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BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: QS39

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2013
Place of publication:
Manchester

This quality standard covers the diagnosis and management of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children aged 3 years and older, young people and adults. The standard comprises seven statements that describe high quality care for service users. These are: children and young people with symptoms of ADHD are referred to a specialist for an assessment; adults with symptoms of ADHD who have not had a diagnosis in childhood are referred to a specialist for an assessment; adults who had ADHD when they were younger and who still have symptoms of ADHD are referred to general adult psychiatric services; parents and carers of children and young people with symptoms of ADHD who meet NICE eligibility criteria are offered a referral to a parent training programme to help them manage their child’s behaviour; children and young people with moderate ADHD are offered a referral to a psychological group treatment programme; people with ADHD who are starting medication have their initial medication dose adjusted by a specialist, who should also check how well the medication is working; and people who are taking medication to treat ADHD have their medication reviewed by a specialist at least once a year. (Edited publisher abstract)

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Anxiety disorders: QS53

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2014
Place of publication:
Manchester

This quality standard covers the identification and management of anxiety disorders in primary, secondary and community care for children, young people and adults. These include generalised anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and body dysmorphic disorder. The standard sets out the following four quality statements: people with a suspected anxiety disorder receive an assessment that identifies whether they have a specific anxiety disorder, the severity of symptoms and associated functional impairment; people with an anxiety disorder are offered evidence-based psychological interventions; they are not prescribed benzodiazepines or antipsychotics unless specifically indicated; and people receiving treatment for an anxiety disorder have their response to treatment recorded at each treatment session. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Standards for low secure services

Author:
ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS. Quality Network for Forensic Mental Health Services
Editors:
TUCKER Sarah, et al
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists' Centre for Quality Improvement
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
34
Place of publication:
London

The Quality Network for Forensic Mental Health Services was launched in 2006 with an initial focus on medium secure services. The Network has developed this third consultation draft of ‘Standards for low secure services’ directly from the ‘Low secure services: good practice commissioning guide: consultation draft’ (Department of Health, February 2012). In addition some standards from the ‘Implementation criteria for recommended specification: adult medium secure units’ (second edition CCQI 105) have been included. These standards have been developed with the purpose of forming the basis of the self- and peer-review questionnaires for the Quality Network for Forensic Mental Health Services’ low secure services self- and peer-reviews. The standards provide an accessible way for services to actively engage in ongoing service development towards implementing the Department of Health recommendations. This report outlines the development of the standards, the model of care, therapeutic and service environments, workforce, governance and equalities issues. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

The Comparative guide to the Care Standards Act 2000: parts I and II with the Registered Home Act 1984 (nursing homes and mental nursing homes); for inspectors, legal advisors and providers

Authors:
WITTON Marion, GRANT Neil
Publisher:
M.Witton & Bevan Ashford
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
44p.
Place of publication:
Bristol

The Care Standards Act 200 replaces the Registered Homes Act 1984. It provides for the registration authorities to be the newly created National Care Standards Commission for England, and the National Assembly for Wales. This comparative guide sets out the new requirements under the Care Standards Act Parts I and II alongside the previous requirements of the Registered Homes Act with a clear explanation of the changes. Note is made where there was no previous equivalent, or where previous requirements have been removed. Some requirements under both the previous and the new regime are set out in regulations but this guide focuses on the Acts. The sections of the Act are set out in the same order as the Care Standards Act Parts I and II. Précis of each section are provided in boxes.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health core skills education and training framework

Authors:
SKILLS FOR HEALTH, SKILLS FOR CARE, HEALTH EDUCATION ENGLAND
Publishers:
Skills for Health, Health Education England, Skills for Care
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
86
Place of publication:
Bristol

Framework setting out the core skills and knowledge which the health and social care workforce need to provide high-quality mental health services. The Framework was commissioned by the Department of Health, and aims to support consistent mental health education and training across a variety of service settings, providing opportunities for joint education and training. The framework classifies key skills and knowledge into three tiers: general mental health awareness; skills required for staff that have some regular contact with people with mental health issues; and skills needed to care for people with complex mental health needs. It covers 18 subject areas, which include: promoting wellbeing, establishing positive relationships, understanding prevention, recovery focused approaches, and using technology to deliver effective support. Each subject area include details of the target audience, learning outcomes, and links to relevant guidance, legislation and National Occupational Standards. The framework covers the care of people of all ages, including children, young people, working-age adults and older people. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Learning disabilities: identifying and managing mental health problems: QS142

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2017
Place of publication:
London

NICE quality standard covering the prevention, assessment and management of mental health problems in people with learning disabilities in all settings, including health, social care, education, and forensic and criminal justice. The standard describes what high-quality care looks like in five priority areas. The five quality statements for people with learning disabilities and mental health problems are: for annual health checks to include a review of mental health problems; that mental health assessments are carried out by a professional with expertise in mental health problems; that people with learning disabilities and a serious mental illness have a key worker to coordinate their care; that any psychological interventions are tailored to the preferences of people with learning disabilities and mental health problems; and annually documenting the reasons for continuing antipsychotic drugs. Each quality statement includes the rationale for the statement and suggestions for quality measures that can be used to monitor performance to the standard. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Mental health core skills education and training framework: consultation draft

Authors:
SKILLS FOR HEALTH, HEALTH EDUCATION ENGLAND, SKILLS FOR CARE
Publishers:
Skills for Health, Health Education England, Skills for Care
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
76
Place of publication:
Bristol

A draft education and training framework, commissioned by the Department of Health, which sets out the core skills and knowledge which the health and care workforce need to apply in order to deliver quality mental health services. It aims to describe common skills and knowledge that are transferable across different types of service provision. Specialist skills and knowledge are outside the scope of the framework. The framework will determine the minimum standard for mental health education and training and help to measuring if education and training satisfies these standards. The core skills and knowledge are defined at 3 levels: Level 1: knowledge for roles that require general mental health awareness; Level 2: knowledge and skills for roles that will have some regular contact with people with mental health issues; and Level 3: knowledge and skills for those working with/caring for people with mental health needs. The framework includes expected learning outcomes, and will be aligned to relevant quality and regulatory standards. It will be applicable to health and care employers and also educational organisations which train students who will be employed in the health and car workforce. The framework is being developed in parallel with a similar framework for learning disabilities. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

The variation in family background amongst young homeless shelter users in Denmark

Author:
BENJAMINSEN Lars
Journal article citation:
Journal of Youth Studies, 19(1), 2016, pp.55-73.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

This article analyses variation in the family background of young homeless people in a cohort of young Danes. The study is based on administrative data for individuals who were 18 years old in 2007 and their parents. Homelessness is measured by shelter use over a five-year period. Data also cover education, employment, mental illness, substance abuse problems and placement outside home in childhood for the young persons, and education, employment, civil status, mental illness and substance abuse problems for their parents. A cluster analysis identifies two groups, each comprising half of the young shelter users. In the first group, social marginalisation is transmitted between generations, as most parents have low education and mental illness or substance abuse problems, and are unemployed. In contrast, the young people in the second group come from wider socioeconomic backgrounds, with few of their parents having mental illness or substance abuse problems. These young people develop psychosocial problems and become homeless without strong predictors from their family background. Amongst the young shelter users from families with severe social problems a higher share are in the Not in Education, Employment or Training group. They also have more shelter stays, compared to young shelter users from families with fewer social problems. (Publisher abstract)

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Self-harm: QS34

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2013
Place of publication:
Manchester

This quality standard covers the initial management of self-harm and the provision of longer-term support for children and young people (aged 8 years and older) and adults (aged 18 years and older) who self-harm. The standard comprises eight statements that describe high-quality care for people who have self-harmed. These focus on: compassion, respect and dignity; initial assessments; comprehensive psychosocial assessments; monitoring; safe physical environments; risk management plans; psychological interventions; and moving between services. (Edited publisher abstract)

BookDigital Media Full text available online for free

Depression in adults quality standard: QS8

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
Publisher:
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Publication year:
2011
Place of publication:
Manchester

This quality standard covers the assessment and clinical management of persistent subthreshold depressive symptoms, or mild, moderate or severe depression in adults (including people with a chronic physical health problem). It describes markers of high-quality, cost-effective care that, when delivered collectively, should contribute to improving the effectiveness, safety and experience of care for people with depression in the following ways: preventing people from dying prematurely; enhancing quality of life for people with long-term conditions; helping people to recover from episodes of ill health or following injury; ensuring that people have a positive experience of care; and treating and caring for people in a safe environment and protecting them from avoidable harm. (Edited publisher abstract)

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