Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 75

Journal article

Geel's deal

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 11.7.91, 1991, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reports on a small town in Belgium with a very long history of adult placement of people with mental health problems.

Journal article

Recovery capital: what enables a sustainable recovery from mental health difficulties?

Author:
TEW Jerry
Journal article citation:
European Journal of Social Work, 16(3), 2013, pp.360-374.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

There is increasing international interest in recovery approaches in mental health; and this connects with an emerging focus within European social work around promoting capability and sustainability. Research at a population level would suggest that social factors rather than medical interventions are the main determinants of recovery from mental health difficulties. However, this is not yet reflected in social work practice, which can still be dominated by biomedical perspectives and a focus on risk management. Drawing upon and extending analyses of social and other forms of capital, this paper outlines the basis for a new paradigm for mental health social work that is specifically oriented towards enabling the development of personal efficacy and social capability. Such an approach is explicitly focused on achieving longer-term sustainability rather than shorter-term problem solving. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Employment and mental health: assessing the economic impact and the case for intervention

Authors:
MCDAID David, et al
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
29p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

The importance of employment and its links with mental health are summarised and the European policy context described. The report then asks what the consequences of poor mental health for economic activity are, if a trend in productivity losses over time can be seen and what we know about employment rates for people with mental health problems. Barriers to employment, the economic case for helping such people remain in the workforce, assessing the cost effectiveness of interventions to this end, legislative and policy actions, and the way forward are discussed.

Book

Economics, mental health and policy: an overview

Authors:
KNAPP Martin, et al
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
41p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report summarises findings presented at Mental Health Economics European Network events in London and Brussels in September and December 2007. It highlights funding issues, assesses the merits of the case for investment in promotion and prevention, looks at how economic incentives might influence the balance of care, reflects on some implications of poor mental health for employment and productivity, focuses on further development of the European Service Mapping Schedule and, as an example, considers the challenges to be faced in two  countries, Turkey and Hungary, currently undergoing rapid economic and social transition.

Journal article

Psychological research on homelessness in Western Europe: a review from 1970 to 2001

Authors:
PHILPOT Pierre, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Issues, 63(3), 2007, pp.483-504.
Publisher:
Wiley

This article summarizes definitions employed, observed prevalence, the socio-demographic characteristics, and the physical and mental health status of the homeless in Western Europe. Research pertaining to the causes of homelessness and the societal response to the problem are also reviewed, and the ethical and methodological questions raised by European researchers are debated. A critical analysis of the largely descriptive European research is provided, and some noteworthy exceptions are described. The authors also discuss a number of promising theoretical models, including those that focus on learned helplessness, social strain, and social stress.

Book Full text available online for free

Improving the mental health of the population: towards a strategy on mental health for the European Union: green paper

Author:
EUROPE. Health and Consumer Protection Directorate-General
Publisher:
European Commission
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
25p.
Place of publication:
Brussels

The Green paper aims to launch a public consultation on how better to tackle mental illness and promote mental wellbeing in the EU, in line with the mandate for action at Community level. If confirmed, the initiative should lead to the development of a Commission proposal for an EU-strategy on mental health in late 2006.

Journal article

Sign of progress or confusion? a commentary on the European Commission Green Paper on mental health

Author:
PRIEBE Stefan
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 30(8), August 2006, pp.281-282.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The paper came out in October 2005 following the World Health Organization European Ministerial Conference on Mental Health in the same year. It has the noble intention ‘to launch a debate with the European institutions, governments, health professionals, stakeholders and other sectors... about the relevance of mental health for the EU [European Union], the need for a strategy at EU-level and its possible priorities’. It portrays ‘mental ill health’ as a growing problem in the EU with wide economic consequences, and suggests preventive action, social inclusion of people with mental illness and more data on mental health across the EU. In the paper, the Commission invited all potential stakeholders in mental healthcare in the EU to contribute to a consultation process, which ended in May 2006.

Journal article

The state of mental health in old-age across the ‘old’ European Union: a systematic review

Authors:
RIEDEL-HELLER S.G., BUSSE A., ANGERMEYER M.C.
Journal article citation:
Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 113(5), May 2006, pp.388-401.
Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing

This review of epidemiological studies conducted in 13 of the 15 countries of the pre-enlargement European Union finds that mental disorders in old age are common, with the most serious threats posed by dementia and depression. While it is clear that the prevalence of dementia increases with age, the pattern with regard to depression is unclear. Evidence on other mental health disorders, including those associated with substance use, mild cognitive impairment, psychotic syndromes, anxiety and somatoform disorders is much less abundant, making it difficult to come to conclusions. In addition, the lack of comparable data means that it is impossible so far to make judgements about differences in the prevalence rates of particular disorders across geographical and cultural boundaries.

Journal article

Mental health promotion in the workplace: a European perspective

Author:
KUHN Karl
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 5(1), March 2006, pp.29-34.
Publisher:
Emerald

This paper reviews current evidence on the negative mental health impacts of employment, the key factors in work-related stress and European policies for promoting mental health in the workplace. It ends with some examples of good practice in workplace mental health promotion drawn from a range of European countries.

Journal article

The sociocultural context of the European Early Promotion Project

Authors:
DRAGONAS Thalia, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 7(1), February 2005, pp.32-40.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Describes the sociocultural settings and relevant health care services within which the European Early Promotion Project was conducted, in order to render the interpretation of study results more meaningful and justify cross-cultural differences. Greece, Cyprus and Serbia are characterised by lower social expenditure and welfare provision and higher poverty rates than the UK and, especially, Finland, the latter having achieved an advanced welfare provision system. Large differences also exist among participating countries in child mental health and primary care services. Finland and the UK have made the biggest advances in promotional work with families, while Greece, Cyprus and Serbia present, to smaller or larger degree, deficiencies in health service infrastructure and their ability to follow social, economic and scientific advances in the area of maternal and child wellbeing. Part of a special issue on the EEPP.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts