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Book Full text available online for free

Well? What do you think? (2004): The second national Scottish survey of public attitudes to mental health, mental well-being and mental health problems

Authors:
BRAUNHOLTZ Simon, DAVIDSON Sara, KING Susan
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive Social research
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
159p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The National Programme for Improving Mental Health is a key part of Scottish Executive’s health improvement and social justice policy development. The first National Scottish Survey of Public Attitudes to Mental Health was commissioned by the Executive in 2002 to help inform the National Programme’s work and to provide relevant baseline data. The second survey was commissioned to track progress towards meeting the aims of the National Programme. The survey was carried out by MORI and conducted among 1,401 adults aged 16+ in Scotland. The sample was designed to be representative of the adult population of Scotland.

Book Full text available online for free

Well? What do you think? (2004): The second national Scottish survey of public attitudes to mental health, mental well-being and mental health problems

Author:
BRAUNHOLTZ Simon; DAVIDSON Sara; KING Susan
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive Social research
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The National Programme for Improving Mental Health is a key part of Scottish Executive’s health improvement and social justice policy development. The first National Scottish Survey of Public Attitudes to Mental Health was commissioned by the Executive in 2002 to help inform the National Programme’s work and to provide relevant baseline data. The second survey was commissioned to track progress towards meeting the aims of the National Programme. The survey was carried out by MORI and conducted among 1,401 adults aged 16+ in Scotland. The sample was designed to be representative of the adult population of Scotland.

Journal article

The 'voices group': a therapeutic group for psychotic patients in a therapeutic community

Authors:
MANNU Jose, BORRI Giansiro
Journal article citation:
Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 25(3), Autumn 2004, pp.153-168.
Publisher:
Association of Therapeutic Communities

Attempts to analyse the characteristics of a 'voices group' that is part of a therapeutic community programme mainly concerned with people affected by psychosis. The therapeutic effects seen as a whole, and how its different aspects are interconnected, form the necessary premise for understanding this group. It was set up following a request from some patients in the community and because it is a phenomenon not yet thoroughly explained from a psychological point of view, and because currently auditory hallucinations are treated virtually exclusively pharmacologically. The paper is a case study attempting to highlight the difficult moments in the evolution of a community programme with repercussions in the group as well as in the patient's development both inside and outside the group.

Journal article

From 'gibbering idiot' to 'iceman', Kenny's story: a critical analysis of an occupational narrative

Author:
FINLAY Linda
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Occupational Therapy, 67(11), November 2004, pp.474-480.
Publisher:
College of Occupational Therapists

Narratives can offer rich, valuable and powerful insights. However, they do not stand on their own: they need to be interpreted and contextualised. This paper offers a critical analysis of the occupational narrative of one man's journey towards finding a new occupational identity after experiencing mental health problems. It reveals something of Kenny's lived experience and his occupational needs, drivers and trajectory. The value of occupation (rather than simply employment) is demonstrated. The narrative is then briefly analysed: first by taking a phenomenological approach focusing on the lived experience and secondly by taking a social constructionist approach which highlights how the story is both performed and co-constructed. This two-pronged analysis demonstrates how narratives are produced and constructed in particular social contexts. How we understand a narrative depends on how we frame it and the theoretical perspectives we bring to bear. It is important to be reflexive - critically self-aware - as we engage in narrative inquiry.

Journal article

Out into the world

Authors:
GIBSON Anne, DONNA
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 8(3), August 2004, p.29.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes how a group of friends moved from their sheltered environment to a mainstream college course, supported by a staff member from Workshop & Company. Summarises the process, and gives one member's description of the experience.

Journal article

New answers to old problems

Authors:
AGUIRRE Annabel, THOMAS Rosalind
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 130, November 2004, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
MIND

Asks if art therapy can help the mentally ill. If it does make a difference, how and why? It it only one of many therapies or is there something uniquely valuable about it? A research project involving 6 service users and 3 researchers explored what it was like to be in a group from the members' perspective. Includes their words and images.

Journal article

Inclusion, recovery and person centred planning

Author:
EDMONDSON Paula
Journal article citation:
Soundtrack, 30, September 2004, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
National Development Team

States that the negative experiences of people diagnosed with mental illness can be challenged. One approach is to ensure people recovering have support to use the same resources and opportunities as other citizens. Lists categories for change from the Social Exclusion Unit report Mental health and social exclusion (2004). Describes person-centred approaches.

Journal article

Determinants of outcome in the pathways through care for children hearing voices

Authors:
ESCHER Sandra, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 13(3), July 2004, pp.208-222.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Auditory hallucination, or hearing voices, is generally associated with psychopathology. In psychiatry it is interpreted as a symptom of an illness, with no connection to the individual's life history. In this study from the Netherlands, 80 children and youngsters hearing voices were interviewed on four occasions over a period of three years about the content of the voices and their overall experience of voices, focusing on the determinants for a promising outcome in the pathways through care. The results indicate that the need for care in the context of the experience of voices is associated not only with high levels of problem behaviour and associated negative symptoms of psychosis, but also, independently, with an appraisal of the voices in terms of anxiety, depression, dissociation and frequency of occurrence. In 60 per cent of the participants the voices disappeared during the three-year research period. The relationship between the disappearance of voices and the course of mental health treatment is, however, ambiguous.

Journal article

Work in harmony

Author:
PHILPOT Terry
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 17.6.04, 2004, pp.32-34.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on a visit to, Lothlorien, a therapeutic community in Scotland for people with mental health problems. Informed by Buddhism, it is trying to break down the distinction between well and unwell.

Digital Media

My crazy parents

Authors:
MATTHEWS Morgan, (Director)
Publisher:
Minnow Films
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
(50 mins.), DVD
Place of publication:
London

For these documentary films, three families where one of the parents had mental health problems were filmed over a six month period. Often through the eyes of the children, the films show how the family is affected and how the children cope with traumatic situations. Issues covered include parents overdosing or repeatedly self-harming and children having to go repeatedly into care. As part of the process the families also filmed themselves to produce video diaries of their thoughts and experiences.

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