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Book Full text available online for free

Mental health in Wales: fundamental facts 2016

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

An overview of key facts and statistics of mental health in Wales. Areas covered include: prenatal and postnatal mental health services; child and adolescent mental health; mental health in the prison population; carers; self-harm; suicide; and the impact of poverty on mental health. The document also identifies key areas of data on mental health that are missing, specifically relating to Wales. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Application of community treatment orders (CTOs) in adults with intellectual disability and mental disorders

Authors:
GUPTA Jaya, et al
Journal article citation:
Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, 9(4), 2015, pp.196-205.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore use of community treatment orders (CTOs) in adults with intellectual disability (ID) and mental health problems across England and Wales. Design/methodology/approach: A web-based exploratory survey was sent to 359 consultants on the database of the Faculty of the Psychiatry of ID, Royal College of Psychiatrists who had declared ID as their main speciality. Socio-demographic details of responding consultants, clinical characteristics of adults with ID on CTO, subjective views of consultants on using CTOs in people with ID were collected and analysed. Findings: In total, 94 consultant questionnaires were returned providing information on 115 patients detained under CTO. More than 75 per cent of the respondents had used CTO in their clinical practice. Patients subject to CTO were generally young, white males with mild ID and living in supported accommodation. CTOs were primarily used in situations of non-engagement (52.2 per cent), non-compliance with medication (47 per cent) or non-compliance with social care supports (49.6 per cent). Practical implications: Responding consultants expressed concerns about encroachment of civil liberties and ethics of using CTOs in people with ID who may lack capacity and stressed that decision to use CTOs needs to be therefore done on individual basis. Originality/value: This is the first national study to examine the practice of applying CTOs in adults with ID and mental disorders. Current practice is based on evidence from research done in adults with normal intelligence. Further research is needed to investigate the utility of CTOs in routine clinical practice in adults with ID and mental disorders. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

A criminal use of police cells? The use of police custody as a place of safety for people with mental health needs

Authors:
HM INSPECTORATE OF CONSTABULARY, et al
Publisher:
HM Inspectorate of Constabulary
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
59
Place of publication:
London

This joint inspection by Her Majesty‟s Inspectorate of Constabulary (HMIC); Her Majesty‟s Inspectorate of Prisons (HMIP); the Care Quality Commission (CQC); and Healthcare Inspectorate Wales (HIW) examines the extent to which police custody is used as a place of safety under section 136 of the Mental Health Act 1983. The inspection wanted to examine why, despite guidance, codes of practice, and recommendations made in earlier studies, police custody continues to be used so frequently. It also focused on partnership and multi-agency working and how effective the police service and health partners are in working together recording and monitoring the use of section 136; and how data are collected, used and shared between partners. The report also considers training and staff awareness of policies and procedures regarding the use of section 136; and the perspectives of those detained under section 136 and their views on their time in police custody. Fieldwork took place during May and June 2012, and comprised inspection of seven police forces (Kent; Lancashire; Leicestershire; Norfolk; North Wales; Suffolk; and Sussex), two Metropolitan Police boroughs (Bromley and Lewisham), and the associated mental health trusts. The report recommends that Codes of Practice should be be amended to bring down detention time to a maximum of 24 hours in police custody. Once this period has elapsed, any assessments which are needed should be undertaken in a hospital. The Mental Health Act 1983 should be amended to remove a police station as a place of safety for those detained under section 136, except on an exceptional basis. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Still in the red: update on debt and mental health

Author:
MIND
Publisher:
MIND
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
21p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The circle of debt and mental health problems is well established. One in 11 people in the UK reports being in debt or arrears, and for people with mental health problems this rises to one in four. In May 2008 Mind published “In the red” based on a survey of almost 2,000 people with experience of both debt and mental health problems. This follow-up survey, “Still in the red”, reveals worrying numbers of people with mental health problems living below the Government-defined poverty line as they struggle to cope with debts. It surveyed almost 900 people living with mental health problems and found that: 45% were living on below £200 a week, rising to 54% among those in problem debt; over 80% felt they were often struggling to manage their finances, rising to 95% among those in problem debt; and almost 75% thought that their mental health problems had made their debt worse. This rose to over four-fifths among those in problem debt. This report concludes that knowledge and practice has clearly improved in a number of areas but there is still a lot of room for improvement.

