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Book Full text available online for free

NIHR Mental Health Research Network guide to finding and reading a research paper

Author:
CARPENTER Joanna
Publisher:
National Institute for Health Research
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
21p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide is aimed at helping the general public, mental health service users, and their carers gain access to the results of mental health research. It explains: how research is published as research papers; what the different sorts of papers are (original article, case report, review article, editorial, letters to the editor, commentary); how they are structured (introduction, methods, results, discussion); how to identify a particular research paper; and, finally, how to get hold of it. Information is included on the MHRN Service Users in Research, a network of people with experience of mental health problems who are interested in research. Many useful links are also provided.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Personal budgets: risk enablement and mental health

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2012
Place of publication:
London

This film showcases the work of Stockport Council and Pennine Care NHS Trust. As part of their risk enablement strategy for personal budgets and mental health they established a risk enablement panel as a last resort for discussing final support plans for people considered to be at risk. However, in the three years since the panel was established, they have only used it twice. Stockport has also committed to a culture change where staff and service users are able to openly discuss positive risk taking and concerns about risk. This has resulted in people with mental health problems (even those with more complex needs who use a budget managed by a third party) being able to use their personal budgets more creatively. They are experiencing positive outcomes such as improved confidence and self-determination and greater levels of activity. They also have more opportunities to take up volunteering and training for employment.

Book Full text available online for free

Experts by experience: values framework for peer working

Author:
SCOTTISH RECOVERY NETWORK
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
Glasgow
Edition:
Reprint 2013

This Values Framework has been developed to increase awareness and understanding of the role of peer worker. Peer workers are individuals with personal experience of mental health problems who are trained and employed to support others. The framework is grounded in six core values: authenticity, hope, experience, mutuality, responsibility, and empowerment. The document sets out how each value translates in practice, and through which behaviour they can be demonstrated. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Navigating multiple roles as a researcher in a Photovoice project

Author:
BRYCE Hazel
Journal article citation:
Groupwork, 22(3), 2012, pp.33-48.
Publisher:
Whiting and Birch

This article focuses on the authors experience of facilitating a Photovoice project within the context of a government funded outreach mental health team based in the UK. An auto ethnographic lens was used to explore the experience of being simultaneously a facilitator, researcher, participant and mental health professional during the project. Photovoice is a participatory action research methodology which values and shares peoples’ expertise and intimate knowledge of their own communities, through the use of photographs and written captions. The theme for this group project was: the experience of participating in social activity groups that were facilitated by the outreach team. This article discusses and reflects on Photovoice methodology, and considers the multiple roles adopted and how this relates to insider and outsider positions whilst working with groups. It is suggested that the notion of co-curation could be used to further understand and explore the exhibition that was produced. Co-curation is the process of collecting artefacts to produce an exhibition together which represents a shared aspect of life. In this instance photography is the chosen medium to facilitate co-curation. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The DSM-5’s proposed new categories of sexual disorder: the problem of false positives in sexual diagnosis

Author:
WAKEFIELD Jerome C.
Journal article citation:
Clinical Social Work Journal, 40(2), 2012, pp.213-223.
Publisher:
Springer
Place of publication:
New York

The proposals that have emerged from the DSM-5 revision process have triggered considerable controversy, especially regarding potential invalid inflation of diagnostic categories. To illustrate the kinds of issues that have emerged, the author closely examines the proposed new categories of sexual disorder. The DSM-5 Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders Work Group is proposing the addition of three categories of disorder to the DSM-5—hypersexuality, hebephilia (as part of a revised pedophilia category that would become pedohebephilia), and coercive paraphilic disorder (basically a “nonconsent” or rape paraphilia). These proposals are driven by perceived clinical or forensic needs. The author argues, however, that their conceptual soundness remains problematic; each could lead to large numbers of false positive diagnoses (i.e., diagnoses that mistakenly label a normal variant of behavior as a mental disorder), with potential for serious forensic abuse in “sexually violent predator” civil commitment proceedings. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Using participatory video to challenge the stigma of mental illness: a case study

Authors:
BUCHANAN Avril, MURRAY Michael
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 14(1), 2012, pp.35-43.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Despite advances in the treatment of different forms of mental ill health, it continues to attract substantial stigmatisation, with public attitudes being increasingly negative. While reviews have highlighted the extensive research on the nature of this stigma, there is limited work on the development of strategies to challenge the stigma. The aim of this case study was to examine the potential of researchers and mental health service users (MHSUs) working collaboratively to identify the main problems the service users experience in their everyday lives and to produce a video challenging the negative image of mental ill health. Discussions were held with volunteers involved in a mental health media action group; all volunteers had been or were currently MHSU. These discussions identified a variety of problems including difficulties in everyday social interaction and negative portrayal of mental ill health in the media. A short video was developed with volunteers summarising the issues they had raised: this was subsequently shown to a wider audience. The MHSUs reported considerable personal benefits of participation in the project. The paper discusses these findings and the process of producing the video.

