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Journal article

Dual diagnosis discourse in Victoria Australia: the responsiveness of mental health services

Authors:
ROBERTS Bridget M., MAYBERY Darryl
Journal article citation:
Journal of Dual Diagnosis, 10(3), 2014, pp.139-144.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

In recent decades, psychiatric services have been challenged to be more responsive to patients’ coexisting problems, in particular those concerning substance use. In Australia this has been referred to as a “No Wrong Door” approach. This qualitative study involved a review of the research literatures, analysis of policy documents, and interviews with 19 key informants in a case study of the State of Victoria, Australia. Informants were from a range of professional backgrounds, including medical, nursing, social work, and a variety of experience in the relevant service sectors. The analysis resulted in two broad themes surrounding the implications of dual diagnosis discourse for the mental health sector. The first involves progress regarding the concept of No Wrong Door with subthemes including interprofessional cultural conflicts, intersectoral professional status issues, terminology, problem definition, perspectives on serious mental illness, the role of the client, and pharmacological treatment. The second overarching theme focuses upon informants’ thoughts on future directions for the sector and highlights divided opinion on the implications of dual diagnosis discourse for the mental health service and social care systems. While the perspectives on system change and multiple issues such as resource concerns and cultural clashes are presented here, the informants in this study also gave clear guidance for the future of dual diagnosis work in the mental health sector (e.g., focusing on orienting services toward consumer strengths and recovery), along with recommendations for future research. This paper contributes to the small body of qualitative research on the history and course of efforts to develop appropriate practice in mental health services with regard to patients who have substance use problems and other mental health disorders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Sheltered employment in five member states of the Council of Europe: Austria, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Switzerland

Authors:
SAMOY Erik, WATERPLAS Lina
Publisher:
Council of Europe
Publication year:
1997
Pagination:
67p.,bibliogs.
Place of publication:
Strasbourg

Comparative study looking at the situation of sheltered employment in the twelve Member States of the European Union. The data for each country is grouped under the following headings: institutional context; target population; access to sheltered employment; characteristics of the people in sheltered employment; and a discussion of the topics currently under debate around sheltered employment in each country.

Journal article

Caring for children of parents with mental health problems - a venture into historical and cultural processes in Europe

Authors:
SOLANTAUS Tytti, PURAS Dainius
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 12(4), November 2010, pp.27-36.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This article discusses the European initiative Work Package 5 (WP5), a part of the CAMHEE programme, which was designed to bring children and families with parental mental illness onto the European agenda. Parental mental health problems are a major risk for children’s adverse development. Intergenerational mental health issues often leads to social marginalisation and exclusion, which constitutes a serious social problem. WP5 participants included Austria, Bulgaria, Finland, Lithuania, Norway and Romania. The WP5 emphasised that it is important for every country to learn what the legal, human rights, and service and life situation is for these children and families and to take preventive and promotion action. The paper suggests that, to avoid further stigmatisation, awareness campaigns and training of professionals should capitalise on resilience and support for children and parenting rather than on risks. Psychiatric services for adults should respond to the needs for care and support of the patients' children. Finally, changes in society are needed, including redirecting legislation from restrictive measures towards promotion and prevention.

Journal article

Patient advocacy in psychiatry: the Austrian and Dutch models

Author:
FORSTER Rudolf
Journal article citation:
International Social Work, 41(2), April 1998, pp.155-168.
Publisher:
Sage

Advocacy has emerged as a key concept in the process of the modernisation of western psychiatry. This article combines a general discussion of the advocacy approach with an analysis of its application in practice. Two projects which are among the most advanced projects of professional advocacy in European mental health are used for discussion.

Journal article

Understanding depression in adolescents: a dynamic psychosocial web of risk and protective factors

Authors:
KASSIS Wassilis, ARTZ Sibylle, WHITE Jennifer
Journal article citation:
Child and Youth Care Forum, 46(5), 2017, pp.721-743.
Publisher:
Springer

Background: Adolescent depression has been recognised as a complex problem that presents a global public health challenge. Left undetected and untreated, depression can significantly reduce quality of life. Objective: The main purpose of this paper is to re-visit risk and protective factors for depression in adolescents with a specific focus on exploring the individual, familial, and social contexts of depression (especially high and very high depression levels) in a multi-country sample of youth in order to see if these factors are mitigated by cultural location. Methods: Questionnaire data from a cross-sectional study of a randomly selected sample of 5149 middle-school students from four EU-countries (Austria, Germany, Slovenia, and Spain) was used. Applying variance analysis, the prediction strength for the observed risk and protective factors were examined. Results: In all participating countries the authors show that in for both male and female adolescents, depression is linked to a broad range of interactive individual, and social protective and risk factors, such that even if the contribution of a single factor is low but still significant and this factor’s prediction strength is low or moderate, taken together, the cumulative prediction strength of these factors yields a remarkably similar coefficient of determination of 42–49% in all samples. Conclusions: The authors have established a significant and relevant combination of the individual and social multifactorial risk and protective factors that characterise depression in adolescents of both genders, no matter their country of location and with that, the authors call for a multifaceted and comprehensive approach to mental health assessment, prevention and intervention. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Child murder and gender differences – a nationwide register-based study of filicide offenders in two European countries

Authors:
PUTKONEN Hanna, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Psychiatry and Psychology (The), 21(5), October 2010, pp.637-648.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

The killing of one’s child is an engendered crime, and offending mothers and fathers have been found to differ in both situational characteristics and in mental health issues. This study aimed to investigate gender differences in filicide offenders' psychiatric diagnoses, history, and other mental health-related variables. The study covered all 124 filicide offenders in Austria and Finland in 1995-2005. All registered-based data was gathered for these cases. There were 79 female and 45 male offenders. The findings showed that both genders had an equally challenged childhood. The filicidal fathers were older than the mothers, with mean ages 37.5 and 31.6 years, respectively. Filicidal fathers committed suicide at the crime scene more often than the mothers (38% vs. 15%). Of the examined parents, fathers were diagnosed more often with substance abuse/dependence (39% vs. 2%) and mothers with a psychotic disorder (35% vs. 13%). During the year preceding the crime, 25 (32%) of the mothers and 13 (29%) of the fathers had sought help for mental health-related problems. The article concludes that service providers need specific strategies to support parents in distress, especially when depressive symptoms are present.

Book Full text available online for free

Access to specialised victim support services for women with disabilities who have experienced violence. Comparative Research Report: Austria, Germany, Iceland and United Kingdom

Authors:
WOODIN Sarah, SHAH Sonali
Publisher:
University of Leeds. Centre for Disability Studies
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
59
Place of publication:
Leeds

This comparative report presents the results of research into violence against women with disabilities for the project 'Access to specialised victim support services for women with disabilities who have experienced violence', which was funded by the EU Daphne III programme. It is based on research which took place in Austria, Germany, Iceland and United Kingdom between 2013 and 2014 and involved 187 women with disabilities (106 women in focus groups and 81 women in individual interviews). The research included women with mobility and sensory impairments, women with intellectual impairments, women with mental health conditions and women with multiple impairments. Specialised service providers assisting women who have experienced violence also took part in this study (602 responses to an online survey and 54 individual interviews with representatives from services). Research findings are discussed in the following areas: perceptions and understanding of violence; experiences of violence and support over the life course; women's knowledge about their rights; knowledge about use of services; experience of barriers; helpful aspects of support. Suggestions for improvement and good practice are also included. The report highlights the need for support services that recognise the type and extent of violence against disabled women need to be developed, and for both mainstream and specialised strategies to be pursued. (Edited publisher abstract)

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