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Journal article

Determinants of outcome in the pathways through care for children hearing voices

Authors:
ESCHER Sandra, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 13(3), July 2004, pp.208-222.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Auditory hallucination, or hearing voices, is generally associated with psychopathology. In psychiatry it is interpreted as a symptom of an illness, with no connection to the individual's life history. In this study from the Netherlands, 80 children and youngsters hearing voices were interviewed on four occasions over a period of three years about the content of the voices and their overall experience of voices, focusing on the determinants for a promising outcome in the pathways through care. The results indicate that the need for care in the context of the experience of voices is associated not only with high levels of problem behaviour and associated negative symptoms of psychosis, but also, independently, with an appraisal of the voices in terms of anxiety, depression, dissociation and frequency of occurrence. In 60 per cent of the participants the voices disappeared during the three-year research period. The relationship between the disappearance of voices and the course of mental health treatment is, however, ambiguous.

Journal article

Development of the illness perception questionnaire mental health

Authors:
WITTEMAN Cilia, BOLKS Lisabeth, HUTSCHEMAEKERS Giel
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 20(2), 2011, pp.115-125.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

It has been shown that influencing patients’ negative  perceptions of their illnesses is conductive to recovery and effective coping with the illness. This article considers the effect of clients’ problem perceptions in mental health care, and describes the development of a brief instrument to chart the experience of clients with psychological problems. The aim of the study was to develop a concise general version of the Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R),  a questionnaire originally developed for somatic illness, to assess how clients experience their mental health problems. The IPQ-R was adapted to psychological complaints; in particular adaptations were required to the scales that assess clients' perceptions of what their problem actually is, and what its causes are. The adapted instrument, the IPQ-Mental Health (IPQ-MH), consists of 3 parts: the identity scale; the structure scale; and the cause scale. The IPQ-MH was administered to 274 mental health clients, and psychometric analyses subsequently performed over the scores. The results showed that the identity scale of the IPQ-MH differentiates different clients, and the cause scale reliably measures clients' attributions of causes to their mental problems. The structure scale of the IPQ-MH replicates that of the original IPQ-R. The article concludes that the IPQ-MH can reliably assess clients' mental health problem perceptions.

Journal article

The validity of questionnaire self-report of psychopathology and parent–child relationship quality in juvenile delinquents with psychiatric disorders

Authors:
REUK R. E., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adolescence, 30(5), September 2007, pp.761-771.
Publisher:
Academic Press

The present study focuses on the validity of questionnaire self-report of psychopathology and parent–child relationship quality for juvenile delinquents with severe behavioural and psychiatric disorders by comparing information derived from questionnaire self-report with information from other sources, including parent report, in-depth interviewing, behavioural observation by clinicians, and official criminal records. The sample consisted of N=33 juvenile delinquents with psychiatric disorders. The juvenile delinquents did not report increased levels of psychopathology or poor relationships with their parents, which is inconsistent with the fact that all juvenile delinquents were in day treatment for severe behavioural maladaptation and relationship problems. Moreover, parent ratings of psychopathology were consistently in the clinical range and relationship quality was evaluated as very poor by the parents. It is concluded that screening instruments for psychopathology and assessment of relationship quality relying on questionnaire self-report may not yield valid scores in this (extreme) population of juvenile delinquents.

Journal article

The Lancashire quality of life profile: first experiences in the Netherlands

Authors:
van NIEUWENHUIZEN Chijs, et al
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 34(5), October 1998, pp.513-524.
Publisher:
Springer

In the Netherlands, as in many other European countries, there is a strong desire for a reliable, valid and feasible instrument to assess the quality of life of people with long-term mental illness. After careful evaluation, it was decided to translate and adapt the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile (LQOP) developed by Oliver and associates. This article presents the preliminary results of a pilot study using the LQOLP. Results indicate that the psychometric properties of the translated LQOLP are encouraging and that the instrument can be used for people with mental illness who live in the Netherlands.

Journal article

The unique relation of childhood emotional maltreatment with mental health problems among detained male and female adolescents

Authors:
VAHL Pauline, et al
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 62, 2016, pp.142-150.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Mounting evidence indicates that emotional maltreatment is at least as harmful as physical and sexual abuse. Notwithstanding their high occurrence among detained adolescents, the link between emotional maltreatment and mental health problems in these youths is not well researched. This study, therefore, was designed to examine the unique link between emotional maltreatment and mental health problems, with particular attention to gender differences. Well validated self-report measures of maltreatment experiences (Childhood Trauma Questionnaire) and mental health problems (Youth Self Report) were completed by 341 detained adolescents (156 boys, 185 girls) aged 12 to 18 years. As expected, girls reported higher levels of maltreatment experiences and internalizing and externalizing mental health problems than boys. Blockwise multiple linear regression analyses indicated that in both genders emotional abuse was uniquely and positively associated with internalizing and externalizing mental health problems, over and above the influence of other types of maltreatment. Furthermore, sexual abuse was uniquely related with internalizing problems in girls only, whereas only in boys this type of abuse was uniquely related with externalizing problems. Detained adolescents who have been the victim of emotional abuse in combination with another type of maltreatment may be the worst subgroup in terms of mental health problems. Therefore, emotional maltreatment experiences in adolescents who offend should receive more research and clinical attention. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental health and associated risk factors of Dutch school aged foster children placed in long-term foster care

