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Journal article Full text available online for free

Psychiatric morbidity among sentenced prisoners: prevalence study in Iran

Authors:
ASSADI Seyed Mohammad, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 188(2), February 2006, pp.159-164.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study investigates the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in Iranian prisoners. Through stratified random sampling, 351 prisoners were interviewed using the clinical version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM–IV Axis I Disorders and the Psychopathy Checklist: Screening Version. The majority (88%) of prisoners met DSM–IV criteria for lifetime diagnosis of at least one Axis I disorder and 57% were diagnosed with current Axis I disorders. Opioid dependence (73%) had the highest prevalence among lifetime diagnoses, whereas major depressive disorder (29%) was the most common current diagnosis. Psychopathy was recorded in 23%. Prevalence rates of psychiatric disorders were significantly different among offence categories. The results suggest that a substantial burden of psychiatric morbidity exists in the prison population of Iran, with treatment challenges that appear to be different from those observed in inmates in Western countries.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Mental health survey of the adult population in Iran

Authors:
NOORBALA A. A., et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 184(1), January 2004, pp.70-73.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

No national data on the prevalence of mental disorders are available in Iran. Such information may be a prerequisite for efficient national mental health intervention. Through random cluster sampling, 35 014 individuals were selected and evaluated using the 28-item version of the General Health Questionnaire. A complementary semi-structured clinical interview was also undertaken to detect learning disability ('mental retardation'), epilepsy and psychosis. About a fifth of the people in the study (25.9% of the women and 14.9% of the men) were detected as likely cases. The prevalence of mental disorders was 21.3% in rural areas and 20.9% in urban areas. Depression and anxiety symptoms were more prevalent than somatisation and social dysfunction. The interview of families by general practitioners revealed that the rates of learning disability, epilepsy and psychosis were 1.4%, 1.2% and 0.6%, respectively. Prevalence increased with age and was higher in the married, widowed, divorced, unemployed and retired people. Prevalence rates are comparable with international studies. There is a wide regional difference in the country, and women are at greater risk.

Journal article

Psychiatric practice in Iran and the UK

Authors:
HASHEMI Nazir, LONDON Mervyn
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 27(5), May 2003, pp.190-191.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

More than any other area of medicine, psychiatry is influenced greatly by the cultural setting in which it is practised. Iran and the UK have similar-sized populations, but are very different in many other respects. The opportunity arose to compare psychiatric practice in these two countries when one of the authors spent 3 months visiting mental health services at a UK centre

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