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Book

Economics, mental health and policy: an overview

Authors:
KNAPP Martin, et al
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
41p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report summarises findings presented at Mental Health Economics European Network events in London and Brussels in September and December 2007. It highlights funding issues, assesses the merits of the case for investment in promotion and prevention, looks at how economic incentives might influence the balance of care, reflects on some implications of poor mental health for employment and productivity, focuses on further development of the European Service Mapping Schedule and, as an example, considers the challenges to be faced in two  countries, Turkey and Hungary, currently undergoing rapid economic and social transition.

Journal article

Psychological maltreatment, coping strategies, and mental health problems: a brief and effective measure of psychological maltreatment in adolescents

Author:
ARSLAN Gokmen
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 68, 2017, pp.96-106.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Psychological maltreatment is an important social and public health problem and associated with a wide range of short and long-term outcomes in childhood to adulthood. Given the importance of investigating mitigating factors on its effect, the purpose of the present study is to investigate the mediating effect of active and avoidant coping strategies on the association between psychological maltreatment and mental health– internalising and externalising– problems in adolescents. Participants of the study consisted of 783 adolescents, ranging in age from 14 to 18 years, with 52.9% female and 47.1% male. Several structural equation models were conducted to investigate the mediating role of coping strategies on the effect of psychological maltreatment on adolescents’ internalising and externalising problems. Findings from mediation analyses demonstrated the mediating effect of active and avoidant coping strategies on the association between psychological maltreatment and mental health problems. The outcomes support adolescents use more avoidant coping strategies and fewer active coping strategies in the face of psychological maltreatment experiences, and this affects their mental health. Taken together, these results should contribute to the design of prevention and intervention services in order to promote mental health. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Psychiatric evaluation of sexual abuse cases: a clinical representative sample from Turkey

Authors:
FIS Nese Perdahli, et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 32(10), October 2010, pp.1285-1290.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This research examined the characteristics of childhood sexual abuse cases referred for psychiatric evaluation in a university hospital in Turkey. Eighty three child sexual abuse cases referred between 2006 and 2010 were included. Findings indicated that two thirds of the victims were girls, and three quarters of the perpetrators were familiar. The most common type, 44%, of sexual abuse encountered was genital contact without penetration. All of the strangers were reported to legal authorities within 3 months whereas 77% were reported when offenders were familiar. Forty percent of the cases involving offending family members needed additional evaluation by social services, as opposed to 11% of cases with offenders who were not family members. Anxiety disorders and adjustment disorder were the most common psychiatric diagnoses. Family counselling for possible risk factors, child protection, and prevention of further abuse was provided for all cases. The authors concluded that the data was similar to western studies. Because of the significant impact on the victim, publishing data and emphasising the topic of child sexual abuse should help facilitate recognition and management of such cases.

Journal article

Clinical, socio-demographic, neurophysiological and neuropsychiatric evaluation of children with volatile substance addiction

Authors:
UZUN N., KENDIRLI Y.
Journal article citation:
Child: Care, Health and Development, 31(4), July 2005, pp.425-432.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Abuse of organic volatile substances in children has become a social health problem that is increasing in the recent years. Among these substances, toluene is highly preferred by abusers because of its euphoric effect, cheapness and easy availability. There is no published research on the clinical and neurophysiological evaluation of children with short-term volatile substance addiction. In this study, socio-demographic characteristics were questioned in 12 children with a mean age of 15 years and a duration of toluene abuse for a mean of 2.3 years, and the clinical characteristics of central and peripheral nervous system damage caused by volatile substances, particularly by toluene were analysed, and probable neurological disorders were investigated by means of neurophysiological and neuropsychological tests. All tests were compared with a control group. Fifty-eight percent of the children included in the study had pathological findings in the neurological examination. There was pyramidal involvement in 25% and peripheral nerve involvement in 33.3% of the cases. Evaluation of the cognitive functions revealed 33.3% pathology in the 'Short Test of Mental Status' which assesses functions of orientation, attention, learning, arithmetic calculation, abstraction, information, construction and recall. Sensorial polyneuropathy was found in 33.3% of the cases in nerve conduction studies. Somatosensory-evoked potentials revealed pathology in 16.7% of the cases and brainstem-evoked potentials in 50% of the cases. No pathology was observed in electroencephalography and visual-evoked potentials.  In this  study, neurophysiological and neuropsychiatric tests revealed that toluene causes slow progressive, clinical and subclinical central and peripheral nerve damage. In Turkey, because of cheapness, easy availability and legal use of volatile substances, the clinical extent of systemic and neurological toxicity of volatile substance abuse is increasing. Abuse of volatile substances, a currently increasing social issue, may create important physical problems which can be permanent.

Journal article

The effects of group work with institutionalized elderly persons

Authors:
DUYAN Veli, et al
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 27(3), 2017, pp.366-374.
Publisher:
Sage

Objectives: This research article aims to measure the effects of group therapy on institutionalised elderly in terms of reducing depression and improving psychosocial functioning. Methods: Thirty elderly nursing home residents were recruited, and 16 of them elected to receive group treatment for depression and 14 declined treatment. The Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects and the Geriatric Depression Scale were given to both groups when group work began and again when it ended. Results: Clients who received group treatment experienced reductions in depression and their psychosocial functioning improved. Conclusion: Group work intervention was followed by reductions in the depression levels and improvements in their psychosocial functions among institutionalised elderly clients. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Depression in first generation labour migrants in Western Europe: the utility of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)

Authors:
SPIJKER J., et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 19(6), June 2004, pp.538-544.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The number of elderly migrants from Turkish and Moroccan descent in Western Europe will increase sharply in the coming decades. Identifying depressed elderly migrants necessitates a screening instrument that is both acceptable and has good psychometric properties. This study examines the utility of Turkish and Arabic translations of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) among elderly labour migrants from Turkish and Moroccan descent in the Netherlands. The data were derived from a community based health survey among 304 native Dutch, 330 Turkish and 299 Moroccan migrants, aged 55-74 years, living in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Acceptability, reliability, convergent and construct validity were studied. Acceptability of the CES-D was satisfactory, although Moroccan migrants and Turkish females had difficulty answering one or more of the (interpersonal) items from the CES-D. Translated versions of the CES-D proved to be highly internal consistent and have good convergent validity in both Turkish and Moroccan elderly. Depressed and somatic items were much more intermingled in Turkish and Moroccan elderly compared to earlier studies and native Dutch elderly. This fits to the hypothesis that Turkish and Moroccan elderly migrants tend to somatize their depressive symptoms much more than native Western elderly. The utility of the CES-D for elderly migrants of Turkish and Moroccan descent was found to be satisfactory.

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