Journal article

Self-reported life events, social support and psychological problems in adults with intellectual disabilities

Authors:
HULBERT-WILLIAMS Lee, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 24(5), September 2011, pp.427-436.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Previous research has demonstrated a relationship between life events and psychological problems in people with intellectual disabilities. However, these studies have typically relied on proxy informants, usually professional carers or family members. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between life events and psychological problems in people with intellectual disabilities using self-report data. In addition, the study aimed to examine the direct effect of social support on psychological problems, and its moderating influence on the relationship between life events and psychological problems. The participants, 38 adults with intellectual disabilities, completed 3 psychological measures in a semi-structured interview setting: the Bangor Life Events Schedule for Intellectual Disabilities Self-Report; the Brief Symptom Inventory; and the Social Network Map. The findings showed that exposure to life events, such as death of a close friend or relative or a permanent change in staffing, were positively associated with measures of psychological problems. Social support was generally not found to be associated with psychological problems, although more psychological problems were reported by participants who also reported more criticism of them by others.

Book Full text available online for free

Perceptions of the social harms associated with khat use

Authors:
SYKES Wendy, et al
Publisher:
Great Britain. Home Office
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

This report describes the findings from a study exploring the perceived social harms associated with the use of khat (a vegetable stimulant grown and used in the countries of East Africa and the Middle East and available through a variety of outlets in the UK). The study comprised focus groups and interviews with: members of the Somali, Yemeni and Ethiopian communities; members of the wider community; and practitioners including those from health, education and enforcement fields. In addition, a short survey of Drug Action Teams was conducted to gauge the availability of treatment service provision for khat users. Findings showed that khat was used all three communities and considered by users, non-users and many practitioners to be a normal, socially accepted practice, cutting across the social spectrum. Heavy khat use was perceived as problematic. Perceptions of the harms associated with khat included harm to: physical and mental health; work and finances; and relationships, marriage and family life.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Mind's blog

Author:
MIND
Publisher:
MIND
Place of publication:
London

The official blog of the charity Mind. Posts are on a range of topics relating in some way to mental health and aim to stimulate debate about mental health and Mind's work.

Journal article

Blue remembered skills: mental health awareness training for police officers

Authors:
CUMMINGS Ian, JONES Stuart
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adult Protection, 12(3), August 2010, pp.14-19.
Publisher:
Emerald

Police officers can have a key role to play in situations where individuals are experiencing some sort of crisis relating to their mental health. Despite the fact that this is a very important facet of day to day police work, it is an area that is neglected in police training. The Bradley Report has raised a number of important questions regarding the treatment of individuals who are experiencing mental health problems and find themselves in the criminal justice system. One of the key recommendations is that professional staff working across criminal justice organisations should receive increased training in this area. This paper outlines two approaches to the training of police officers in the mental health field. The first is a joint working initiative between Hywel NHS Trust and Dyfed Powys Police. In this training, all student officers receive 2 days training in first aid in mental health, and spend 4 days at the acute psychiatric unit where they become personally involved in the care of individuals who are experiencing acute distress. The second approach comprised a classroom-based training course directed at custody sergeants. The article goes on to consider the most effective models of training for police officers.

Book

Women detained in hospital: a report by the Mental Health Act Commission

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH ACT COMMISSION
Publisher:
Mental Health Act Commission
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
37p.
Place of publication:
London

This report highlights some of the key issues found by the Mental Health Act Commission over two years in visiting and talking to women patients detained in NHS and independent hospitals in England and Wales, including how many are detained, gender separation, women detained on predominantly male wards, the public sector duty to promote gender equality, providing a sense of safety, the role of the built environment, acute admission wards, secure care, the role of nursing and other disciplines, physical healthcare, maintaining family contact, assessment, rehabilitation and recovery and models of therapeutic care, and diversity, ending with a conclusion and recommendations. Note: The Mental Health Act Commission was abolished in March 2009. This document is no longer freely available on the Internet.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Associations between common mental disorders and the Mental Illness Needs Index in community settings

Authors:
FONE David L., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 191(8), August 2007, pp.158-163.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The relationship between the Mental Illness Needs Index (MINI) and the common mental disorders is not known. Mental health status was measured using the Mental Health Inventory of the Short Form 36 instrument (SF–36). Data from the Caerphilly Health and Social Needs population survey were analysed in multilevel models of 10 653 individuals aged 18–74 years nested within the 2001 UK census geographies of 110 lower super output areas and 33 wards. The MINI score was significantly associated with common mental disorder after adjusting for individual risk factors. This association was stronger at the smaller spatial scale of the lower super output area and for individuals who were permanently sick or disabled. MINI is potentially useful for small-area needs assessment and service planning for common mental disorder in community settings.

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