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Journal article

A medical research council initiative in mental handicap

Author:
FRASER W.I.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 166, June 1995, pp.703-704.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Discusses the need for a medical research council in mental handicap.

Journal article

Accepting voices

Author:
-
Journal article citation:
Open Mind, 65, October 1993, pp.18-19.
Publisher:
MIND

Reports on 'Accepting Voices', to be published by MIND and launched at their annual conference, which gives a non-medical explanation for hearing voices and provides unique approaches for coping with them. Also discusses the Hearing Voices Network, which has a membership of over 350 voice-hearers and other interested people in the UK.

Journal article

The post(hu)man always rings twice: theorising the difference of impairment in the lives of people with ‘mental health problems’

Authors:
VANDEKINDEREN Caroline, ROETS Griet
Journal article citation:
Disability and Society, 31(1), 2016, pp.33-46.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis,

A vital debate in British disability studies concerns the question of how impairment can be theorised, taking place between those who claim a critical realist ontology and those who argue for a critical social ontology. Recently, this discussion on impairment issues seems to merge with the agenda of the newly emerging perspective of critical disability studies. In contrast to the recent claim of Vehmas and Watson in Disability & Society that critical disability theorists only engage in a relativistic deconstruction of impairment, as critical disability scholars the authors explore the recent work of Braidotti who addresses a difference between a deconstructive anti-humanist stance and an affirmative post-humanist turn. Inspired by our empirical research, the authors theorise the difference of impairment in the lives of people with ‘mental health problems’ that can imply, in theoretical and in practical real-life terms, both a limitation and a potential that matters (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Sporting chance

Author:
ANDREWS Crispin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July/August 2015, pp.10-11.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Sport can have real benefits for people experiencing mental illness. In October 2014 the then coalition government launched Get Set to Go, a scheme to encourage people with mental health problems to play sport. The scheme is running across a number of English regions, with project being run by local Mind offices. This article looks at the benefits of sport for people with mental health problems and describes a project that uses cricket to develop skills in target setting, focus, cooperation and social skills. The article also highlights the importance of ensuring the right people are providing coaching at such projects. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Rain, rain, go away

Author:
MOURANT Andrew
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September/October 2014, pp.8-9.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article discusses the impact flooding can have on people's mental health, looking at some of the findings from recent research and what can be done to help. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The grass on the other side

Author:
LESTON Jean
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 135, September/October 2005, pp.16-17.
Publisher:
MIND

The author discusses some of the advantages and disadvantages of home working for people with mental health problems.

Journal article

The relationship between personal debt and mental health: a systematic review

Authors:
FITCH Chris, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 16(4), 2011, pp.153-166.
Publisher:
Emerald

A systematic review was undertaken to identify peer reviewed literature in English from 1980 to 2009 in order to evaluate the evidence on the extent to which personal debt impacts on mental health, and mental health on personal debt. Database searches resulted in the identification of 50 papers meeting the inclusion criteria. These were appraised by the research team and this article presents the results of the analysis. It discusses research on the temporal relationship between debt and mental health, whether the type and size of debt matter, the role of age, income or assets in the relationship between indebtedness and mental health, the process through which debt, mental health and other factors interacted, debt and self-harm or suicide, and compulsive buying. The review found that methodological limitations made it difficult to definitively demonstrate whether indebtedness causes poor mental health, and that existing research either uses definitions of debt which lack specificity or definitions of mental health which are too broad, but that plausible data exist which indicate that indebtedness may contribute to the development of mental health problems. The authors suggest topics for further research, and note that those working with people with debt problems need to be aware of the potential risk of reduced mental well-being or mental disorder.

Journal article

Employing strong support

Author:
DENT Emma
Journal article citation:
Health Service Journal, 1.12.11 supplement, 2011, p.7.
Publisher:
Emap Healthcare

Having a job can promote mental health recovery, yet stigma often means disclosure of a mental health problem can lead to someone being forced out of the job or finding it hard to gain employment. The benefits of work retention schemes and individual placement and support schemes are discussed.

Journal article

The pain and the possibility: the family recovery process

Author:
SPANIOL LeRoy
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 46(1), February 2010, pp.482-485.
Publisher:
Springer

The onset of a mental illness is a traumatic experience for all the members of a family. While the mental illness in their family member may be life long, family members can experience their own recovery from the trauma, just as their family member with a mental illness can experience recovery. This article will describe the family recovery process.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Transforming mental health care for older veterans in the Veterans Health Administration

Authors:
KARLIN Bradley E., ZEISS Antonette M.
Journal article citation:
Generations, 34(2), Summer 2010, pp.74-83. Published online.
Publisher:
American Society on Aging

Older adults often lack familiarity with mental health symptoms and services and may hold negative beliefs about mental health care that can prevent them from seeking treatment. The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) operates the largest and one of the most elaborate mental health care systems in the nation and perhaps the world. The recent history of the system is described. One successful new model for providing mental health care to older veterans that has been nationally implemented in the VHA is the integration of a full-time mental health provider on each of the more than 130 VA home-based primary care (HBPC) teams. Another major psychogeriatrics initiative involves the integration of a full-time mental health provider in VA community living centers (CLC), formerly designated as nursing home care units. It is critical that increasing national attention be devoted to the mental health needs of older Americans and that policies and processes be developed to extend the reach and potential impact of mental health care for older adults.

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