Authors:
MAASKANT Anne M., ROOIJ Floor B. van, HERMANNS Jo M.A.
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 44, 2014, pp.207-216.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This study focused on the mental health of 239 foster children (aged 4–12) living in long-term placements in the Netherlands. Their behaviour was assessed with the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire, which was completed by their foster parents. The results revealed a wide range of problem behaviour (ranging from none to very serious problem behaviour), and showed that a third of the children have total difficulty scores (TDS) in the clinical range. Higher TDS appear to have a positive univariate association with age of the foster child, age upon entering the current foster family, number of prior foster placements, non-kinship placement, and fostering experience of the foster parents. The more risk factors, the higher the TDS. These findings suggest the importance of the early detection of problems and potential risk factors in foster families, and the need to support a substantial number of foster children and foster families. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

An investigation of different aspects of overgeneralization in patients with major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder

Authors:
HEUVEL Thom J. van den, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 51(4), November 2012, pp.376-395.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Overgeneralisation (defined as unjustified generalisation on the basis of a single incident), is a prominent concept in cognitive theories of personality and depression. This study carried out in the Netherlands investigated whether it is restricted to negative attributions directed at the self or also extends to positive self-attributions and attributions of situations in the outside world. The study participants were 87 psychiatric patients (34 with major depressive disorder, 18 with borderline personality disorder, and 35 with both) and 50 never-depressed non-patients, who all completed various measures of overgeneralisation. The article describes the study background and methodology, and presents the results of data analysis. It reports that patient groups differ from non-patients with respect to negative and positive overgeneralisation, and that there is variation in positive or negative and direction of overgeneralisation among patients with major depressive disorder and borderline personality disorder. It suggests that these patients lack a buffer against negative overgeneralisation directed at the self, and discusses the implications of the study findings.

Journal article

Serious juvenile offenders with and without intellectual disabilities

Authors:
KAAL H. L., BRAND E. F. J. M., VAN NIEUWENHUIJZEN M.
Journal article citation:
Journal of Learning Disabilities and Offending Behaviour, 3(2), 2012, pp.66-76.
Publisher:
Emerald

The mandatory treatment order, also called an order for Placement in an Institution for Juvenile Offenders, is the severest measure a Dutch judge is able to impose on youths. Amongst the group of juveniles under a mandatory treatment order, there is a significant number with an intellectual disability. The purpose of this study is to determine what differences there are in personal characteristics and functioning between juvenile offenders under a mandatory treatment order with IQ<70, IQ 70-85, and IQ>85, in order to be able to better fit supervision and treatment to their needs.  Data was drawn from the case files of 1,363 serious juvenile offenders under a mandatory treatment order. The files were scored using the juvenile forensic profile list (FPJ), an instrument that encompasses over 70 characteristics relevant in risk-assessment and for measuring problem behaviour. The analyses showed that the behavioural and mental health problems and background characteristics of juvenile offenders of various IQ-levels (IQ<70, IQ 70-85, and IQ>85) are in many respects very similar. However, differences were found in, for example, social skills and relationships. In addition, the needs inherent with having an intellectual disability have important implications for the way treatment is offered.

Journal article

Victims’ influence on intimate partner violence revictimization: an empirical test of dynamic victim-related risk factors

Authors:
KUIJPERS Karlijn F., VAN DER KNAAP Leontien M., WINKE Frans Willem
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 27(9), June 2012, pp.1716-1742.
Publisher:
Sage

Previous research has reported that not only characteristics of the perpetrator but also characteristics of the victim influence risk for intimate partner violence (IPV). This would suggest that prevention of repeat abuse could benefit from a focus on both perpetrator and victim characteristics. The aim of this study was to examine to what extent prior IPV and, in particular, dynamic victim-related factors influence the risk for future IPV. Specifically, the study examined how 3 key factors (partner violence, victims’ psychological difficulties, and victims’ resilience) relate to risk for IPV revictimisation. The participants were 156 female, help-seeking IPV victims recruited from various victim support services in the Netherlands in 4 large and 4 medium-sized cities. The participants completed questionnaires at 3 timepoints: at baseline, 2 months, and 6 months. The findings show that victim-related variables significantly contributed to the prediction of any physical IPV revictimisation and the severity of psychological IPV revictimisation and, moreover, that they did so in addition to the influence of any prior violence committed by a partner against the victim (i.e., any prior IPV victimisation). Knowledge on these factors might help victims of IPV to end the abuse they experience at the hands of their partners.

Journal article

Juvenile group sex offenders: a comparison of group leaders and followers

Authors:
'T HART-KERKHOFFS Lisette A., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 26(1), January 2011, pp.3-20.
Publisher:
Sage

This article explores the characteristics of juveniles who have committed group sexual offenses. The study aimed to investigate the role of the leaders versus followers and to compare both groups on levels of psychopathology, intelligence, and psychosocial and offense-related characteristics. The participants were group sex offenders who had been referred by the police to the Dutch child protection agency. There were a total of 89 participants with a mean age of 14.9 years; 23 of the participants were classified as leaders and 66 as followers. Psychopathology, intelligence, and psychosocial and offense-related characteristics were assessed by means of standardised instruments, and criminal careers of the participants were ascertained from official judicial records. Although leaders and followers were similar on many characteristics, some differences were found. The followers reported using excessive force more frequently than leaders. Furthermore, leaders reported more emotional problems, whereas followers were characterised by higher levels of problems in the social relational domain. The article concludes that juvenile group sex offenders should be considered a group with substantial mental health needs. The absence of some expected differences between leaders and followers could be due to the method of classification or because group offending constitutes a dynamic process without clearly defined roles for individuals.

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