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Journal article

The sociocultural context of the European Early Promotion Project

Authors:
DRAGONAS Thalia, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 7(1), February 2005, pp.32-40.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Describes the sociocultural settings and relevant health care services within which the European Early Promotion Project was conducted, in order to render the interpretation of study results more meaningful and justify cross-cultural differences. Greece, Cyprus and Serbia are characterised by lower social expenditure and welfare provision and higher poverty rates than the UK and, especially, Finland, the latter having achieved an advanced welfare provision system. Large differences also exist among participating countries in child mental health and primary care services. Finland and the UK have made the biggest advances in promotional work with families, while Greece, Cyprus and Serbia present, to smaller or larger degree, deficiencies in health service infrastructure and their ability to follow social, economic and scientific advances in the area of maternal and child wellbeing. Part of a special issue on the EEPP.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Book

Evaluation of comprehensive care of the mentally ill: the transition from mental hospital care to extramural care of the mentally ill in European Community Countries

Editors:
FREEMAN Hugh, HENDERSON John
Publishers:
Gaskell, Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
220p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article

Patients' characteristics and treatment outcome in a group-analytic psychotherapeutic community

Authors:
TZIOTZIOU Anna, et al
Journal article citation:
Therapeutic Communities: the International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 26(3), Autumn 2005, pp.245-260.
Publisher:
Association of Therapeutic Communities

This study aimed to record the characteristics of all 816 patients treated in the Psychotherapeutic Community of the Open Psychotherapy Centre (OPC) from 1980 to 1999 and the discussion of the parameters which influence outcome. It is a retrospective study, based mainly on archives of the therapeutic sector of the OPC. The data recorded concerns the epidemiological characteristics: demographic, and the psychiatric clinical. The findings indicate some factors which are statistically correlated to the outcome, such as previous hospitalization, duration of therapy, medication, diagnosis and gender. Finally a patients profile is described, based on those characteristics which are the most common.

Journal article

Narratives about their children by mothers hospitalized on a psychiatric unit

Authors:
SAVVIDOU Ioanna, et al
Journal article citation:
Family Process, 42(3), 2003, pp.391-402.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Mothers hospitalised in psychiatric units often have to separate themselves from their children either temporarily during hospitalisation, or permanently after a loss of custody. However, many studies have shown that mothering remains important for them. This Greek study interviewed 20 women, inpatients on a psychiatric unit and mothers of 3.5-18-year-old children, recording their narratives about their children and exploring their thoughts and understanding of the concepts of motherhood and mental illness. The study also explored the way in which the mother-child dyad interacted with the family and its social context. Most mothers had a consistent and coherent narrative about their children and they had certain expectations of them. The mother-child bond was strong, even when the children had been removed from their mothers custody. However, mothers were facing great difficulties with their partner and with the broader family context. Also, the social discourses regarding mental illness, (e.g., violence and incapability for mothering), were extremely oppressive for these women. They felt that they were the victims of societal attitudes even before they became pregnant. These findings suggest the importance of listening to the voices of these women; acknowledging their competence in the therapeutic context; involving them with their families, and in legal and social contexts; and in planning supportive programmes for them.

Book

Key issues in cross-cultural psychology: selected papers from the Twelfth International Congress of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology held in Pamplona-Iruna, Navarra, Spain

Editors:
GRAD Hector, BLANCO Amalio, GEAORGAS James
Publisher:
Swets and Zeitlinger
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
386p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Comparative study looking at a wide range of psychological issues worldwide. Contains papers divided into 6 sections: conceptual and methodological issues; consequences of acculturation; cognitive processes; values; social psychology; and personality, developmental psychology, and health psychology.

Journal article

Psychological abuse among older persons in Europe: a cross-sectional study

Authors:
MACASSA Gloria, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Aggression Conflict and Peace Research, 5(1), 2013, pp.16-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

There is evidence to suggest that the rate of elder abuse in all its forms is growing. However, because of the difficulty of measuring it, psychological abuse may be underestimated. This cross sectional study used data collected in 2009 as part of the survey “Elder abuse: a multinational prevalence survey, ABUEL”. The participants were 4,467 randomly selected persons aged 60-84 years (2,559 women, 57.3 per cent) from seven EU countries (Germany, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, Portugal, Spain, Sweden). Participants answered a structured questionnaire either face-to-face or a mix of interview/self-response. The overall prevalence of psychological abuse was 29.7 per cent in Sweden, 27.1 per cent in Germany; 24.6 per cent in Lithuania and 21.9 per cent in Portugal. The lowest prevalence was reported in Greece, Spain and Italy with 13.2 per cent, 11.5 per cent and 10.4 per cent, respectively. Similar tendencies were observed concerning minor/severe abuse. The Northern countries (Germany, Lithuania, Sweden) compared to Southern countries (Greece, Italy, Portugal, Spain) reported a higher mean prevalence of minor/severe abuse (26.3 per cent/11.5 per cent and 12.9 per cent/5.9 per cent, respectively). Most perpetrators (71.2 per cent) were spouses/partners and other relatives (e.g. children). The analyses indicate that being from Greece, Italy, Portugal and Spain was associated with a lower risk of psychological abuse. Low social support, living in rented housing, alcohol use, frequent health care use, and high scores in anxiety and somatic complaints were associated with increased risk of psychological abuse.

Journal article

Removing children from the care of adults with diagnosed mental illnesses - a clash of human rights?

Author:
PRIOR Pauline
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 6(2), 2003, pp.179-190.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Health and social services providers throughout Europe are increasingly aware of the possibility of litigation from service users arising from the application of a human rights perspective to public service provision. Presents an analysis of ECHR cases related to breaches of human rights that occurred when children were taken into care from families in which one or both parents had a diagnosed mental illness. The issues raised by these cases include the following: how to ensure that the right to family life is protected for adults with mental illnesses: how to ensure access and opportunities for parents to continue bonding with children in care; and how to avoid damaging children while giving time for a proper assessment of the care situation.

Journal article

Promotion and prevention in child, adolescent and young people mental health: the Greek experience of participation in the mental health network programme of the European Commission

Authors:
KOLAITIS Gerasimos, TSIANTIS John
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 5(3), August 2003, pp.31-35.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

In 1997 the European Commission established the Mental Health Promotion Network to seek out, disseminate and promote best practice in mental health promotion and the prevention of mental disorders. The Network has commissioned a number of projects including two projects addressing the promotion of mental health and prevention of mental disorders in children and adolescents. Anticipated results included the establishment of criteria to identify good practice, development of a European database of good practice and widespread dissemination of good practice that could be implemented throughout the Community. Discusses the involvement and experiences of the staff employed in one organisation, from Greece, who have participated in the work Network, and highlights some of the difficulties faced and lessons learnt from participation in a multi-national project.

Journal article

Parental mental health/illness and children's well-being: implications for the educational services

Author:
BIBOU-NAKOU I.
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 5(1), February 2003, pp.6-15.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This article is part of a pilot European project, funded by the European Union (Daphne Project 2000), dealing with parental mental illness and the children's welfare and needs. The research aimed to obtain the views of teachers working in primary education in Greece on the identification of children who live with a mentally ill parent and collaborating with specialist services to support them in school and deal effectively with their needs. A combination of focus group discussions and individual responses to a case vignette were used. The results fund that although teachers were able to identify risks and protective factors in the cases of early parental mental illness, there was a lack of early identification mechanisms in schools and an absence of a shared understanding of relevant issue across services and agencies. The results are discussed in relation to school-based prevention initiatives that empower teachers to feel they can contribute to change in their school as well as in their own classroom practice.

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