sport. The scheme is running across a number of English regions, with project being run by local Mind offices. This article looks at the benefits of sport for people with mental health problems and describes a project that uses cricket to develop skills in target setting, focus, cooperation and social skills. The article also highlights the importance of ensuring the right people are providing coaching at such projects. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Practical approaches to minimising restraint

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
8 minutes 20 seconds
Place of publication:
London

This film uses two examples to illustrate how restraint can be minimised. The first example describes the experience of Peter, who is living in a care home and has a urinary tract infection. A common side effect of such infections is confusion, which is made worse by Peter's Alzheimer's disease. The second story is about Florence, a lady in her 80's who had developed a chest infection and had been admitted to hospital suffering delirium. Key messages for practice are: sometimes it is necessary to apply restraint in the person's best interests; the need for restraint has to be reassessed on each and every occasion as people's needs and capacity change; using a person-centred approach and understanding a person's life story is vital; and talking with colleagues, carers families and people who use services can help to minimise restraint. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

The psychological impact of austerity: a briefing paper

Authors:
McGRATH Laura, GRIFFIN Vanessa, MUNDY Ed
Publisher:
Psychologists Against Austerity
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
16

This briefing paper draws on previous research to link austerity and cuts to public services with mental health problems. It identifies discusses five ways in which austerity policies impact on mental health, illustrating each with a short case study. These ‘Austerity Ailments’ are: humiliation and shame; fear and distrust; instability and insecurity; isolation and loneliness; and being trapped and powerless. The briefing also discusses the some of the key indicators of living in a psychologically healthy society, which include: agency; security; connection; meaning; and trust. It argues that creating these conditions for wellbeing and resilience directly helps to prevent distress in the short and long term, thereby saving resources and reducing suffering. It provides recommendations for services, communities and policy makers on the best ways to produce these outcomes. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Young people's mental health

Author:
YOUTH SELECT COMMITTEE
Publisher:
British Youth Council
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
40
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the findings from the Youth Select Committee’s inquiry into mental health services for young people. The committee consists of eleven people, aged 13-18 and includes both elected and reserved seats to ensure a broad representation of interests and experience from all parts of the UK. The report deals with the current state of service, levels of funding and changes to service provision. It looks at quality of education, training for teachers and the role of schools and explores awareness of mental health and digital culture. The report includes a set of key recommendations. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland: profile and trends

Authors:
BLACK Carolyn, MARTIN Chris
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
98
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report explores trends in mental health and wellbeing among adolescents in Scotland and the factors which best predict higher and lower mental health and wellbeing. The data shows that in the last three years there has been a marked change in mental health and wellbeing among pupils. While some aspects have improved (conduct problems, pro-social behaviour) or remained largely the same over time (hyperactivity, mental wellbeing), others have worsened (emotional problems and peer problems). One of the starkest changes is the extent to which mental health and wellbeing has changed among 15 year old girls, particularly in terms of their emotional wellbeing. In 2010, 28 per cent of 15 year olds girls had a borderline or abnormal emotional problems score. This increased to 41 per cent in 2013. Physical wellbeing was linked to mental health and wellbeing – those who had a limiting illness or disability reported poorer mental health and wellbeing than those that did not – particularly in relation to emotional problems. A number of activities appeared to have a protective effect against poor mental health and wellbeing (although causal links are likely to be complex). Expecting to go to university, belonging to a group or club and seeing friends, doing a hobby, reading books or playing a sport at least weekly were associated with better mental health and wellbeing. For girls, in particular, playing sport on a weekly basis was strongly related to lower levels of emotional and behavioural problems. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Perinatal mental health services: recommendations for the provision of services for childbearing women: CR197

Author:
OATES Margaret
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
28
Place of publication:
London

This report describes the provision of good-quality mental health services to childbearing women. It is intended to assist those providing and planning services for pregnant and postpartum women across a range of disorders and severities at all levels of service provision. It outlines the particular importance of perinatal mental health problems and the need for specialised services. In addition, it examines the current provision of care and services for perinatal mental health disorders and sets out the key principles that underpin good care. The report makes a series of recommendations, including: provision of specialised mother and baby unit services; access to care and treatment from a specialised perinatal community mental health team; and closer working relationships between specialised perinatal and adult mental health, child and adolescent mental health services, maternity services, health visitors and children’s social services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Fundamental facts about mental health 2015

