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Journal article

Advancing social work curriculum in psychopharmacology and medication management

Authors:
FARMER Rosemary L., BENTLEY Kia J., WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Work Education, 42(2), 2006, pp.211-230.
Publisher:
Council on Social Work Education

In this American article, the authors reviewed current literature and curriculum resources on psychopharmacology and social work. They argue that baccalaureate and master of social work courses need to routinely include more in-depth knowledge on psychopharmacology and provide a more critical social work-focused approach to this content due to the increasing complexity of social work practice, including a knowledge explosion in the neurosciences. Toward this end, seven curriculum modules are proposed, including suggestions for class activities and assignments and application of module content to field courses.

Journal article

Social workers' views of the etiology of mental disorders: results of a national study

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 50(1), January 2005, pp.43-52.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Research on many mental disorders since the 1990s strongly suggests a biological component to etiology. These developments should inform the decisions clinical social workers make regarding interventions with clients. Several recent research reports have suggested that social workers may underestimate the influence of biological factors in some mental disorders. Presents the results of a US national study of social workers in which disorder-specific measures of mental illness were used to determine more clearly whether social workers are making research-based assessments of mental illness etiology. It was found that social workers attribute causality of 4 disorders in a manner consistent with current research.

Journal article

A social work perspective on the adjustment disorders

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, CORCORAN Jacqueline
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 9(1-6), 2011, pp.107-121.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

The adjustment disorders represent a client's problematic reaction to an environmental stress rather than assuming an internal functioning deficit. As a sole diagnosis, they account for 5-21% of voluntary mental health client consultations. However, they are controversial because of their relative lack of diagnostic validity and reliability. They may also be overused by social workers to avoid stigmatising clients. The purpose of this article is to explore the suitability of the adjustment disorders as clinical diagnoses, and to provide, through 2 case illustrations, intervention guidelines for social workers. Both illustrations provide example of assessment questions, risk and resilience considerations, and procedures for goal setting and treatment planning. The article argues that these diagnoses represent consistency with social work professional values in their focus on the interaction between persons and their environments, and in calling specific attentions to stressors that can be addressed during the intervention process. Social workers should therefore be encouraged to use these diagnoses when appropriate.

Journal article

Engaging the family of the schizophrenic client

Author:
WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Social Casework, 70(2), February 1989, pp.106-113.
Publisher:
Alliance for Children and Families

Describes the preliminary task of persuading the family to become involved in treatment.

Book

Clinical assessment and diagnosis in social work practice

Authors:
CORCORAN Jacqueline, WALSH Joseph
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
518p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Oxford

This user-friendly textbook not only guides social workers in developing competence in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) system of diagnosis, it also assists them in staying attuned during client assessment to social work values and principles: a focus on client strengths, concern for the worth and dignity of individuals, appreciation of environmental influences on behaviour, and a reliance on evidence-based approaches. The authors, seasoned practitioner-scholars, provide an in-depth exploration of fourteen major mental disorders that social workers commonly see in practice, integrating several perspectives in order to meet the challenges social workers face in client assessment. A risk and resilience framework helps social workers understand environmental influences on the emergence of mental disorders and the strengths that clients already possess. Social workers will also learn to apply critical thinking to the DSM when it is inconsistent with social work values and principles. Finally, the authors catalogue evidence-based assessment instruments and treatments so that social workers can intervene efficiently and effectively, using the best resources available. Students and practitioners alike will appreciate the wealth of case examples, evidence-based assessment instruments, and treatment plans that make this an essential guide to the assessment and diagnostic processes in social work practice.

Journal article

Shyness and social phobia: a social work perspective on a problem in living

Author:
WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Work, 27(2), May 2002, pp.137-144.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The author argues that social phobia can be conceptualized from a social work perspective as an extreme shyness that can be overcome with cognitive learning and behavioural therapy. Reviews the biopsychosocial causes of social phobia and presents a summary of cognitive and behavioural interventions withe empirically demonstrated effectiveness.

Journal article

The role of the facilitator in support group development

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, HEWITT Heather E., LONDEREE Adrienne
Journal article citation:
Social Work with Groups, 19(3/4), 1997, pp.83-91.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Support groups for family members of persons with mental illness have become common in the past fifteen years. Much has been written about appropriate formats and content for such groups, and research indicates that persons who participate in them frequently receive important benefits. However, less has been written about the process of effectively recruiting members for groups. Family members, for various reasons, are often reluctant to take the step of joining a support group. In this article, the authors report their experience in organising a support group for siblings and adult children of persons with mental illness.

Journal article

Social support resource outcomes for the clients of two assertive community treatment teams

Author:
WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Research on Social Work Practice, 4(4), October 1994, pp.448-463.
Publisher:
Sage

Persons with serious mental illness require natural as well as professional supports to maintain successful community integration. Assertive community treatment programs have become preferred treatment modalities in the USA for working with such clients, but their potential for developing natural social support resources has not been examined adequately. In this project, two types of community treatment teams were studied, one featuring the extensive use of group treatment modalities and the other using individual client/case manager interventions, with regard to social support outcomes for clients.

Journal article

Social workers as family educators about schizophrenia

Author:
WALSH Joseph
Journal article citation:
Social Work: A journal of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW), 33(2), March 1988, pp.138-141.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

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Journal article

Ethical dilemmas of practicing social workers around psychiatric medication: results of a national study

Authors:
WALSH Joseph, et al
Journal article citation:
Social Work in Mental Health, 1(4), 2003, pp.91-105.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

It is acknowledged that social workers in mental health and other settings routinely experience client-related ethical dilemmas. Describes the results of a national survey of practicing social workers in the USA regarding the nature of ethical dilemmas they face related to their work with clients on medication issues. The results make it clear that social workers regularly confront a variety of ethical dilemmas in this type of practice. Many of these dilemmas are related to ambiguities around the knowledge base of practice, appropriate roles of providers, and basic personal and professional values. Presents implications of these findings for social work practice and further research. (Copies of this article are available from: Haworth Document Delivery Centre, Haworth Press Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, NY 13904-1580).

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