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Journal article Full text available online for free

Community study of knowledge of and attitude to mental illness in Nigeria

Authors:
GUREJE Oye, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 186(5), May 2005, pp.436-441.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The improvement of community tolerance of people with mental illnessis important for their integration. Little is known about the knowledge of and attitude to mental illness in sub-Saharan Africa. A multistage, clustered sample of household respondents was studied in three states in the Yoruba-speaking parts of Nigeria (representing 22% of the national population). A total of 2040 individuals participated (responserate 74.2%). Poor knowledge of causation was common.Negative views of mental illness were widespread, with as many as 96.5% (s.d.=0.5) believing that people with mental illness are dangerous because of their violent behaviour. Most would not tolerate even basic social contacts with a mentally ill person: 82.7% (s.e.=1.3) would be afraid to have a conversation with a mentally ill person and only 16.9% (s.e.=0.9) would consider marrying one. Socio-demographic predictors of both poor knowledge and intolerant attitude were generally very few. There is widespread stigmatisation of mental illness in the Nigerian community. Negative attitudes to mental illness may be fuelled by notions of causation that suggest that affected people are in some way responsible for their illness, and by fear.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Psychiatric research in Nigeria: bridging tradition and modernisation

Authors:
AYONRINDE Oyedji, GUREJE Oye, LAWAL Rahmann
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 184(6), June 2004, pp.536-538.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Mental health research in Nigeria is rich in untapped opportunities, such as the highest twin rate in the world among the Yoruba. International collaboration is a key to advancing psychiatric research in Nigeria through skill development and resource sharing.

Book

Pathways to the management of mentally ill offenders in the criminal justice system

Authors:
MANNA Adelmo, KUROSAWA Ryosuke, HAMAI Koichi
Publisher:
United Nations. Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
272p.
Place of publication:
Rome

Reviews experiences from a wide range of countries in dealing with people with mental health problems within the criminal justice system.

Journal article

Reasons for consultation in the psychiatric out-patient clinic of a university teaching hospital in Nigeria: is this optimal use of psychiatrists' time and expertise?

Authors:
OMIGBODUN Olayinka, ESAN Oluyomi
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 27(10), November 2003, pp.421-423.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The aim was to identify activities that can be modified in the psychiatry out-patient clinic in order to improve the quality of services rendered. Consulting doctors obtained information on the reason for consultation and time spent by each patient over a one-month period. Half of all the patients (50.5%) came for a repeat prescription, and 19.3% came for a repeat prescription and counselling. The mean times spent on these two activities were 5.13 (s.d.=2.5) and 7.81 (s.d.=7.51) minutes, respectively. The time spent on these activities by doctors was 47% of the total clinic time. Clinic services should be reorganised so that doctors can use their skills in more efficient and creative ways.

Journal article

Geriatric depression in Nigerian primary care attendees

Authors:
SOKOYA Olukunle, BAIYEWU Olusegun
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(6), June 2003, pp.506-510.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

202 older people were screened using the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). The Geriatric Mental State schedule (GMS) was administered to participants who scored above the cut-off on the GDS in order to assess psychopathology. Diagnosis of depression was based on ICD-10 criteria as well as the GMS-AGECAT programme. The rate of geriatric depression in primary care was found to be 7.4%. Severe depression was only 1.5%. Very low income and subjective report of poor health were significantly associated with depression in the cohort. AGECAT recognition of depression was comparable to that by the ICD-10 (k = 0.7). The study is the first known study of geriatric depression in primary care in Nigeria. The rates are comparable with rates obtained in other countries. Specific correlates of depression in the older Nigerians identified included poor self-assessed health and low income.

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