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Book Full text available online for free

Cross border transfers, cross border absconding and cross border visits under mental health law: a factsheet for practitioners

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
5p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Commission receives frequent calls on cross-border issues. These relate to planned transfers of patients, cross-border visits and cross-border absconding. Often professionals have difficulty accessing the correct statutory legislation and guidance detailing the information they require. This fact sheet outlines the appropriate sections of the legislation, the regulations and the Scottish Government guidance which relates to cross-border issues and provides links to these under the relevant section for ease of access.

Book Full text available online for free

Making reasonable adjustments at work for people with mental health problems

Author:
SCOTTISH ASSOCIATION FOR MENTAL HEALTH
Publisher:
Scottish Association for Mental Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
Glasgow

This guide is designed to provide straightforward information for employers on making reasonable adjustments in the workplace for people with mental health problems. It was produced in consultation with employers and with people who have experience of mental health problems while in employment. It looks at how to go about making adjustments, why employers would want to do so and where they can get help and support.

Book Full text available online for free

Working with the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act in care homes: information and guidance for people working in adult care settings

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
24p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This guidance has been developed to support managers and staff working in registered services for people with mental illness (including dementia), learning disability and other mental disorders in Scotland. It is for anyone employed in caring for an individual who, because that person is not capable of making key decisions about his or her own health and welfare, has become subject to the Adults with Incapacity (Scotland) Act 2000. The Mental Welfare Commission (MWC) has legal duties in relation to safeguarding the rights of people who are subject to the welfare provisions of the Act. The guidance focuses on issues relating to welfare guardianship and welfare powers of attorney in care homes and other registered care settings.

Book Full text available online for free

Young offenders and trauma: experience and impact. A practitioners guide.

Authors:
WRIGHT Sam, LIDDLE Mark, GOODFELLOW Pippa
Publisher:
Beyond Youth Custody
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
8
Place of publication:
London

This practitioner briefing aims to highlight what is currently known about the links between trauma and young people’s behaviour and development. Traumatic experiences very common in the backgrounds of young offenders and but the impact of these experiences can limit their ability to engage with opportunities and can seriously narrow their life chances. It is therefore critical that resettlement practitioners are aware of issues concerning trauma because attempting to address behaviour without understanding a young person’s underlying difficulties can result in unsuccessful and sometimes counterproductive interventions. The briefing considers the type of events that can cause trauma, the impact trauma can have, presents data to show the greater prevalence of mental health conditions and related issues such as substance dependency offenders; and looks at what this means for resettlement practice with young offenders. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

No harm done: recognising and responding to self-harm. Next steps for staff working with young people

Authors:
YOUNGMINDS, ROYAL COLLEGE OF PSYCHIATRISTS, CHARLIE WALLER MEMORIAL TRUST
Publisher:
YoungMinds
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
10
Place of publication:
London

Provides simple guidance to help professionals support young people who are self-harming. Self-harm describes any way in which a young person might harm themselves or put themselves at risk in order to cope with difficult thoughts, feelings or experiences. It affects up to 1 in 5 young people and spans the divides of gender, class, age and ethnicity. The document examines: how to recognise the self-harm warning signs; how to hold the first conversation; what to do when a young person is not ready to talk; what to do when there are concerns about a young person's immediate safety; how to provide practical support; and how to provide support within the context of a whole school approach. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

No health without mental health: a guide for general practice

Author:
MENTAL HEALTH STRATEGIC PARTNERSHIP
Publisher:
Mental Health Strategic Partnership
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

Following the publication of the Government’s new mental health strategy, this briefing sets out what general practices can do to improve the mental health of everyone in their communities and enhance the support and care offered to people with mental health conditions. The briefing outlines the six key objectives for better mental health and improved mental health care published in the Government's 'Call to Action'. It then set out what general practice can do, including: identifying problems early, keeping people at work, linking physical and mental health, getting advice from those who know and supporting carers.

