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Journal article

Discharges from Section 3 of the Mental Health Act 1983; changes in practice

Author:
SACKETT Kate
Journal article citation:
Health Trends, 28(2), 1996, pp.64-67.
Publisher:
Office for National Statistics

With the introduction of the 1983 Mental Health Act (England and Wales) the initial period of detention for the treatment order was reduced from 12 months to 6 months, while the shorter order for assessment, or assessment followed by treatment remained at 28 days. This article reports the results of research undertaken at Coney Hill Hospital to determine any change in practice in discharge since the introduction of the Act. Factors considered included: the length of detention; renewals; appeals to managers or mental health review tribunal; delay between appeal and hearing; discharging agent; and whether patients remained in hospital informally after section discharge. Results found that there was a trend towards earlier discharge. Concludes that these changes could be due to long-term trends predating the 1983 Act, or may reflect continued efforts to comply with the Code of Practice.

Book

Social services responses to psychiatric emergencies: summary of the iterim report

Authors:
HUXLEY Peter, KERFOOT Michael
Publisher:
University of Manchester. Department of Psychiatry
Publication year:
1992
Pagination:
8p.,diags.
Place of publication:
Manchester

Survey of 82 local authorities in England and Wales summarizing the types of services available.

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Personal budgets: risk enablement and mental health

Author:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2012
Place of publication:
London

This film showcases the work of Stockport Council and Pennine Care NHS Trust. As part of their risk enablement strategy for personal budgets and mental health they established a risk enablement panel as a last resort for discussing final support plans for people considered to be at risk. However, in the three years since the panel was established, they have only used it twice. Stockport has also committed to a culture change where staff and service users are able to openly discuss positive risk taking and concerns about risk. This has resulted in people with mental health problems (even those with more complex needs who use a budget managed by a third party) being able to use their personal budgets more creatively. They are experiencing positive outcomes such as improved confidence and self-determination and greater levels of activity. They also have more opportunities to take up volunteering and training for employment.

Journal article

Variation in rates of inpatient admissions and lengths of stay experienced by adults with learning disabilities in England

Authors:
JAMES Elaine, HATTON Chris, BROWN Mark
Journal article citation:
Tizard Learning Disability Review, 22(4), 2017, pp.211-217.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyse rates of inpatient admissions for people with learning disabilities in England and to identify factors associated with higher rates of inpatient admission. Design/methodology/approach: Secondary analysis of data submitted as part of the Transforming Care programme in England. Findings: 2,510 people with learning disabilities in England were inpatients on 31st March 2016. Findings indicate that people with learning disabilities are at risk of higher rate of inpatient admission than can be explained by prevalence within the general population; this risk may be associated with areas where there are higher numbers of inpatient settings which provide assessment and treatment for people with learning disabilities. Research limitations/implications: Variability in the quality of the data submitted by commissioners across the 48 Transforming Care Plan areas mean that greater attention needs to be paid to determining the validity of the common reporting method. This would improve the quality of data and insight from any future analysis. Practical implications: The study’s findings are consistent with the hypothesis that geographical variations in the risk of people with learning disabilities being admitted to inpatient services are not consistent with variations in prevalence rates for learning disability. The findings support the hypothesis that building alternatives to inpatient units should impact positively on the numbers of learning disabled people who are able to live independent lives. Originality/value: This is the first study which examines the data which commissioners in England have reported to NHS England on the experience of people with learning disabilities who are admitted as inpatients and to report on the possible factors which result in higher rates of inpatient admission. (Publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Evaluation of the Shared Lives Mental Health Project

Authors:
HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
62
Place of publication:
Bath

An evaluation of a project to support the development of Shared Lives as an option for people with mental ill health. The project has supported seven local Shared Lives schemes to develop, demonstrate and market a financially viable and commission ready approach to Shared Lives mental health support, and to generate learning about what works. Drawing on data collected through a mixed methods evaluation approach, this report describes the impact and learning from the project. The evaluation has found evidence of the positive impact that having support through a Shared Lives arrangement – whether it is day support, short breaks or long-term arrangements – can have on the lives of people with mental ill health. There are examples of improvements in general wellbeing and increased participation in community life, as well as specific examples where people’s mental health has stabilised and hospital stays have been prevented. The impact goes beyond those in Shared Lives arrangements to family members of those being supported, Shared Lives carers and their families and communities that people are supported in. Although some of the seven project schemes experienced challenges and frustrations and in some cases growth was slow, all saw increases in the number of new arrangements for people with mental ill health and all saw increases in the number of Shared Lives carers offering mental health support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Immigration Removal Centres in England: a mental health needs analysis

