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Book Full text available online for free

100 ways to support recovery: a guide for mental health professionals

Author:
SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Rethink
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
30p.
Place of publication:
London

This is a guide for mental health staff aiming to support the development of a focus on recovery within services and providing ideas for working with users in a recovery-oriented fashion.

Journal article

Putting recovery into mental health practice

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2008, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

While the concept of recovery requires further development, the author argues that it provides a framework that could bring a radical transformation of mental health services in the UK. This article, based on a longer policy paper produced by the Sainsbury Centre, presents some of the key ideas and their implications for the delivery of mental health services.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Patient-rated mental health needs and quality of life improvement

Authors:
SLADE Mike, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 187(3), September 2005, pp.256-261.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Patient-rated unmet need is cross-sectionally associated with quality of life. This study aims to test the hypotheses that: (a) higher patient-rated unmet need is associated with lower individual quality of life assessments by a patient over time; and (b) reduction in patient-rated unmet need precedes improvement in quality of life. One hundred and one individuals using adult mental health services in Croydon, London were asked to complete 6-monthly questionnaires, comprising quality of life (Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, MANSA) and unmet need (Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule, CANSAS) assessments. Seventy-three participants provided 240 separate pairs of consecutive assessments. Random effects regression models indicated an impact on current quality of life for both average level of unmet need and change in unmet need over the past month. The authors conclude that changes in patient-rated unmet needs may cause changes in quality of life.

Journal article

Needs assessment: involvement of staff and users will help to meet needs

Author:
SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 165, September 1994, pp.293-296.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Argues that there are no assessment instruments which fully meet the requirements of the NHS and Community Care Act 1990, and those that do exist can be categorised as measuring: lack of health; lack of access to service or institutions; and lack of action by lay or professional mental health workers. These schedules are reviewed, and recommendations are made for the development of more appropriate tools, which are both practical to use and meet statutory requirements.

Book Full text available online for free

Making recovery a reality

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Helping people to recover their lives should be the top priority for mental health services. This means giving service users the chance to determine what future they want for themselves and offering practical support to help them to achieve it. While recovery is already government policy, the reality is that mental health services still focus more on managing people's symptoms than their work, education and family life. Yet these are what matter most to most people. The authors say "Recovery is a truly radical idea. It turns mental health services' priorities on their heads. Traditional services wait until a person's illness is cured before helping them to get their life back. Recovery-focused services aim from day one to help people to build a life for themselves. The medical care they give is in support of that bigger purpose." Making Recovery a Reality says mental health services need to change radically to focus on recovery. They need to demonstrate success in helping service users to get their lives back and giving service users the chance to make their own decisions about how they live their lives.

Journal article

Development of the REFOCUS intervention to increase mental health team support for personal recovery

Authors:
SLADE Mike, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 207(6), 2015, pp.544-550.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Background: There is an emerging evidence base about best practice in supporting recovery. This is usually framed in relation to general principles, and specific pro-recovery interventions are lacking. Aims: To develop a theoretically based and empirically defensible new pro-recovery manualised intervention, called the REFOCUS intervention. Method: Seven systematic and two narrative reviews were undertaken. Identified evidence gaps were addressed in three qualitative studies. The findings were synthesised to produce the REFOCUS intervention, manual and model. Results: The REFOCUS intervention comprises two components: recovery-promoting relationships and working practices. Approaches to supporting relationships comprise coaching skills training for staff, developing a shared team understanding of recovery, exploring staff values, a Partnership Project with people who use the service and raising patient expectations. Working practices comprise the following: understanding values and treatment preferences; assessing strengths; and supporting goal-striving. The REFOCUS model describes the causal pathway from the REFOCUS intervention to improved recovery. Conclusions: The REFOCUS intervention is an empirically supported pro-recovery intervention for use in mental health services. It will be evaluated in a multisite cluster randomised controlled trial (Publisher abstract)

Book

Personal recovery and mental illness: a guide for mental health professionals

Author:
SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
288p.
Place of publication:
Cambridge

The central thesis of this book is that the main aim of mental health services should be to promote personal recovery. The book argues that this will require fundamental change in the values and working practices of mental health professionals, from a focus on treating illness in order to produce clinical recovery to a new focus on supporting personal recovery by promoting well-being. It is intended primarily for mental health professionals, and aims to convince that a focus on personal recovery is the right direction for mental health services, to crystallise what personal recovery means, and to promote practice focusing on personal recovery. It proposes a new conceptual basis for mental health services prioritising the person over the illness (the Personal Recovery Framework), and identifies the contribution of personal and social identity to recovery. It also discusses what recovery focused services look like and includes 26 case studies from around the world.

Journal article

Recovery in psychiatry

Authors:
SCHRANK Beate, SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 31(9), September 2007, pp.321-325.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

In recent years, the concept of recovery from severe mental illness has increasingly gained relevance in the mental health field. Countries all over the world have been introducing recovery policy into mental health services However, there is still debate about the concept, such as whether symptom reduction is central or not. This article proposes a conceptual framework for recovery and identifies emergent practical issues. The term, two meanings, two classes of definitions which emerged from two different influences, can be identified for the term recovery in mental health. In psychiatry the idea of recovery is based on longitudinal studies demonstrating a widely heterogeneous course for severe mental illnesses. In this context, remission is defined as an improvement in symptoms and other deficits to a degree that they would be considered within a normal range. Recovery can be seen as a long-term goal of remission This is named service-based definition of recovery. A second definition of the term recovery came from the self-help and consumer/user/survivor movement. Here, recovery may include, but does not require, symptom remission or a return to normal functioning. However, recovery is seen as a process of personal growth and development, and involves overcoming the effects of being a mental health patient, with all its implications, to regain control and establish a personally fulfilling, meaningful life This is named the user-based definition of recovery. This is exemplified by the National Institute for Mental Health in England definition of recovery as the ‘achievement of a personally acceptable quality of life’.

Book

Choosing methods in mental health research: mental health research from theory to practice

Editors:
SLADE Mike, PRIEBE Stefan, (eds.)
Publisher:
Routledge
Publication year:
2006
Pagination:
298p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This book is concerned with how to choose the most appropriate mental health research method, not only to address a specific question, but to maximize the potential impact on shaping mental health care. The editors focus attention on the types of audience that the researcher is seeking to influence, the types of evidence each audience accepts as valid, and the relative strengths and limitations of each type of methodology. A range of research methodologies are described and critically appraised, and the use of evidence by different groups is discussed. This produces some important findings about the interplay between research production and consumption, and highlights directions for future mental health research theory and practice. The findings presented here will be relevant to mental health service users and professionals who use research evidence to inform decision-making.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Use of standardised outcome measures in adult mental health services: randomised controlled trial

Authors:
SLADE Mike, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 189(4), October 2006, pp.330-336.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

A randomised controlled trial, involving 160 representative adult mental health patients and paired staff (ISRCTN16971059). The intervention group (n=101) (a) completed monthly postal questionnaires assessing needs, quality of life, mental health problem severity and therapeutic alliance, and (b) received 3-monthly feedback. The control group (n=59) received treatment as usual. The intervention did not improve primary outcomes of patient-rated unmet need and of quality of life. Other subjective secondary outcome measures were also not improved. The intervention reduced psychiatric inpatient days (3.5 v.16.4 mean days, bootstrapped 95% CI1.6–25.7), and hence service use costs were £2586 (95% CI 102–5391) less for intervention-group patients. Net benefit analysis indicated that the intervention was cost-effective. Routine use of outcome measures as implemented in this study did not improve subjective outcomes, but was associated with reduced psychiatric inpatient admissions.

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