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Journal article

Betting on a different horse: a qualitative analysis of mental health in health promotion policies

Authors:
SOLIN Pia, LEHTO Juhani
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 3(3), September 2004, pp.8-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Aims to analyse the position and role of mental health in health promotion policy. Policy documents from Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, England and Portugal indicate that, although mental health is considered a serious issue, it is problematic in policy terms. Arguments make the case for the importance of mental health within the health promotion agenda, including the classification of mental illness as a public health problem, socio-economic and individual costs of mental health problems, and the view that mental wellbeing is a crucial element of overall health. However, problems of definition and measurement, and a traditional focus on treatment and care, continue to make mental health promotion problematic for policy makers.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Book

Evaluation of comprehensive care of the mentally ill: the transition from mental hospital care to extramural care of the mentally ill in European Community Countries

Editors:
FREEMAN Hugh, HENDERSON John
Publishers:
Gaskell, Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
220p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Psychopathy: a comprehensive review of its assessment and intervention

Authors:
MOREIRA Diana, et al
Journal article citation:
Aggression and Violent Behavior, 19(3), 2014, pp.191-195.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Psychopathy is one of the most studied personality disorders, in terms of the negative impact that the behaviours associated with this disorder — particularly, the criminal behaviour — have in the community where the individual lives. The aim of this article is to present a comprehensive literature review on psychopathy, focusing some difficulties related to its concept, assessment, and intervention. Here, psychopathy is presented as a construct resulting from decades of clinical and empirical research, and whose dimensional nature justifies the possibility of assessing the general population. Studies indicate that psychopathy is manifested in a number of behaviours resulting from biological and personality factors related to a series of family history and environmental factors. The authors emphasise the need for more empirical research on psychopathy in the general population in Portugal, regarding the development and adaptation of measures of the construct. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Health and mental health needs and experiences of minority clients in Portugal

Authors:
MOLEIRO Carla, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Migration Health and Social Care, 5(1), June 2009, pp.15-24.
Publisher:
Emerald

The paper addresses diversity, multi-culturalism and mental health. It reports qualitative data from a larger project on multi-cultural counselling competencies in Portugal which sought to meet the needs identified by specific minority groups by developing integrative, responsive and culturally sensitive treatments. A qualitative study is presented, with the aim of exploring the representations of mental health and illness held by ethnic minority groups in Portugal, as well as their specific needs and obstacles encountered in their interactions with health professionals. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and the results indicate that the meanings of health and mental health varied. Meanings of psychological health were related to general well-being. Help-seeking behaviours were associated with providing and receiving family and social support, mainly among participants of African descent. Although the great majority of participants had had no experience of counselling or psychotherapy, they expected psychologists to be multiculturally sensitive, as well as knowledgeable about diversity and multi-culturalism. Implications for development of mental health services for minority clients are discussed.

Journal article

Psychological abuse among older persons in Europe: a cross-sectional study

Authors:
MACASSA Gloria, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aggression Conflict and Peace Research, 5(1), 2013, pp.16-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

There is evidence to suggest that the rate of elder abuse in all its forms is growing. However, because of the difficulty of measuring it, psychological abuse may be underestimated. This cross sectional study used data collected in 2009 as part of the survey “Elder abuse: a multinational prevalence survey, ABUEL”. The participants were 4,467 randomly selected persons aged 60-84 years (2,559 women, 57.3 per cent) from seven EU countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Sweden). Participants answered a structured questionnaire either face-to-face or a mix of interview/self-response. The overall prevalence of psychological abuse was 29.7 per cent in Sweden, 27.1 per cent in Germany; 24.6 per cent in Lithuania and 21.9 per cent in Portugal. The lowest prevalence was reported in Greece, Spain and Italy with 13.2 per cent, 11.5 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively. Similar tendencies were observed concerning minor/severe abuse. The Northern countries (Germany, Lithuania, Sweden) compared to Southern countries (Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain) reported a higher mean prevalence of minor/severe abuse (26.3 per cent/11.5 per cent and 12.9 per cent/5.9 per cent, respectively). Most perpetrators (71.2 per cent) were spouses/partners and other relatives (e.g. children). The analyses indicate that being from Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain was associated with a lower risk of psychological abuse. Low social support, living in rented housing, alcohol use, frequent health care use, and high scores in anxiety and somatic complaints were associated with increased risk of psychological abuse.

Book

European social services

Editor:
MUNDAY Brian
Publisher:
University of Kent. European Institute of Social Services
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
401p.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Detailed account of social services in the twelve member states of the European Community. Contains sections on: organisation, responsibility and finance for social services; preventative services; children and families; elderly people; people with disabilities; addictions; illnesses; AIDS/HIV; socially excluded people; young people; services for migrants; names and addresses of major public and private social services agencies.

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