Authors:
DURCAN Graham, STUBBS Jessica, BOARDMAN Jed
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
49
Place of publication:
London

Sets out the findings of a rapid mental health needs assessment across Immigration Removal Centres (IRCs) in England. Ten IRCs were assessed to explore the wellbeing of detainees, the services in place and the perspectives of people working with those detained. The report finds that people detained in IRCs often face significant challenges to their mental health and that levels of distress, problems with living conditions and lack of both certainty and liberty, all had a significant impact on the wellbeing of those detained. The most commonly reported problem was depressed mood or anxiety, and the most severe reported problems were hallucinations or delusions. The report finds some positive examples of services, such as psychological therapy, wellbeing groups and the support provided by chaplains. But it also finds that most detainees felt that they were not listened to, not taken seriously, or treated as if they were lying. Similarly, some staff reported that it was easy to become assimilated into a culture which disbelieved detainees. In addition, mental health care staff face significant challenges working in IRCs where people may be removed at short notice and face high levels of uncertainty about their future. The report highlights the multifaceted wellbeing needs of people in immigration detention, and makes recommendations to address this. It calls for greater lengths to ensure that those with a marked vulnerability are not detained; mental health awareness training for all IRC staff; 24/7 access to crisis care; and greater provision of alternative support such as peer support and relaxation groups. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Transportations of space, time and self: the role of reading groups in managing mental distress in the community

Authors:
SHIPMAN Judith, McGRATH Laura
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(5), 2016, pp.416-421.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: The practice of reading and discussing literature in groups is long established, stretching back into classical antiquity. Although benefits of therapeutic reading groups have been highlighted, research into participants’ perceptions of these groups has been limited. Aims: To explore the experiences of those attending therapeutic reading groups, considering the role of both the group, and the literature itself, in participants’ ongoing experiences of distress. Method: Eleven participants were recruited from two reading groups in the South-East of England. One focus group was run, and eight individuals self-selected for individual interviews. The data were analysed together using a thematic analysis drawing on dialogical theories. Results: Participants described the group as an anchor, which enabled them to use fiction to facilitate the discussion of difficult emotional topics, without referring directly to personal experience. Two aspects of this process are explored in detail: the use of narratives as transportation, helping to mitigate the intensity of distress; and using fiction to explore possibilities, alternative selves and lives. Conclusions: For those who are interested and able, reading groups offer a relatively de-stigmatised route to exploring and mediating experiences of distress. Implications in the present UK funding environment are discussed. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Factors associated with experienced discrimination among people using mental health services in England

Authors:
HAMILTON S., et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 25(4), 2016, pp.350-358.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Background: Research has found considerable variation in how far individuals with a diagnosis of mental illness experience discrimination. Aims: This study tested four hypotheses: (i) a diagnosis of schizophrenia will be associated with more discrimination than depression, anxiety or bipolar disorder; (ii) people with a history of involuntary treatment will report more discrimination than people without; (iii) higher levels of avoidance behaviour due to anticipated discrimination will be associated with higher levels of discrimination and (iv) longer time in contact with services will be associated with higher levels of discrimination. Method: Three thousand five hundred and seventy-nine people using mental health services in England took part in structured telephone interviews about discrimination experiences. Results: A multiple regression model found that study year, age, employment status, length of time in mental health services, disagreeing with the diagnosis, anticipating discrimination in personal relationships and feeling the need to conceal a diagnosis from others were significantly associated with higher levels of experienced discrimination. Conclusion: Findings suggest that discrimination is not related to specific diagnoses but rather is associated with mental health problems generally. An association between unemployment and discrimination may indicate that employment protects against experiences of discrimination, supporting efforts to improve access to employment among people with a diagnosis of mental illness. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Home comforts

Author:
McGINLEY John
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Supported housing combined with personalised support service can play a vital role in helping people with mental illness in their recovery. This article looks at examples of supported housing provided by Sanctuary Supported Living and how providing personalised support geared to the individual provides clients with a step-down approach to help them move towards independent living. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Breadwinners

Author:
PENFOLD Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The Better Health Bakery provides people overcoming mental health issues with an opportunity to do work in a thriving business, gaining new skills and move closer to employment. It was created by the social enterprise arm of the charity Centre for Better Health based in the London Borough of Hackney. This article reports on how the bakery manages the trainee baker' 12 week placements, the role of volunteers within the bakery, and how they help their trainee bakers when the placement ends. (Edited publisher abstract)

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