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Journal article

The relationship between personal debt and mental health: a systematic review

Authors:
FITCH Chris, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 16(4), 2011, pp.153-166.
Publisher:
Emerald

A systematic review was undertaken to identify peer reviewed literature in English from 1980 to 2009 in order to evaluate the evidence on the extent to which personal debt impacts on mental health, and mental health on personal debt. Database searches resulted in the identification of 50 papers meeting the inclusion criteria. These were appraised by the research team and this article presents the results of the analysis. It discusses research on the temporal relationship between debt and mental health, whether the type and size of debt matter, the role of age, income or assets in the relationship between indebtedness and mental health, the process through which debt, mental health and other factors interacted, debt and self-harm or suicide, and compulsive buying. The review found that methodological limitations made it difficult to definitively demonstrate whether indebtedness causes poor mental health, and that existing research either uses definitions of debt which lack specificity or definitions of mental health which are too broad, but that plausible data exist which indicate that indebtedness may contribute to the development of mental health problems. The authors suggest topics for further research, and note that those working with people with debt problems need to be aware of the potential risk of reduced mental well-being or mental disorder.

Journal article

Employing strong support

Author:
DENT Emma
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 1.12.11 supplement, 2011, p.7.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Having a job can promote mental health recovery, yet stigma often means disclosure of a mental health problem can lead to someone being forced out of the job or finding it hard to gain employment. The benefits of work retention schemes and individual placement and support schemes are discussed.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Sexual, reproductive and mental health: managing reproductive health

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, ABEL Kathryn
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2011
Place of publication:
London

This e-learning resource is one of 8 modules developed to help mental health professionals deal with aspects of sexual and reproductive health in the context of mental illness. Sections cover the areas of healthy reproductive health including fertility and pregnancy, sexual anatomy, menopause and effective assessment.

Book

Discovering Camphill: new perspectives, research and developments

Editors:
JACKSON Robin, (ed.)
Publisher:
Floris Books
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
336p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Bringing together research from scholars and experts in a variety of disciplines, the editors explore a broad range of issues which affect Camphill life. The essays examine social, political and educational topics including; spiritual needs, residential childcare, disabled identity, working with autistic children and the development of Camphill communities around the world. It is suggested that the lack of easily accessible literature about Camphill communities has contributed to a common perception of Camphill as 'closed' communities which have little interest in communicating with the 'the outside world'. Some influential officials and practitioners who determine education and social-work policy and practice are believed to know little about Camphill, thus increasing the risk of misunderstanding and threatening the future of Camphill communities. The book has two main aims; to report on the finding of research on several Camphill communities, and to discuss societal trends which may impact on the future of the Camphill movement. This book seeks not only to bridge the knowledge gap about Camphilll but also to demonstrate to a wider audience the unique and inspiring qualities of Camphill communities. The book is expected to be of interest to those with an interest in the provision of services for children and adults with special needs.

Journal article

Supervision in public sector behavioral health: a review

Authors:
HOGE Michael A., et al
Journal article citation:
Clinical Supervisor (The), 30(2), July 2011, pp.183-203.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Historically, supervision was a common practice in agencies delivering publically funded services to persons with serious mental and substance use conditions. However, there are numerous published references suggesting that the provision of supervision has been declining significantly over the last 2 decades. This article provides an analysis of supervision as it relates to individuals providing care within publicly funded mental health and addiction services. Based on a comprehensive review of the literature on supervision in the public sector, it summarises the current status, definition, functions, competencies, applicable standards and requirements, training approaches, and outcomes of supervision. It shows that the provision of supervision has eroded significantly due to economic constraints and the ‘flattening’ of service organisations. The literature suggests that supervision has a positive impact on supervisees’ stress levels, job satisfaction and competence, as well as on training, quality of care, and client outcomes. Recommended strategies for restoring and advancing supervision as an essential practice in systems of care are discussed.

Book Full text available online for free

Report from the forensic and challenging behaviour product review group

Author:
FORENSIC AND CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR PRODUCT REVIEW SUB GROUP
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
17p.
Place of publication:
London

This report summarises the work undertaken by the Forensic and Challenging Behaviour Product Review Sub Group over the past twelve months. It builds upon two strands of work previously undertaken, the first being the development of a clinically derived set of descriptors piloted by a group of London Medium Secure Units and the second being a modification of the Mental Health Clustering Tool (MHCT) and the 21 Clusters mandated for use in Working Aged Adult and Older Peoples services, piloted by two Trusts in the North East of England. The qualitative feedback from the seven sites was relatively consistent and showed that both allocation methods were generally quick and easy to use. It was noted that the MHCT approach required more initial training and the assessment and allocation process took slightly longer than that for the 5FP Model. However, it was noted that the 5FP Model required a clinician or clinical team to have a thorough and detailed knowledge of the case prior to allocation.

Journal article

Dealing with individuals who have mental illness: the Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) in law enforcement

Authors:
BROWNING Samuel L., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Forensic Practice, 13(4), 2011, pp.235-243.
Publisher:
Emerald

This review explores research regarding the Crisis Intervention Team’s (CIT) effectiveness in reducing criminalisation of people with mental illness, as well as improving interactions between this population and law enforcement officers. The authors provide a summary of the CIT model in the context of law enforcement's response to people with mental illness. Prior research on the CIT model has generally shown improved officer and community safety, better mental healthcare for those in need, and decreased criminalisation of those with mental illness. The authors conclude that the success of CIT has wider social implications, such as decreasing stigma regarding mental illness and fear of involving police in mental health related crises.

Journal article

The mental health of young people aging out of care and entering adulthood: Exploring the evidence from England and France

Authors:
STEIN Mike, DUMARET Annick-Camille
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 33(12), December 2011, pp.2504-2511.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This article reviews the evidence from England and France on the mental health of young people ageing out of care and into adulthood. It is the first comparative review of the two countries and concentrates on the evidence on the mental health of young people in the general population, young people living in care, young people aging out of care, and young adults. The article shows the high levels of psychological adversity of young people entering car, and the high rates of mental health problems of young people in care compared with the general population of young people. It highlights the increased risk of mental and physical problems at the time of ageing out of care, and the general improvement in longer-term outcomes for young adults, although some continue to have serious mental health problems. In conclusion, the article argues that interventions across the life course of young people are needed in both countries.

Journal article

Looking after your pearls: the dilemmas of mental health self-disclosure in higher education teaching

Author:
GOUGH Matthew
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Training Education and Practice, 6(4), 2011, pp.203-210.
Publisher:
Emerald

Drawing on a critically reflective self-selecting conference workshop for mental health educators, practitioners and others, this paper focuses on the theme of educators disclosing personal experience of mental health problems. It reports on and discusses the main areas emerging from the workshop: the personal impact of disclosure for the tutor, impact on student learning, and wider ethical issues.  It also considers the risks and benefits of personal disclosure of lived experience of mental health problems, how educators can maximise the benefits and minimise the hazards, and when and how to disclose personal experience.

Book

Crossing the acts: the support and protection of adults at risk with mental disorder: across the Scottish legislative frameworks

Author:
KEENAN Tom
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers
Publication year:
2011
Place of publication:
Birmingham

Many adults with a mental disorder need access to care and treatment and adequate support and protection. However, the tenet of this work is that adults at risk with mental disorder require a dedicated and, sometimes, a specialist approach to support and protection; primarily because their needs and risks are particular and can be complex in nature. A response to risk in many cases may need access to a comprehensive range of legislative provisions and a broad and, sometimes, specialist framework of care and support. This book explores the risks of adults with a mental disorder and how the relative Scottish legislation, policy and practice frameworks interrelate to provide them with support and protection. The book explores the dilemmas, difficulties and deliberations, for those who protect and support adults at risk with mental disorder in Scotland across the various Acts.

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