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Journal article

Alive and well-but hard to find

Author:
HOPTON John
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 103, May 2000, p.9.
Publisher:
MIND

Looks at the status of therapeutic communities.

Book

Advocacy and mental health

Author:
EVANS Louise Rhian
Publisher:
University of East Anglia
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
46p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
Norwich

Introduces the concept of advocacy in mental health and goes on to discuss in detail the various different kinds of advocacy, how workers may fit into advocacy roles, and the real function of advocacy and how it may be valuable to people with mental health problems.

Book

The Mental Health Act explained

Authors:
DOLAN Bridget, POWELL Debra
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
291p.
Place of publication:
London

This guide aims to make accessible every Point of Law in the Mental Health Act 1983. It consists of the complete text of the Act, in Section sequence, with each clause followed, unless self explanatory, by notes written by experts in the field. It therefore covers: hospital admission, patients concerned in criminal proceedings or under sentence, consent to treatment, mental health review tribunals, removal and return of patients within the UK, management of property and affairs of patients, and miscellaneous functions and supplemental provisions.

Book Full text available online for free

Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000

Author:
SCOTLAND. Scottish Executive
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Executive
Publication year:
2000
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Information about The Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000, which provides ways to manage the financial and welfare affairs of people who are unable to manage them for themselves. Suitable for professionals and lay people.

Book Full text available online for free

A question of choice

Author:
NATIONAL SCHIZOPHRENIA FELLOWSHIP
Publisher:
National Schizophrenia Fellowship
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
London

There is a growing concern regarding the quality of communication between medical professionals and those who receive mental health services from them . One focus of this concern has been around how the medics convey information to their patients – or not. “A Question of Choice” surveyed the treatment experiences service users. At the basic level of talking about treatment, and taking steps to ensure correct administration of drugs, a third or more of users reported no communication from their doctor; while about two thirds reported being given no information on possible side effects of their treatment or being offered any choice of treatment.

Book

The mental health handbook

Author:
POWELL Trevor
Publisher:
Speechmark
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
186p.
Place of publication:
Bicester
Edition:
Rev. ed.

This edition of the Mental Health Handbook has now been republished with many additions to the original work. It contains an expanded treasury of successful handouts to photocopy covering many areas of mental health rehabilitation: Stress, depression, changing habits and behaviour, anxiety, assertion and caring for others

Book Full text available online for free

Psychiatric morbidity among young offenders in England and Wales

Authors:
LADER Deborah, SINGLETON Nicola, MELTZER Howard
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office for National Statistics
Publication year:
2000
Pagination:
94p.
Place of publication:
London

This report presents information on the mental health of young offenders from a survey of psychiatric morbidity among prisoners aged 16-64 in England an Wales. The survey was carried out between September and December 1997. It was commissioned by the Department of Health. The report brings together the data on prevalence of mental disorders among young offenders from the main report of the survey together with the results of additional analysis of service use, risk factors and social functioning which were previously only available for the prison population as a whole.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Admission patterns by psychiatric trainees: are women patients as likely as men to be admitted for major mental illness?

Authors:
SAJAHAN P.M., McINTOSH A.M., CAVANAGH J.T.
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 24(2), 2000, pp.59-61.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The authors hypothesised that the increased admission rate for men with major mental illness may be the result of men being preferentially admitted by psychiatrists. A questionnaire survey was devised and sent to all psychiatric trainees on the South-East Scotland rotation. The questionnaire contained a series of psychiatric vignettes representing conditions varying in severity of risk. Seventy-eight per cent responded to the questionnaire. Trainees were more likely to admit patients representing a greater degree of risk irrespective of the gender of the patient. The authors conclude that the increasing admission rates for men with major mental illness is unlikely to be due to admission bias by trainees.

Journal article

Meeting Chinese mental health needs

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Diverse Minds Magazine, 7, November 2000, pp.4-5.
Publisher:
MIND

Looks at the work of the Chinese Mental Health Association.

Journal article

Adolescents' help-seeking behaviour: the difference between self- and other referral

Authors:
RAVIV Amiram, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adolescence, 23(6), December 2000, pp.721-740.
Publisher:
Academic Press

This Israeli study examines the difference between adolescents' willingness to seek help for themselves and their willingness to refer others for help. Results found adolescents were more willing to refer another person than themselves to most of the sources of support. Differences were more pronounced for severe problems and referrals to psychologists, school counsellor and teachers. Girls were more willing than boys to seek help from their parents and friends. Actual help-seeking behaviour was positively related to willingness to seek help from various sources of support. The results are discussed with reference to the threat to self mechanism and other costs.

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