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Journal article Full text available online for free

Carers' and Users' Expectations of Services-User Version (CUES-U): a new instrument to measure the experience of users of mental health

Authors:
LELLIOTT Paul, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, July 2001, pp.67-72.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The Department of Health in England intends to evaluate mental health services "against the aspirations and experience of its users". Surveys of service users will be conducted locally as a function of clinical governance and by the new Commission for Health Improvement as it inspects mental health services. Although there are tested instruments for measuring aspects of the experience of service users, including quality of life, needs problems and satisfaction with services none address all or even most of the issues that are important to service users. This report describes the development instrument to enable users of mental health services to rate their experiences across the range of domains that they consider to be important.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Survey of patients from an inner-London health authority in medium secure psychiatry care

Authors:
LELLIOTT Paul, AUDINI Bernard, DUFFETT Richard
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 179, January 2001, pp.62-66.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Under-provision by the National Health Service (NHS) has led to an increase in medium secure psychiatric beds managed by the independent sector. Black people are over-represented in medium secure care. This study describes those people from an inner-London health authority occupying all forms of medium secure provision, and compares those in NHS provision with those in the independent sector, and Black patients with White patients. The researchers concluded that the NHS meets only part of the need for medium secure care of the population of this London health authority. This comparison of the characteristics of Black and White patients does not help to explain why Black people are over-represented in medium secure settings.

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