Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 7 of 7

Journal article

Mental health, employment and gender: cross-sectional evidence in a sample of refugees from Bosnia-Herzegovina living in two Swedish regions

Authors:
BLIGHT Karin Johansson, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Science and Medicine, 62(7), April 2006, pp.1697-1709.
Publisher:
Elsevier

Large regional differences regarding access to employment have been observed amongst persons from Bosnia-Herzegovina coming to Sweden in 1993–1994. This has led to questions about the role of mental health. To explore this further, postal survey questionnaires were distributed to a community sample (N=650) that was stratified and, within strata, randomly selected from a sampling frame of persons coming to Sweden from Bosnia-Herzegovina in 1993–1994. Four hundred and thirteen persons returned the questionnaire providing a response rate of 63.5%. The aim was to increase knowledge about the relationship between mental health and employment in the chosen population. The main mental health outcome measure was the Göteborg Quality of Life instrument from which 360 respondents were grouped according to low or high symptom levels. Data were cross tabulated against background variables such as age, gender and occupational status, and then tested using binary logistic regression. Binary logistic regression revealed unemployed men but not women, and women who had been working for longer periods during 1993–1999, to be associated with high levels of symptoms of poor mental health. Women living in the urban region were also overrepresented in the high symptom group. These findings indicate that, job occupancy is important to the health of men in the study. However, for the women, further understanding is needed, as job occupancy at some level as well as living in the urban region appear to be associated with poor mental health.

Journal article

A new dawn: the changing face of mental health services in Bosnia and Herzegovina

Author:
MAGLAJLIC Reima Ana
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Care, 4(12), August 2001, pp.401-404.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Bosnia and Herzegovina is gradually pulling itself back from the destruction of the 1992-1996 war. To replace the destroyed mental hospitals the World Bank provided funding for a network of community mental health centres across the country. Educational initiatives have been introduced to provide staff - including, importantly, nurses and social workers - with the necessary training and skills to work in the community setting.

Book

A shattered world: the mental health needs of refugees and newly arrived communities

Authors:
RAJ Meena, READING John
Publisher:
CVS Consultants
Publication year:
1999
Pagination:
88p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Report aiming to: describe the kinds of mental health problems that are common among refugees; provide information on causal factors; focus on issues of access to health care; describe mental health issues from the perspective of two refugee communities; detail a range of strategies to improve mental health; and to provide case studies of some of the services that have been developed.

Journal article

War damage

Author:
CARLISLE Daloni
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 30.8.95, 1995, p.20.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

The Refugee Council is appealing for mental health workers to help Bosnian refugees in the UK to overcome the trauma of their experiences.

Journal article

Mental health consequences in men exposed to sexual abuse during the war in Croatia and Bosnia

Authors:
LONCAR Mladen, HENIGSBERG Neven, HRABAC Pero
Journal article citation:
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 25(2), February 2010, pp.191-203.
Publisher:
Sage

There are many studies exploring different categories of rape and the impacts they have on the individuals and society. These studies usually emphasise men as the perpetrators, and women as the victims. This research project concentrates on the sexual abuse of men during the war in Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina, and presents detailed information from 60 victims of such crimes. Aiming to define key attributes of sexual abuse of men in war as well as consequences it had on the victims, this study uses a method of structured interview, where the statement of each victim was recorded. Victims were generally exposed to physical torture of their genitals, psycho-sexual torture and physical abuse, and reported that the most common symptoms of traumatic reactions were: sleep disturbances; concentration difficulties; night-mares and flashbacks; feelings of hopelessness; and different physical stress symptoms such as constant headaches, profuse sweating, and tachycardia. In addition to rape and sexual abuse, most of the victims were heavily beaten. The authors conclude that the number of sexually abused men during the war must have been much higher than reported, but regrettably no new study was authorised by the Croatian Ministry of Health.

Journal article

Assessing adolescent mental health in war-affected societies: the significance of symptoms

Authors:
JONES Lynne, KAFETSIOS Konstantinos
Journal article citation:
Child Abuse and Neglect, 26(10), October 2002, pp.1059-1080.
Publisher:
Elsevier

The aim of this article was to compare the use of self-report symptom checklists with qualitative methods for assessing adolescent psychological well-being in a war-affected society. A school-based sample of three hundred and thirty seven 13- to 15-year-olds from two communities on opposite sides of the Bosnian conflict, completed two checklists. It was found that self-report checklists may be useful as a public health measure to assess the prevalence of psychological distress in war affected areas, but they are not an adequate means of clinical screening. Checklists used in combination with other qualitative approaches make it possible to identify those in need and avoid unnecessary pathologising.

Journal article

Empowering the people

Author:
JACKSON Catherine
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Care, 3(2), October 1999, pp.42-45.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Mental health service users in the emerging democracies of eastern and central Europe are beginning to make their voices heard. This article looks at self-advocacy and user organisations from former Communist countries, including Hungary, Bulgaria, Croatia and Bosnia/Herzegovena.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts