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Journal article

The relationship between personal debt and mental health: a systematic review

Authors:
FITCH Chris, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 16(4), 2011, pp.153-166.
Publisher:
Emerald

A systematic review was undertaken to identify peer reviewed literature in English from 1980 to 2009 in order to evaluate the evidence on the extent to which personal debt impacts on mental health, and mental health on personal debt. Database searches resulted in the identification of 50 papers meeting the inclusion criteria. These were appraised by the research team and this article presents the results of the analysis. It discusses research on the temporal relationship between debt and mental health, whether the type and size of debt matter, the role of age, income or assets in the relationship between indebtedness and mental health, the process through which debt, mental health and other factors interacted, debt and self-harm or suicide, and compulsive buying. The review found that methodological limitations made it difficult to definitively demonstrate whether indebtedness causes poor mental health, and that existing research either uses definitions of debt which lack specificity or definitions of mental health which are too broad, but that plausible data exist which indicate that indebtedness may contribute to the development of mental health problems. The authors suggest topics for further research, and note that those working with people with debt problems need to be aware of the potential risk of reduced mental well-being or mental disorder.

Journal article

Age at onset and cognition in schizophrenia: meta-analysis

Authors:
RAJJI T.K., ISMAIL Z., MULSANT B.H.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 195(4), October 2009, pp.12-14.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This study aimed to compare cognitive deficits in individuals with youth-onset and late-onset schizophrenia with those in adults with first-episode schizophrenia. Publications selected from a literature search of 29 databases from 1980 to 2008 had to include a healthy control group and analyse individuals diagnosed with schizophrenia or a related disorder and individuals with first-episode, youth-onset or late-onset schizophrenia separately. Data were extracted and cognitive data was aggregated into 22 cognitive measures. The conclusions were that individuals with youth-onset schizophrenia have severe cognitive deficits, whereas those with late-onset schizophrenia have some relatively preserved cognitive functions. This supports the view that severity of the disease process is associated with different ages at onset. In addition, the cognitive pattern of people with late onset schizophrenia suggests that their deficits are specific rather than solely as a result of ageing and related factors. Longitudinal and controlled studies will be necessary to address questions of specific deficits versus preserved cognitive functions and to advance understanding of the relationship between the disease process underlying schizophrenia, cognition, age at onset, duration of illness, ageing and associated factors.

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Introduction to the research on: the effectiveness of supported housing and accommodation for people with mental health problems

Authors:
HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin, LINSKY Kate
Publisher:
National Development Team for Inclusion
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
17
Place of publication:
Bristol

A short scoping review of research into the effectiveness of supported housing and accommodation for people with mental health problems aimed at practitioners who work with people with mental health problems. For the review, searches were carried out on organisational websites and a range of databases, including Social Care Online, for UK based research published from 2000. The document provides an overview of the quantity and quality of the research and a table summarising the 20 studies reviewed with their key findings. It also provides a summary of areas identified for future research. The review finds that various models of community-based supported housing have been associated with a range of positive outcomes for people with mental health problems. These include: improved quality of life, more extensive social networks, social inclusion, reduced negative symptoms, increased participation in work and education, increased autonomy, improved self-esteem and happiness, reduced challenging behaviour, increased confidence, and relapse prevention. However, there is less known about the factors which lead to these outcomes and the characteristics that make the most effective types of support. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Scoping review of interventions supporting mothers with mental illness: key outcomes and challenges

Authors:
SUAREZ Eliana Barrios, LAFRENIERE Ginette, HARRISON Jay
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 52(8), 2016, pp.927-936.
Publisher:
Springer

Despite the fact that more than 60 per cent of women experiencing mental distress also care for dependent children, little is known about the efficacy of interventions supporting parents with mental illness. A scoping review of the literature published between 1997 and 2014 was conducted to obtain an overview of empirically evaluated interventions and to typify their outcomes. The review identified 19 publications reporting on 9 interventions. The efficacy of programs was apparent and key components used by programs were recognised. To enhance the well-being of mothers with mental illness and their children an increased knowledge transfer in this field is required. (Edited publisher abstract)

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Trauma and young offenders: a review of the research and practice literature: research summary

Authors:
LIDDLE Mark, et al
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Reports on findings from a review of research and practice literature concerning trauma in the backgrounds of young offenders. It aims to highlight what is currently known about trauma within the population of young offenders, and to identify the importance of this knowledge for effective resettlement practice. Searches were carried out using the internet and academic databases, focusing on young people up to the age of 25. The review focuses on: definitions of trauma and the different ways in which trauma has been understood in the research and practice literature; the prevalence of different types of traumatic childhood and adolescent experiences in the backgrounds of young offenders; the effects that such trauma can have on young people in the short-term, and its longer term impacts on emotional, social, and neurological development; the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour, including the extent of their capacity to comply with youth justice interventions. The evidence suggests that offenders have a disproportionate amount of childhood and adolescent trauma in their backgrounds and that some of the impacts of such trauma appear to be linked to offending behaviour. It also looks at the implications that an understanding of trauma and its effects might have for resettlement work undertaken with young custody-leavers. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Peer support roles in mental health services