Book Full text available online for free

Supervised community treatment: a guide for practitioners

Author:
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR MENTAL HEALTH IN ENGLAND
Publisher:
National Institute for Mental Health in England
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
91p.
Place of publication:
London

Introduced by the Mental Health Act 2007, Supervised Community Treatment (SCT) is implemented through the making of a Community Treatment Order and increases the range of options for mental health treatment in the community. This guide is intended for all those involved with patients who are being considered for, or are on, SCT, including mental health professionals working directly with patients. It describes the stages involved in deciding whether SCT is suitable and appropriate for the patient, covering patient eligibility and suitability, what conditions should be attached and the agreement to be reached before a Community Treatment Order is made, the care plan that should be available for the patient in the community and setting up treatment, managing in the community and how the patient will be monitored and supported, processes for recalling the patient and revoking the order, procedures to be followed to end SCT, and children and adolescents. This guide is not intended as a substitute for consulting the Act and Regulations, Code of Practice and Reference Guide, but as a quick reminder of all the issues.

Book

Mental health and employment: a mind to work: a good practice guide

Author:
CUMING Heidi
Publisher:
City and Hackney Mind
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
21p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

There is growing support for the idea that work can play an important part in the recovery process for people with mental health problems.  Work has a number of positive benefits including financial independence, a sense of purpose and belonging, increased self-esteem, social identity and status, and opportunities for growth and development.  This booklet is aimed at Employment Advisors, and aims to stimulate thinking around the issues involved in supporting someone with a mental health problem to secure and retain employment.  The focus of this booklet is paid employment, although some sections will also be of relevance to voluntary work, education and training.  It covers barriers to employment for adults with mental health problems, models of employment support such as sheltered work and User Employment Programmes, and how to make an assessment and develop an Action Plan for the client.  The booklet then looks at the Disability Discrimination Act (1995), reasonable adjustments employers are obliged to make for disabled persons, disclosure of mental health status to employers, and Disability Equality Duty (2006).  Finally, it looks at presenting employers with a business case to encourage them to employ someone with mental health problems, and how to support a client once they are in work.

Book Full text available online for free

Young people with mental health problems: a toolkit for school nurses, primary care and community professionals

Editors:
FREER Maryanne, (ed.)
Publisher:
Charlie Waller Memorial Trust
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
50p.
Place of publication:
Thatcham

The sections of this toolkit explain who it is for, give the facts on young people and mental health, and discuss getting help, the help given, day-to-day life problems, a complicated life situation, referral, and self-evaluation. There is a toolkit training pack, and appendices on researchers' findings and a day in the life of a school nurse.

Book Full text available online for free

Social circumstances reports: good practice guidance on the preparation of social circumstances reports for mental health officers and managers

Author:
MENTAL WELFARE COMMISSION FOR SCOTLAND
Publisher:
Mental Welfare Commission for Scotland
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
13p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

The Mental Health (Care and Treatment) (Scotland) Act 2003 introduced significant changes relating to the statutory provision of Social Circumstances Reports (SCRs). The Mental Welfare Commission welcomed these changes, which have resulted in an increase of over 50% in the provision of SCRs compared to the number provided under the 1984 Act. The Mental Welfare Commission is concerned about the lack of a strategic approach among most local authorities to assist Mental Health Officers (MHOs) in determining when an SCR should be provided. MHOs need a framework to assist them when using their discretion about whether or not an SCR is produced. The Mental Welfare Commission has identified this area of practice as one where practitioners and managers continue to have difficulty in achieving consistency in the circumstances in which service users, Responsible Medical Officers (RMOs) and the Mental Welfare Commission could expect a report to be prepared. The Mental Welfare Commission has therefore consulted relevant stakeholders and produced guidance on best practice that aims to be of use to practitioners and managers when considering the preparation of a Social Circumstances Report. This guidance may also be of interest to service users, carers, RMOs and advocates.

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