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Book Full text available online for free

100 ways to support recovery: a guide for mental health professionals

Author:
SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Rethink
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
London

This is a guide for mental health staff aiming to support the development of a focus on recovery within services and providing ideas for working with users in a recovery-oriented fashion.

Journal article

Age at onset and cognition in schizophrenia: meta-analysis

Authors:
RAJJI T.K., ISMAIL Z., MULSANT B.H.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 195(4), October 2009, pp.12-14.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study aimed to compare cognitive deficits in individuals with youth-onset and late-onset schizophrenia with those in adults with first-episode schizophrenia. Publications selected from a literature search of 29 databases from 1980 to 2008 had to include a healthy control group and analyse individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder and individuals with first-episode, youth-onset or late-onset schizophrenia separately. Data were extracted and cognitive data was aggregated into 22 cognitive measures. The conclusions were that individuals with youth-onset schizophrenia have severe cognitive deficits, whereas those with late-onset schizophrenia have some relatively preserved cognitive functions. This supports the view that severity of the disease process is associated with different ages at onset. In addition, the cognitive pattern of people with late onset schizophrenia suggests that their deficits are specific rather than solely as a result of ageing and related factors. Longitudinal and controlled studies will be necessary to address questions of specific deficits versus preserved cognitive functions and to advance understanding of the relationship between the disease process underlying schizophrenia, cognition, age at onset, duration of illness, ageing and associated factors.

Book Full text available online for free

You care, you count: a carer's guide to getting support

Author:
RETHINK
Publisher:
Rethink
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
31p.
Place of publication:
London

This document sets out commitments the government has made to addressing immediate and longer-term issues in the matter of people providing care and support for someone with mental illness.

Book Full text available online for free

Cross border transfers, cross border absconding and cross border visits under mental health law: a factsheet for practitioners

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Commission receives frequent calls on cross-border issues. These relate to planned transfers of patients, cross-border visits and cross-border absconding. Often professionals have difficulty accessing the correct statutory legislation and guidance detailing the information they require. This fact sheet outlines the appropriate sections of the legislation, the regulations and the Scottish Government guidance which relates to cross-border issues and provides links to these under the relevant section for ease of access.

Journal article

Prevalence of mental health problems among children placed in out-of-home care in Denmark

Authors:
EGELUND Tine, LAUSTEN Mette
Journal article citation:
Child and Family Social Work, 14(2), May 2009, pp.156-165.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper concerns the prevalence of mental health problems among children in family foster and residential care within a Danish context. All children, born in Denmark in 1995, who are or formerly have been placed in out-of-home care (n= 1072), are compared with a group of vulnerable children of the same age, subjected to child protection interventions but living at home (n= 1457, referred to as the 'in home care children'), and to all contemporaries who are not child protection clients (n= 71 321, referred to as the 'non-welfare children'). Prevalence data are established on the basis of national administrative register data, including data on psychiatric diagnoses of the children, and on survey data scoring children in out-of-home care, in home care children, and non-welfare children by means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results show that 20% of children in out-of-home care have at least one psychiatric diagnosis compared to 3% of the non-welfare children. Almost half of the children in care (48%) are, furthermore, scored within the abnormal range of SDQ, compared to 5% of the non-welfare children.

Journal article

Boredom as an important area of inquiry for occupational therapists

Author:
MARTIN Marion
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 72(1), January 2009, pp.40-42.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

This opinion piece argues that boredom should be considered as an important area of research by occupational therapists. Literature on the subject identifies diverse causes of boredom, including occupational deprivation; however, it is not clear why the experience should be so prevalent in a culture where opportunities for engagement in activity are unprecedented. Boredom appears to be a subject of concern for people using mental health services as well as for the general population, but there is virtually no evidence of an effective way of overcoming the experience. Some areas for investigation are suggested.

Book Full text available online for free

Scotland’s mental health and its context: adults 2009 - briefing

Authors:
TAULBUT Martin, PARKINSON Jane, CATTO Sonnda, GORDON David
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. In December 2007, NHS Health Scotland published a framework of 54 indicators to support and promote consistent and sustainable national monitoring of adult mental health and associated contextual factors in Scotland. The first systematic assessment using these indicators was published in February 2009. This briefing covers its key points.

Book Full text available online for free

Scotland’s mental health and its context: adults 2009

Authors:
TAULBUT M, PARKINSON J, CATTO S, GORDON D
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
180p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. NHS Health Scotland was commissioned by the Scottish Government to establish a core set of sustainable mental health indicators to enable national monitoring. This report provides the first ever systematic assessment of the adult population’s overall mental health. The report has three objectives: to provide a description of the state of mental health and the associated contextual factors that influence it at a single point in time, using the most recent available data, to analyse time trends for each indicator over the last decade, where possible, and to identify differences within the adult population by selected dimensions of equality, where possible.

Journal article

A sense of community

Author:
MICKEL Andrew
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 16.4.09, 2009, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Troubled children and adults with issues ranging from substance abuse to personality disorder all benefit from therapeutic communities. The author reports on they help service users to change their behaviour by taking control of their situations. A short case study which outlines how a therapeutic community helped an homeless ex-serviceman is also included.

Book Full text available online for free

People with mental health conditions and pathways to work

Authors:
HUDSON Maria, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department for Work and Pensions
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
131p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This qualitative research project aimed to identify how Jobcentre Plus Pathways to Work may better meet the needs of the mental health client group. The research explored the reasons why Pathways has yielded mixed results for clients with mental health conditions and what helps contribute to good outcomes. Fieldwork was carried out between January 2008 and February 2009 across 3 Jobcentre Plus districts. An iterative qualitative research design was used including interviews with Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff working with people with mental health conditions, incapacity benefit claimants with mental health conditions, and service provider workshops. The study focused on the areas of: Jobcentre Plus and non-Jobcentre Plus staff perceptions and experiences of working with people with mental health conditions and Pathways to Work; clients' attitudes towards and beliefs about work; clients’ experiences and perceptions of Work Focused Interviews; and clients’ experiences and perceptions of referrals; and other services and issues in entering and sustaining paid work. Many clients were satisfied with the help they received from Jobcentre Plus Pathways, though many mandatory clients felt that the opportunity to participate had not come at the right time for them. A range of suggestions are made for improvement to Pathways emerging from this research.

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