Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 4445

Book Full text available online for free

Recovering mental health in Scotland: report on narrative investigation of mental health recovery

Authors:
BROWN Wendy, KANDIRIKIRIRA Niki
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
168p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This report is the result of what the authors describe as an innovative approach to research. By using a narrative method it states that people in recovery from long-term mental health problems are experts by experience and it reminds us that people can and do recover. The purpose of collecting recovery narratives across Scotland was to learn from each individual’s experience and identify common factors, share stories to inspire hope and offer tools and techniques for recovery among service users, carers, friends and families, service providers and the wider community, establish a Scottish evidence base of factors that help or hinder an individual’s recovery from long-term mental health problems, use the evidence to contribute to the development of policy and practice across all sectors, promoting a better understanding of what supports recovery and wellbeing, and guide and inform the work of the Scottish Recovery Network. Across the stories consistent internal and external elements could be found.

Book Full text available online for free

Scottish Recovery Network national conference 2007

Author:
THE SCOTTISH RECOVERY NETWORK
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
7p.
Place of publication:
Dundee

A report of the Scottish Recovery Network (SRN) national conference on Friday 16 February 2007 which discussed future action to promote and support recovery in Scotland is presented.

Journal article

A medical research council initiative in mental handicap

Author:
FRASER W.I.
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 166, June 1995, pp.703-704.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Discusses the need for a medical research council in mental handicap.

Journal article

Prevalence of mental health problems among children placed in out-of-home care in Denmark

Authors:
EGELUND Tine, LAUSTEN Mette
Journal article citation:
Child and Family Social Work, 14(2), May 2009, pp.156-165.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper concerns the prevalence of mental health problems among children in family foster and residential care within a Danish context. All children, born in Denmark in 1995, who are or formerly have been placed in out-of-home care (n= 1072), are compared with a group of vulnerable children of the same age, subjected to child protection interventions but living at home (n= 1457, referred to as the 'in home care children'), and to all contemporaries who are not child protection clients (n= 71 321, referred to as the 'non-welfare children'). Prevalence data are established on the basis of national administrative register data, including data on psychiatric diagnoses of the children, and on survey data scoring children in out-of-home care, in home care children, and non-welfare children by means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results show that 20% of children in out-of-home care have at least one psychiatric diagnosis compared to 3% of the non-welfare children. Almost half of the children in care (48%) are, furthermore, scored within the abnormal range of SDQ, compared to 5% of the non-welfare children.

Book Full text available online for free

Scotland’s mental health and its context: adults 2009

Authors:
TAULBUT M, PARKINSON J, CATTO S, GORDON D
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
180p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. NHS Health Scotland was commissioned by the Scottish Government to establish a core set of sustainable mental health indicators to enable national monitoring. This report provides the first ever systematic assessment of the adult population’s overall mental health. The report has three objectives: to provide a description of the state of mental health and the associated contextual factors that influence it at a single point in time, using the most recent available data, to analyse time trends for each indicator over the last decade, where possible, and to identify differences within the adult population by selected dimensions of equality, where possible.

Book Full text available online for free

Scotland’s mental health and its context: adults 2009 - briefing

Authors:
TAULBUT Martin, PARKINSON Jane, CATTO Sonnda, GORDON David
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Improving mental health is a national priority in Scotland. In December 2007, NHS Health Scotland published a framework of 54 indicators to support and promote consistent and sustainable national monitoring of adult mental health and associated contextual factors in Scotland. The first systematic assessment using these indicators was published in February 2009. This briefing covers its key points.

Book Full text available online for free

National programme for improving mental health and well-being small research projects initiative 2006: ... An exploration as to how personal narraitives are used in the promotion of recovery and social inclusion by mental health service users in Scotland

Authors:
ALTENBERGER Iris, MACKAY Rob
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Findings are presented from a study that aimed to explore and identify how personal narratives are used in Scotland to promote recovery and social inclusion by mental health service users. This study took the form of semi-structured interviews with 12 individuals in six locations across Scotland. This was followed up with a focus group discussion with four of the same individuals.

Book Full text available online for free

National programme for improving mental health and well-being: small research projects initiative 2005-06: plotting the story of recovery in Edinburgh and Scotland

Authors:
TILLEY Stephen, ASQUITH Stewart
Publisher:
Scotland. Scottish Government
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
2p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

Supporting and promoting recovery is one of the four key aims of Scotland’s National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Well-being. The Scottish Recovery Network is funded to work towards this aim. The study on which this discussion paper is based (completed mid-2006) aimed to contribute to development of recovery in Scotland through critical inquiry. Three linked methods were used: review of key local, national and international texts on experience, policy, practice and recovery-focused research, semi-structured, informal interviews with 11 key actors from the four constituencies on their perceptions of the emergence and development of ‘recovery’ and implications for implementation of a recovery agenda, and notes taken at local and national recovery events, meetings or conferences documenting content and use of recovery language in public settings.

Book

Tools for change: to help teams plan

Authors:
IN CONTROL, MENCAP
Publisher:
In Control
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
70p., CD ROM, 4 posters
Place of publication:
London

Tools for Change is a resource pack to help teams plan. It is especially useful to help teams plan for change who work in social care. As well as the planning processes, there are sections on getting to know your team better, understanding other people, and inclusion. The pack includes a written guide, and posters to help with the planning processes.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, recovery and employment

Author:
COUTTS Pippa
Publisher:
Scottish Recovery Network
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
15p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

Supporting recovery for people with long-term mental health problems includes providing people with choices and opportunities for social development and self-determination. One such opportunity, which mental health service users have requested, is for improved support to gain and retain work and employment. This paper is not a review of the literature, but aims to encourage discussion and action around supporting people with long-term mental health problems to gain and sustain suitable employment, which in 'the mental health world’ should go hand in hand with the development of recovery orientated services. The paper considers the current situation with regard to employment for people with long-term mental health problems, and why employment opportunities and supports should be given greater priority. It looks at the links between an individual’s recovery process and gaining and retaining employment, and outlines some ideas on what can be done to overcome barriers to employment and to promote the development of mentally healthy workplaces that meet people’s needs.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts