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Journal article

Service users involvement in research and teaching: is there a place for it in eastern European social work

Authors:
ZAVIRSEK Darja, VIDEMSEK Petra
Journal article citation:
Ljetopis Socijalnog Rada, 16(2), December 2009, pp.207-222.
Publisher:
University of Zagreb
Place of publication:
Zagreb

The article presents three major prerequisites for users participation in research: the ‘narrative turn’ in social sciences and in social work; the impact of disability movements and other social movements in local contexts for the development of user participation; the need for the development of an anti-paternalistic, strengths and resilience-oriented perspective of the professionals towards service users. In Eastern European countries which lack all of these three essentials, user participation and involvement in research still demand a lot of cultural and professional changes. This article presents two 2007 case studies of user involvement in research and teaching in Slovenia,  where a group of mental health service users from Ljubljana were trained to become researchers in group homes for people with mental health problems. They had proven, like most of the western studies on this matter, the need for participatory research in social work in order to gain a deeper understanding of the everyday experiences of service users. Since 1999 more service users, especially those experiencing mental health problems were invited to give lectures and seminars to the social work students at the University of Ljubljana. The article analyses their experiences including the one of the ‘glass ceiling’ in the dominant culture of the power-knowledge discourse.

Journal article

The role of social work in the field of mental health: dual diagnoses as a challenge for social workers

Authors:
KVATERNIK Ines, GREBENC Vera
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 12(4), December 2009, pp.509-521.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This paper provides a discussion about the relevance of medical terminology within the social work context. The authors use the example of dual diagnoses to argue for less stigmatised attitudes toward people who become, in the process of help, labelled as people with dual diagnoses. It argues that using medical terminology in the field of social work is often a strategy to exclude people from accessing help. It is concluded that social workers do not need knowledge about diagnoses - knowing the diagnosis is important only as information that illustrates users' specific experience and perception of reality, the available resources and obstacles that people face in their everyday life. The planning of a social work intervention should be based on an operational definition of everyday life, e.g. how people live through the day, what are the important and valued roles they play in life, what are their wishes and needs.

Journal article

Understanding depression in adolescents: a dynamic psychosocial web of risk and protective factors

Authors:
KASSIS Wassilis, ARTZ Sibylle, WHITE Jennifer
Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Care Forum, 46(5), 2017, pp.721-743.
Publisher:
Springer

Background: Adolescent depression has been recognised as a complex problem that presents a global public health challenge. Left undetected and untreated, depression can significantly reduce quality of life. Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to re-visit risk and protective factors for depression in adolescents with a specific focus on exploring the individual, familial, and social contexts of depression (especially high and very high depression levels) in a multi-country sample of youth in order to see if these factors are mitigated by cultural location. Methods: Questionnaire data from a cross-sectional study of a randomly selected sample of 5149 middle-school students from four EU-countries (Austria, Germany, Slovenia, and Spain) was used. Applying variance analysis, the prediction strength for the observed risk and protective factors were examined. Results: In all participating countries the authors show that in for both male and female adolescents, depression is linked to a broad range of interactive individual, and social protective and risk factors, such that even if the contribution of a single factor is low but still significant and this factor’s prediction strength is low or moderate, taken together, the cumulative prediction strength of these factors yields a remarkably similar coefficient of determination of 42–49% in all samples. Conclusions: The authors have established a significant and relevant combination of the individual and social multifactorial risk and protective factors that characterise depression in adolescents of both genders, no matter their country of location and with that, the authors call for a multifaceted and comprehensive approach to mental health assessment, prevention and intervention. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

"I look like a mess...am I needed in the profit-oriented society?" The labour market and employment situation of some vulnerable categories of unemployed and inactive people in Slovenia

Authors:
RIHTER Ljiljana, KOBAL Barbara
Journal article citation:
Revija Za Socijalnu Politiku Journal of Social Policy, 14(3-4), 2007, pp.373-389.
Publisher:
University of Zagreb

This article presents the results of research supported by the Ministry of Labour, Family and Social Affairs, into the labour market and employment of the most vulnerable categories of unemployed people in Slovenia. The research focused on seven vulnerable categories: homeless people, people with mental health problems, people suffering from drug addiction; people suffering from alcohol addiction; people with experience of violence, people undergoing post-penal treatments and people without a work permit. Respondents from the vulnerable categories claimed they did want a job, but under reasonable circumstances. The authors suggest that a lot of obstacles should be removed first in order to improve the labour market and employment situation.

Book

Needs assessment and community care: clinical practice and policy making

Editor:
BALDWIN Steve
Publisher:
Butterworth-Heinemann
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
236p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Oxford

Reviews approaches to needs assessment and shows how they allow more precise focusing on requirements for individuals. Includes papers on: where theory of need meets practice in mental health services; the conceptual foundation of assessing health care needs; assessment of need and case management; needs assessment in a rehabilitation service; assessing the needs of people with severe mental health problems; needs assessment in older people suffering from communication difficulties and or cognitive impairment; choice in community care; feminist perspectives on community care in Australia; aspects of informal care in Northern Ireland; psychosocial intervention in nursing; Slovene mental health services; care of people with chronic mental disorders - a European/American perspective; the process of transforming an old fashioned hospital into a modern treatment centre; survivor led research in human services; and assessing learning outcomes in post-qualifying community care training.

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