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Journal article

Prevalence of mental health problems among children placed in out-of-home care in Denmark

Authors:
EGELUND Tine, LAUSTEN Mette
Journal article citation:
Child and Family Social Work, 14(2), May 2009, pp.156-165.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper concerns the prevalence of mental health problems among children in family foster and residential care within a Danish context. All children, born in Denmark in 1995, who are or formerly have been placed in out-of-home care (n= 1072), are compared with a group of vulnerable children of the same age, subjected to child protection interventions but living at home (n= 1457, referred to as the 'in home care children'), and to all contemporaries who are not child protection clients (n= 71 321, referred to as the 'non-welfare children'). Prevalence data are established on the basis of national administrative register data, including data on psychiatric diagnoses of the children, and on survey data scoring children in out-of-home care, in home care children, and non-welfare children by means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results show that 20% of children in out-of-home care have at least one psychiatric diagnosis compared to 3% of the non-welfare children. Almost half of the children in care (48%) are, furthermore, scored within the abnormal range of SDQ, compared to 5% of the non-welfare children.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Norse know-how

Author:
VALOIS Natalie
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 11.05.06, 2006, pp.28-29.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A social worker describes her visit to two Danish centres for traumatised refugees.

Journal article

Combined effects of physical illness and comorbid psychiatric disorder on risk of suicide in a national population study

Authors:
QIN Ping, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 204(6), 2014, pp.430-435.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Background: People with physical illness often have psychiatric disorder and this comorbidity may have a specific influence on their risk of suicide. Aims: To examine how physical illness and psychiatric comorbidity interact to influence risk of suicide, with particular focus on relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Method: Based on the national population of Denmark, individual-level data were retrieved from five national registers on 27 262 suicide cases and 468 007 gender- and birth-date matched living controls. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Results: Both suicides and controls with physical illness more often had comorbid psychiatric disorder than their physically healthy counterparts. Although both physical and psychiatric illnesses constituted significant risk factors for suicide, their relative timing of onset in individuals with comorbidity significantly differentiated the associated risk of suicide. While suicide risk was highly elevated when onsets of both physical and psychiatric illness occurred close in time to each other, regardless which came first, psychiatric comorbidity developed some time after onset of physical illness exacerbated the risk of suicide substantially. Conclusions: Suicide risk in physically ill people varies substantially by presence of psychiatric comorbidity, particularly the relative timing of onset of the two types of illness. Closer collaboration between general and mental health services should be an essential component of suicide prevention strategies. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Childhood IQ in relation to later psychiatric disorder. Evidence from a Danish birth cohort study

Authors:
BATTY G. David, MORTENSEN Erik L., OSLER Merete
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 187(2), August 2005, pp.180-181.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Studies examining the relationship between early-life IQ and the risk of subsequent psychiatric disorder in adulthood are scarce. In the present investigation, the childhood IQ scores of 7022 singleton-born Danish males were linked to psychiatric hospital discharge records in adulthood. IQ scores were inversely related to the risk of total psychiatric illness, with the highest levels apparent in the lowest scoring IQ group. Adjusting for paternal occupational social class and birth weight had only a small attenuating effect. Low childhood IQ may have an aetiological role in the development of adult total psychiatric disorder.

Journal article

Socialpsykiatri - en ny mde at se socialt arbejde p! (Social psychiatry - a new way to view social work!)

Author:
ANDERSEN Carsten
Journal article citation:
Nordisk Sosialt Arbeid, 14(2), 1994, pp.131-143.
Publisher:
Universitetsforlaget AS

In all the Nordic countries there has been a development in the field of psychiatry, away from the large treatment institutions towards locally and socially based psychiatric work. In the individual Nordic countries this work is organised in different ways. In Denmark the development of the psychiatric organisation has tried to get away from centralized institutional psychiatry towards a more decentralized district psychiatry and social psychiatry. The expression 'social psychiatry' is often accused of mixing medical psychiatric treatment with social interventions or suggesting that social work can also be a form of psychiatric treatment. Social work is social work and social care directed towards people with mental disorders. This work is based on specialised psychiatric knowledge and basis social methods and concepts.