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
93
Place of publication:
London

A comprehensive summary of mental health research, providing a handbook of key facts and figures, covering all key areas of mental health. The document shows that in the UK mental health problems are responsible for the largest burden of disease – 28 per cent of the total burden, while mental health research receives only 5.5 per cent (£115 million) of total UK health research spending. One in four people experience a mental health problem in any given year and ten per cent of children and young people (aged 5-16 years) have a clinically diagnosable mental problem. Common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety are distributed according to a gradient of economic disadvantage across society with the poorer and more disadvantaged disproportionately affected from common mental health problems and their adverse consequences. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Working with students with psychiatric disabilities or other emotional problems

Author:
MAZZA Elena T.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 35(4), 2015, pp.425-448.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The professional literature on gatekeeping in social work education has grown; however, there remains a dearth in the literature regarding how educators truly work to engage students who are experiencing a psychiatric disability or other emotional problem. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 26 social work educators from 22 colleges and universities in the United States. Practice wisdoms emerged as interwoven strategies which encourage proactive interventions that accentuate students’ strengths through socially just opportunities. Identified strategies include having an awareness of psychosocial and environmental stressors that students may be experiencing, recognizing warning signs, approaching students, and building appropriate faculty-student relationships. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Relations between internalizing and externalizing problems in early childhood

Authors:
STONE Lisanne L., et al
Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Care Forum, 44(5), 2015, pp.635-653.
Publisher:
Springer

Background: Childhood internalising and externalising problems are closely related and often co-occur. Directional models have been employed to test how these problems are related, while few studies have tested a third variables model. Objective: This study investigates whether internalising and externalising problems are reciprocally or unidirectionally related, whether these relations can be explained by third variables, and how these relations are associated with onset and stability. Methods: A community sample of 1,434 children aged 5.08 (SD = 1.25) and their mothers participated in two 1-year interval data waves. Internalising and externalising problems were examined with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Results: Using latent cross-lagged modelling, externalising problems were found not be related to subsequent internalising problems, or vice versa. These results were also found when controlling for inadequate parenting, parenting stress, maternal health and social preference. When taking problem level into account, externalising problems were related to stability of clinical level internalising problems, even when controlling for third variables inadequate parenting, parenting stress, maternal mental health and social preference. Conclusions: Strong autoregressive paths for internalising and externalising problems were found. Internalising and externalising problems do not seem to influence each other over time in the community sample. When investigating relations among internalising and externalising problems, it seems to be important to take problem level into account. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

What is normal behaviour in persons with developmental disabilities?

Authors:
DOSEN Anton, De GROEF Johan
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(5), 2015, pp.284-294.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Annoying and bothersome behaviours among persons with developmental disabilities (DD) is a relatively frequent phenomenon. However, not all behaviour that is difficult to accept in its surroundings should be seen as abnormal or problem behaviour (PB). Some of these behaviours may be an expression of a person’s psychosocial needs and may be considered as adaptive and normal. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: Authors attempt to discuss relevant issues in persons with DD which have an impact on their behaviour, intending in this way to define criteria for a reliable differentiation between normal and abnormal behaviour and psychiatric disorders. Findings: Differentiating between normal and abnormal may be a difficult task for a professional treating persons with DD because of the lack of adequate criteria for such differentiation. The problem becomes even more complex when one attempts to differentiate between PB and psychiatric disorder. By approaching the subject from a developmental perspective and by determining the level of the person’s emotional development, insight in subjective person’s experiences was achieved. On the ground of a “good practice” the authors made schemata outlining criteria for differentiation between these constructs. Originality/value: The application of these schemata in the practice made it easier to establish appropriate diagnoses and was favourable for the planning of adequate treatment and support of persons with DD and mental health problems. (Publisher abstract)

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