Journal article

Experiences of clients who have made the transition from the psychiatric hospital to community service provision: a phenomenological approach

Authors:
MANNIX-MCNAMARA Patricia, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 14(1), 2012, pp.44-56.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Mental health and well-being are fundamental to the quality of life and the productivity of individuals, families and communities, enabling people to experience life as meaningful. Deinstitutionalisation, the replacement of long-stay hospitals with community-based alternatives, can have favourable outcomes for people experiencing mental health problems. However, in many cases the community services needed for comprehensive care are not available. This raises the question as to whether the move from the long-stay hospital has been positive or not for health of clients. Therefore, it is important to examine clients' lived experiences of such a move. This study, carried out over the period of 1 year, sought to qualitatively explore the lived experiences of clients who made the transition from institutional-based care to community service provision. Nine residents took part in the study, and the average time spent in various institutions varied from 1 to 13 years. Findings indicated that participants experienced a significant change in their lives in relation to their psychological, physical and social health and well-being. Freedom for self-determination and living in an environment that gives them autonomy is at the core of their personal experience. It could be argued that deinstitutionalisation generated a shift in client experience in relation to their health and well-being.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health strategy for Scotland 2012-15

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Government
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
61p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Mental illness is one of the top public health challenges in Europe as measured by prevalence, burden of disease and disability. It is estimated that mental disorders affect more than a third of the population every year, the most common of these being depression and anxiety. About 1-2% of the population have psychotic disorders, and across Europe 5.6% of men and 1.3% of women have substance misuse disorders. The ageing population is leading to an increase in the number of people with dementia, 5% of people over 65 and 20% of those over 80 years of age. In all countries, most mental disorders are more prevalent among those who are most deprived. The prevalence of mental disorders does not appear to be changing significantly over time, though more people are accessing treatment and support as understanding grows and the stigma of mental illness is reducing. This Scottish Government’s mental health strategy to 2015 sets out a range of key commitments across the full spectrum of mental health improvement, services and recovery to ensure delivery of effective, quality care and treatment for people with a mental illness, their carers and families.

Journal article

The effects of mental illness on families within faith communities

Authors:
ROGERS Edward B., STANFORD Matthew, GARLAND Diana R.
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 15(3), 2012, pp.301-313.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

It is understood that families are negatively affected when a member has a mental illness. This study investigated the experiences and values of families caring for a mentally ill loved one within the context of a Christian faith community. Almost 6,000 participants in 24 churches representing four Protestant denominations completed a survey describing their family's stresses, strengths, faith practices, and desires for assistance from the congregation. Findings showed mental illness in 27% of families, with those families reporting twice as many stressors on average. Families with mental illness present scored lower on measures of family strength and faith practices. Help with mental illness was a priority for those families affected by it, but ignored by others in the congregation. These findings indicate that mental illness is not only prevalent in church communities, but is accompanied by significant distress that often goes unnoticed. The authors concluded that partnerships between mental health providers and congregations may help to raise awareness in the church community.

Journal article

Mental illness and suicide in British South Asian adults

Author:
INEICHEN Bernard
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Religion and Culture, 15(3), 2012, pp.235-250.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

South Asians make up about 4.7% of the UK population. Studies from the 1990s concluded that the mental health of British people of South Asian origin was at least as good, and probably rather better, than that of the ethnic majority. Their rates for mental illness and suicide have been shown by some researchers to be lower than that of the total UK population, using a variety of measures, and considering many psychiatric conditions. This paper reviews the literature on the extent of mental illness among British South Asian adults, and explores aspects of their service use, and their attitudes to mental illness. Some distinguishing features of British South Asian mental health are identified, including areas justifying further research. The author concludes that variations in the South Asian population including generation, country of origin, religion, class, wealth and geography, emphasise the growing need to disaggregate this population when presenting data about them.

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