Journal article

The perspectives of people who use mental health services engaging with arts and cultural activities

Authors:
JENSEN Anita, STICKLEY Theodore, EDGLEY Alison
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(3), 2016, pp.180-186.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a study of arts engagement for mental health service users in Denmark. Design/methodology/approach: The study was completed at Hans Knudsen Instituttet, Denmark. It involved analysis of emerging themes from semi-structured interviews with six participants who had participated in a structured visit to the National Gallery (Statens Museum for Kunst) in Denmark. Findings: Multiple benefits for people who use mental health services engaging in arts activities are reported. Arts activities are described as a central component of everyday life; a way of life and a significant factor in getting through the day. Barriers are identified in the interdisciplinary working between the museum educator and participants. Social implications: This study identifies that the participants benefited from taking part in the arts/cultural activity. Findings also suggest that if museums are offering activities to people who use mental health services they should equip staff with training designed to support appropriate ways of working with this group. This interdisciplinary activity offers a relatively untapped potential arena of support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article Full text available online for free

Unemployment and psychological distress among young adults in the Nordic countries: a review of the literature

Authors:
RENEFLOT Anne, EVENSON Miriam
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Social Welfare, 23(1), 2014, pp.3-15.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This article reviews Nordic research, published from 1995 and onwards, on the relationship between unemployment and mental health among young adults. Cross-sectional, longitudinal and time-series studies are included. Cross-sectional studies show that the unemployed experience more mental health problems than the non-unemployed. Leaving unemployment is associated with increased well-being. Economic problems, feelings of shame and poor social support increase the likelihood of psychological distress. The longitudinal studies show that unemployment increases the risk of psychological distress and attempted suicide, after initial mental health status and confounding factors are accounted for. The relationship remains significant when time-invariant characteristics of the individuals are controlled for. The time-series studies found no relationship between unemployment and suicide, but levels of psychological distress were found to vary with changes in the labour market. This relationship remained significant after excluding the non-employed, indicating that unemployment trends have effects beyond those directly associated with unemployment. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Different approaches to understanding patients in general practice in Denmark: a qualitative study

Authors:
DAVIDSEN Annette Sofie, REVENTLOW Susanne
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 39(3), June 2011, pp.209-226.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Common mental health problems constitute a significant element of the workload of general practitioners (GPs), with estimates varying from 25% to 50%. The proposed treatment for many of these disorders is some form of psychotherapy, either alone or combined with pharmacotherapy. This qualitative interview and observation study aimed to explore Danish GPs' approaches to emotional problems and mental disorders in 'talking therapy' and in routine consultations. Semi-structured interviews were held with 14 GPs, and observations were made during 3 consecutive days in the practices of 4 of the participants. Different typical approaches were identified and could be described using the concept of mentalisation. Five participants had a mentalising approach in which they offered many sessions of talking therapy and tried to understand patients’ problems as conjoined with their life situations. Six participants had a limited mentalising approach; 3 of these described how they often lost engagement in therapies. The remaining 3 participants were satisfied with the biomedical professional identity and did not engage in patients' emotional problems. The individual participant's approach in talking therapy was mirrored in routine consultations. The article concludes that training a mentalising or reflective stance might promote more uniform therapeutic approaches to patients' emotional problems.

Journal article

Betting on a different horse: a qualitative analysis of mental health in health promotion policies

Authors:
SOLIN Pia, LEHTO Juhani
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 3(3), September 2004, pp.8-17.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Aims to analyse the position and role of mental health in health promotion policy. Policy documents from Finland, Sweden, Denmark, the Netherlands, England and Portugal indicate that, although mental health is considered a serious issue, it is problematic in policy terms. Arguments make the case for the importance of mental health within the health promotion agenda, including the classification of mental illness as a public health problem, socio-economic and individual costs of mental health problems, and the view that mental wellbeing is a crucial element of overall health. However, problems of definition and measurement, and a traditional focus on treatment and care, continue to make mental health promotion problematic for policy makers.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

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