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Journal article

The mental health of young people aging out of care and entering adulthood: Exploring the evidence from England and France

Authors:
STEIN Mike, DUMARET Annick-Camille
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 33(12), December 2011, pp.2504-2511.
Publisher:
Elsevier

This article reviews the evidence from England and France on the mental health of young people ageing out of care and into adulthood. It is the first comparative review of the two countries and concentrates on the evidence on the mental health of young people in the general population, young people living in care, young people aging out of care, and young adults. The article shows the high levels of psychological adversity of young people entering car, and the high rates of mental health problems of young people in care compared with the general population of young people. It highlights the increased risk of mental and physical problems at the time of ageing out of care, and the general improvement in longer-term outcomes for young adults, although some continue to have serious mental health problems. In conclusion, the article argues that interventions across the life course of young people are needed in both countries.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Book

Evaluation of comprehensive care of the mentally ill: the transition from mental hospital care to extramural care of the mentally ill in European Community Countries

Editors:
FREEMAN Hugh, HENDERSON John
Publishers:
Gaskell, Royal College of Psychiatrists
Publication year:
1991
Pagination:
220p.,tables,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London
Journal article Full text available online for free

Transition from child to adult mental health services: a French retrospective survey

Authors:
SCHANDRIN Aurelie, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Training Education and Practice, 11(5), 2016, pp.286-293.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: Adolescents and young adults’ mental health problems are an important health issue. However, the current organisation of the care pathway is not robust enough and transition between child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) and adult mental health services (AMHS) has been identified as a period of risk. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach: A retrospective survey was conducted in Montpellier University Hospital concerning transitions organised between CAMHS and AMHS between 2008 and 2009. The aim was to assess if transitions met four criteria identified in literature as warranting an optimal transition. Findings: In total, 31 transitions were included. Transition was accepted by AMHS in 90 per cent of cases but its organisation was rarely optimal. Relational continuity and transition planning were absent in 80 per cent of cases. The age boundary of 16 often justified the triggering of the transition regardless of patient’s needs. Discontinuity was observed in 48 per cent of transition cases, with an average gap of three months without care. Psychiatrists reported difficulties in working together. Finally, at the moment of the survey (one to three years later), 55 per cent of patients were lost to follow-up. Research limitations/implications: This is a retrospective study on a small sample but it reveals important data about transition in France. Practical implications: Transition process should include collaborative working between CAMHS and AMHS, with cross-agency working and periods of parallel care. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Prevalence rate of DSM mental disorders among adolescents living in residential group homes of the French child welfare system

Authors:
BRONSARD Guillaume, et al
Journal article citation:
Children and Youth Services Review, 33(10), October 2011, pp.1886-1890.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The rate of mental disorders in children and young people in the child welfare system worldwide is known to be very high. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of some major mental disorders among adolescents living in a residential group home in France, and the distribution of these disorders by gender. The participants included 183 adolescents living in residential group homes in the county of Bouches-du-Rhône. A structured psychiatric Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children was used to assess diagnoses of the following over the previous 6 months: anxiety disorder; major depression; conduct disorder; eating disorder; enuresia; psychosis screen; and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. The existence of suicide attempts during the lifetime of each child was also assessed. The results indicated that 48.6% of the participants had at least one psychiatric disorder during the last 6 months, and 23% reported lifetime suicide attempts. Females were more affected than boys with 64.9% having at least one disorder compared to 36.8% of boys. The article concludes that the prevalence of mental disorders in adolescents living in French residential group homes is 2.5 to 3.5 times higher than in the overall population.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Channel crossing

Author:
HUNTER Mark
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 16.09.04, 2004, pp.42-43.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Reports on an Anglo-French partnership, between Medway Council and the Maison de l'Initiative in the Grande Synthe region, which is pioneering 'cultural mediation' as a way to combat exclusion among ethnic minorities. The project is funded until July 2005 by the European Union's Interreg IIIA programme. In Medway the project is focusing on improving access to social services for people from ethnic minorities with mental health needs, physical disabilities and learning difficulties. In France the mediators are targeting employment issues for ethnic minorities.

Journal article

Service provision for elderly depressed persons and political and professional awareness for this subject: a comparison of six European countries

Author:
BRAMSFELD Anke
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 18(5), May 2003, pp.392-401.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Under-treatment of depression in late-life is a subject of rising public health concern throughout Europe. This study investigates and compares the availability of services for depressed elderly persons in Denmark, France, Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK. Additionally, it explores factors that might contribute to an adequate services supply for depressed elderly people. Review of the literature and guide supported expert interviews. Analysis of the practice of care provision for depressed elderly persons and of indicators for political and professional awareness, such as university chairs, certification processes and political programmes in gerontopsychiatry. Only Switzerland and the UK offer countrywide community-oriented services for depressed elderly persons. Clinical experience in treating depression in late-life is not regularly acquired in the vocational training of the concerned professionals. Indicators suggest that the medical society and health politics in Switzerland and the UK regard psychiatric disease in the elderly more importantly than it is the case in the other investigated countries. Service provision for depressed elderly persons seems to be more elaborated and better available in countries where gerontopsychiatry is institutionalised to a greater extend in the medical society and health politics.

Journal article

Repetition of parasuicide: risk factors in general hospital referred patients

Authors:
BATT Agnes, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 7(3), June 1998, pp.285-297.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Reports on a study of subjects referred to the accident and emergency ward of a University Hospital in France following a suicide attempt. Provides an epidemiological description of the patients then describes the cohort according to previous suicidal history and thirdly according to the occurrence of early repeats during the study period. Results found that major repeaters are over 18 and patients with clusters of episodes are mostly adults. The use of risk factors in the setting up of care-strategy policies is discussed.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Violence in mental health: some European response to community care

Author:
SMITH Philip
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Europe, 4(1), 1997, pp.51-54.
Publisher:
Russell House

Summarises the results of a brief questionnaire on how other European countries manage the community care of violent people with mental health problems.

Journal article

When work kills

Authors:
WATERS Sarah, KARANIKOLOS Marina, MCKEE Martin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 15(4), 2016, pp.229-234.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the rising public health phenomenon of workplace suicide drawing on comparative insights from the French and UK contexts. France has experienced what the media describes as a “suicide epidemic” in the workplace, with rising numbers of employees choosing to kill themselves in the face of extreme pressures at work. Design/methodology/approach: The paper uses a comparative approach drawing on insights from the French context, in which workplace suicide is legally and officially recognised, to shed critical light on the UK context where workplace suicide remains a hidden phenomenon. Findings: Whilst in France, workplace suicide is treated as an urgent public health phenomenon and data on suicides are collected centrally, in the UK, despite a deterioration in working conditions, suicide is not recognised in legislation and data are not collected centrally. Unless society recognises and document rising workplace suicides, it will not be possible to deal with profound human consequences for suicidal individuals, their families and society more widely. Research limitations/implications: Research on workplace suicides in the UK and many other national contexts is hampered by fragmentary statistical data on this phenomenon. Practical implications: The paper calls for greater recognition, analysis and monitoring of workplace suicide in the UK. Suicide should be included in the list of workplace accidents that are reported to the authorities for further investigation. In a context where workplace conditions are deteriorating, society need to recognises the profound human costs of these conditions for the individual employee. Social implications: The paper has important implications for the contemporary workplace in terms of the contractual relationship between employer and employee. Originality/value: Workplace suicide is an urgent, yet under-researched phenomenon. The paper brings a comparative and multidisciplinary perspective to bear on this phenomenon. (Edited publisher abstract)

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