Author:
CHRISTIE Louise
Publisher:
IRISS
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This Insight briefing provides an overview of peer support roles in mental health services and the role they can play in supporting both their own recovery and the recovery of other people. The briefing discusses the way peer support roles are being developed and the potential for further growth across all types of mental health services It also draws on research evidence to identify the positive impacts of peer provided support, which include hope, empowerment, social inclusion, empathy, and a reduction in the use of in-patient services. The final section looks at how peer support role can help organisations and services implement goals set by wider policy, such as the co-production of services; and adopting a strengths- and rights-based, as well as a recovery-focused approach. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Fundamental facts about mental health 2015

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH FOUNDATION
Publisher:
Mental Health Foundation
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
93
Place of publication:
London

A comprehensive summary of mental health research, providing a handbook of key facts and figures, covering all key areas of mental health. The document shows that in the UK mental health problems are responsible for the largest burden of disease – 28 per cent of the total burden, while mental health research receives only 5.5 per cent (£115 million) of total UK health research spending. One in four people experience a mental health problem in any given year and ten per cent of children and young people (aged 5-16 years) have a clinically diagnosable mental problem. Common mental health problems such as depression and anxiety are distributed according to a gradient of economic disadvantage across society with the poorer and more disadvantaged disproportionately affected from common mental health problems and their adverse consequences. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Facilitators and barriers in dual recovery: a literature review of first-person perspectives

Authors:
NESS Ottar, BORG Marit, DAVIDSON Larry
Journal article citation:
Advances in Dual Diagnosis, 7(3), 2014, pp.107-117.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The co-occurrence of mental health and substance use problems is prevalent, and has been problematic both in terms of its complexity for the person and of the challenges it poses to health care practitioners. Recovery in co-occurring mental health and substance use problems is viewed as with multiple challenges embedded in it. As most of the existing literature on recovery tends to treat recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, it is critical to assess the nature of our current understanding of what has been described as “complex” or “dual” recovery. The purpose of this paper is to identify and discuss what persons with co-occurring mental health and substance use problems describe as facilitators and barriers in their recovery process as revealed in the literature. Design/methodology/approach: The method used for this study was a small-scale review of the literature gleaned from a wider general view. Searches were conducted in CINAHL, Psych info, Medline, Embase, SweMed+, and NORART. Findings: Three overarching themes were identified as facilitators of dual recovery: first, meaningful everyday life; second, focus on strengths and future orientation; and third, re-establishing a social life and supportive relationships. Two overarching themes were identified as barriers to dual recovery: first, lack of tailored help and second, complex systems and uncoordinated services. Originality/value: The recovery literature mostly focuses on recovery in mental health and substance use problems separately, with less attention being paid in the first-person literature to what helps and what hinders dual recovery. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Assessing and treating sexual offenders with mental disorders

Authors:
LORD Alex, PERKINS Derek
Journal article citation:
Journal of Forensic Practice, 16(2), 2014, pp.94-109.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to increase our understanding of the role of mental disorder in sexual offending as well as identifying innovations in assessment and treatment with offenders who present with these typically complex risks and needs. Design/methodology/approach: The converging literatures on “good lives” and other developments in sexual offender treatment are compared with recovery from mental disorder and what is known about the particular needs and characteristics of sexual offenders with mental illness and severe personality disorder (PD). Findings: A key outcome of this review is that many mentally disordered sexual offenders have similar needs to those in prison and the community but there are particular challenges posed by severe PD, paraphilias and the relatively rare individuals whose offending is functionally linked to psychotic symptoms. Practical implications: Practical implications include the need for case formulation of complex needs related to mental disorder using direct and indirect measures of attitudes and interests. Treatment needs to be responsive to very different personality and mental health presentations as well as problems with offending and cognitive schemas. Direct functional links between mental health symptoms such as delusions and hallucinations are very rare in practice and are usually secondary to PD and sexual offending issues. In practice, treatment promoting recovery from mental disorder is highly compatible with the “good lives” approach to sexual offender treatment. Staff development, supervision and support are particularly important for staff treating mentally disordered sexual offenders. Originality/value: It is argued that mentally disordered sexual offenders are an under-researched sub-group within the wider sexual offender population. This paper brings together the relatively limited literature on treatment with examples of recent treatment innovations, multi-modal assessment approaches and reviews of research on the needs of this relatively uncommon but highly risky group. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

A family approach to delirium: a review of the literature

Author:
HALLOWAY Shannon
Journal article citation:
Aging and Mental Health, 18(2), 2014, pp.129-139.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

This literature review had the following objectives: (1) evaluate the current state of research into delirium management (prevention, identification, or treatment of delirium) with family approaches or involvement, (2) identify gaps and areas that require investigation, and (3) determine a future course of research. A comprehensive search of original research was conducted in six major databases using seven keywords in 2012. The literature search yielded a total of 2160 articles. Criteria for eligibility were met by a total of 11 articles. The articles were evaluated in regards to purpose, sample, research design, level of evidence, variables, and results. The literature review revealed that this topic is emergent and requires substantial additional research. The aspects of delirium care that researchers investigated were diverse and included bedside interventions (n = 3), screening strategies (n = 4), family education (n = 2), and care that employed multiple components (n = 2). Delirium outcomes improved significantly in two high-quality studies: one multi-component intervention and one bedside intervention program. Other noteworthy findings of lower quality studies warrant further examination. The review of the articles did not determine if the involvement of families in delirium management improves patient outcomes; however, the review revealed potential for program development and future courses of research.

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