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Journal article

Geel's deal

Author:
BRANDON David
Journal article citation:
Social Work Today, 11.7.91, 1991, pp.22-23.
Publisher:
British Association of Social Workers

Reports on a small town in Belgium with a very long history of adult placement of people with mental health problems.

Journal article

One size fits all? The social construction of dis-employ-abled women

Authors:
VANDEKINDEREN Caroline, et al
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 27(5), August 2012, pp.703-716.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

In Europe, welfare states attempt to increase efforts to employ economically inactive citizens, such as disabled people, according to the norm of economic productivity. This article is based on an evaluation of a labour-market training programme for 17 women with mental health problem in a social workplace in Belgium. The study explored the retrospective insider perspectives on the work aspirations of the women involved in the programme to identify critical dynamics in their high drop-out from the social workplace. The central findings provide evidence of a prevalent one-size-fits-all discourse in these practices wherein complex and interrelated processes of discrimination take place that are based on both disability and gender. The findings demonstrate that the social workplace functions as a male bastion, in which the oversized overalls that women are forced to wear are symbolically relevant. In conclusion, the authors discuss and challenge the dominance of the neo-liberal norm of economic productivity and employability.

Journal article

Reinventing the employable citizen: a perspective for social work

Authors:
ROETS Griet, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 42(1), 2012, pp.94-110.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Modern economies try to employ economically inactive individuals, such as people with chronic mental health problems, through a wide range of strategies. This article, based on a project in Flanders, Belgium, in which social workers are charged with managing labour market training programmes, explores the support elements available for people with mental health problems. It aims to transfer the Belgian experience to the British context in an analysis of the various notions and interpretations of citizenship in social practices. In the analysis, the authors differentiate between notions and experiences of normative and relational citizenship. They argue that a relational approach to citizenship enables social workers in Belgium to make use of their discretionary space to negotiate employment trajectories in a flexible way. In conclusion, social workers are in a critical position to influence social policy makers.

Book

Asylum in the community

Editors:
CARRIER John, TOMLINSON Dylan
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
1996
Pagination:
238p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
London

Based on an empirical examination of psychiatric care in the past and present with an international focus. Critically assesses the concept of asylum and shows how it can be operationalised for services outside the hospital. Uses this analysis to establish the key elements of asylum that should be considered in developing contemporary community services for people with mental health problems.

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

Psychosocial and psychiatric factors associated with adolescent suicide: a case-control psychological autopsy study

Authors:
PORTZKY Gwendolyn, AUDENAERT Kurt, van HEERINGEN Kees
Journal article citation:
Journal of Adolescence, 32(4), August 2009, pp.849-862.
Publisher:
Academic Press

Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide adolescent victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Results showed that suicide victims had been exposed more frequently to suicidal behaviour by friends and through media and experienced more relational problems in the past year. Suicidal communication was less frequently reported in suicide victims than in controls and when communication did occur, it was less often directed towards parents. Treatment of psychiatric disorders was significantly less found in suicide victims. Psychiatric control patients were more likely to have comorbidity of psychiatric disorder, conduct disorder, delinquency or academic difficulties. This study showed significant differences between young suicide victims and psychiatric controls for life events, exposure, communication and treatment. These results also suggest that more symptoms and more externalizing behaviour can be observed in psychiatric control patients which could indicate more warning signals of possible psychiatric problems for the environment, which could result in more help-seeking behaviour and treatment.

Journal article

Neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia: cross-sectional analysis from a prospective, longitudinal Belgian study

Authors:
ENGELBORGHS Sebastiaan, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 20(11), November 2005, pp.1028-1037.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Given the rather limited knowledge on profiles of neuropsychiatric symptoms (behavioural and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia, BPSD) in several degenerative dementias, we designed a prospective study of which we here present the baseline data.  Diagnosed according to strictly applied clinical diagnostic criteria, 205 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) , 29 with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) , 39 with mixed dementia (MXD)  and dementia 23 with Lewy bodies (DLB) were included. All patients underwent a neuropsychological examination and behavioural assessment by means of a battery of scales (Middelheim Frontality Score (MFS), Behave-AD, Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia). In AD and MXD, activity disturbances and aggressiveness occurred in more than 80% of the patients. With a prevalence of 70%, apathy was very common whereas delusions and hallucinations were rare in FTD patients. Frequently used behavioural assessment scales like the Behave-AD systematically underestimated BPSD in FTD whereas the MFS displayed high sensitivity for frontal lobe symptoms. Hallucinations discriminated DLB patients from other dementias. A high prevalence of disinhibition (65%) in DLB pointed to frontal lobe involvement.  Behavioural assessment may help differentiating between different forms of dementia, further stressing the need for the development of new and more sensitive behavioural assessment scales. By means of the MFS, frontal lobe involvement was frequently observed in DLB. As 70% of FTD patients displayed apathy, prevalence was about two times higher compared to the other disease groups, meanwhile indicating that apathy is frequently observed in dementia, irrespective of its etiology.

Journal article

The legend and lessons of Geel, Belgium: a1500-year-old legend, a 21st-Century model

Authors:
GOLDSTEIN Jackie L., GODEMONT Marc M. L.
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 39(5), October 2003, pp.441-458.
Publisher:
Springer

Geel, Belgium, is the home of a legendary system of foster family care for people with mental illness. The current status of Geel's modern system of integrated community care and the 700-year history of this system (including the 10-year-long, international, multi-disciplinary Geel Research Project) are described. As a case study, Geel offers a microcosmic encapsulation of major issues related to mental illness. Though these issues have been dealt with across time and in all places, here they are contained in a single community. This is a case study can help other communities to identify significant factors that contribute to successful community mental health programmes.

Journal article

Gaining insight from experience: lessons from a Flemish employment programme

Authors:
AUDENHOVE Chantal Van, LISSENS Guido
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 5(1), February 2001, pp.14-21.
Publisher:
Emerald

The Flemish ECHO project is a joint initiative of some Flemish mental health services in close co-operation with the LUCAS research institute. This article describes the social context of vocational rehabilitation in Flanders, and the way that the project was organised by the partners in the Flemish ECHO network. Also describes the method of working in the project and offers some conclusions based on the scientific evaluation of the project.

Journal article

Behavioral symptoms in mild cognitive impairment as compared with Alzheimer's disease and healthy older adults

Authors:
VAN DER MUSSELE Stefan, et al
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, 28(3), 2013, pp.265-275.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a clinical concept that describes patients who are in an intermediate state between normal aging and dementia. It does not generally affect their activities of daily living but complex instrumental functions may be minimally impaired. Although behavioural symptoms are common in MCI they are not included in the concept. The aim of this study was to characterise behaviour in MCI compared with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy older patients. The data were drawn from the baseline of a longitudinal study of behavioural symptoms of dementia and MCI. The study population, consisting of 270 MCI, 402 AD patients, and 108 healthy controls from Antwerp, underwent a battery of tests and assessments. Moderate-to-severe behavioural symptoms were present in 13% of MCI patients, compared with 39% in AD patients and 3% in controls. The general severity of behavioural symptoms was intermediate between controls and AD patients. The three most common symptoms in MCI patients were aggressiveness (49%), affective disturbance (45%), and anxiety (38%); in AD patients, they were aggressiveness (60%), activity disturbances (54%), and psychosis (40%). Overall the prevalence and severity of frontal lobe symptoms, aggressiveness, activity disturbances, and delusions was intermediate between normal aging and AD and the severity of physically non-aggressive, verbally agitated behaviour and the severity of depressive symptoms were also intermediate.

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