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Book Full text available online for free

Measuring what matters: key indicators for the development of evidence-based employment services

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, et al
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
16p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This paper puts forward a set of key performance indicators (KPIs) to assist local mental health and employment services to monitor employment outcomes and target development priorities for people in contact with specialist mental health services. Coverage includes: why employment matters, the policy background, the evidence on what works, commissioning guidance, developing the indicators, participation in the pilot, collecting data and what the returns revealed, ending with conclusions, recommendations and the final KPI framework.

Journal article

Putting recovery into mental health practice

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2008, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

While the concept of recovery requires further development, the author argues that it provides a framework that could bring a radical transformation of mental health services in the UK. This article, based on a longer policy paper produced by the Sainsbury Centre, presents some of the key ideas and their implications for the delivery of mental health services.

Journal article

Work - whose business is it anyway?

Author:
SHEPHERD Geoff
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 12(2), June 2007, pp.15-17.
Publisher:
Emerald

Finding employment is often a key element in recovery from mental ill health but few professionals place work at the top of their list of priorities during their efforts to support clients through rehabilitation. The author argues that mental health services need to recognise the importance of employment and accept that it is their business.

Book

Institutional care and rehabilitation

Author:
SHEPHERD Geoff
Publisher:
Longman
Publication year:
1984
Pagination:
181p.
Place of publication:
London
Book Full text available online for free

Making recovery a reality

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, SLADE Mike
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
16p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Helping people to recover their lives should be the top priority for mental health services. This means giving service users the chance to determine what future they want for themselves and offering practical support to help them to achieve it. While recovery is already government policy, the reality is that mental health services still focus more on managing people's symptoms than their work, education and family life. Yet these are what matter most to most people. The authors say "Recovery is a truly radical idea. It turns mental health services' priorities on their heads. Traditional services wait until a person's illness is cured before helping them to get their life back. Recovery-focused services aim from day one to help people to build a life for themselves. The medical care they give is in support of that bigger purpose." Making Recovery a Reality says mental health services need to change radically to focus on recovery. They need to demonstrate success in helping service users to get their lives back and giving service users the chance to make their own decisions about how they live their lives.

Journal article

Measuring the costs and benefits of promoting social inclusion

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, PERSONAGE Michael
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 15(4), 2011, pp.165-174.
Publisher:
Emerald

The concept of social inclusion appears to have dropped out of the policy vocabulary. This review argues that social inclusion remains a useful concept in understanding the causes of mental health problems and how these might best be addressed. It discusses the problems of measuring social inclusion and the principles of cost-effective evaluations in the context of health services which are struggling to cope with reduced funding. It then reviews the evidence and cost-effectiveness of attempts to improve the long-term health and social outcomes through early intervention in 3 key high-risk groups: children and young people with behavioural problems; young adults experiencing a first episode of psychosis; and unemployed adults of working age with mental health problems. The findings show strong evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of interventions aimed at improving social inclusion for these 3 high-risk groups, and provide support for prioritising these interventions, especially in times of severe financial restrictions.

Book

Inside residential care: the realities of hospital versus community settings

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, et al
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
1995
Pagination:
72p.,tables,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Report on a study of 25 residential settings for people with mental health problems. Describes the physical and social attributes of the settings studies, the characteristics of the residents and key features of the organisation and delivery of care. Looks in particular at the amount and quality of interaction between staff and residents and explores levels of reported satisfaction among both residents and staff.

Journal article

The 'Ward-in-a-House': residential care for the severely disabled

Author:
SHEPHERD Geoff
Journal article citation:
Community Mental Health Journal, 31(1), February 1995, pp.53-69.
Publisher:
Springer

Considers the 'new-long-stay' psychiatric patients - also often described as 'difficult-to-place' or as exhibiting 'challenging behaviour', and their need of a new kind of institution - one which has some of the characteristics of hospital and some of the characteristics of conventional, community housing. Services for people with long-term mental illness in the Cambridge Health District are discussed, and the use of the 'Ward-in-a-House' model, and outcomes from the use of this model.

Book Full text available online for free

Implementing recovery: a methodology for organisational change

Authors:
SHEPHERD Geoff, BOARDMAN Jed, BURNS Michael
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
19p.
Place of publication:
London

Recovery, the pursuit of quality of life by people with mental health problems, is core to mental health services in Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, USA, as well as England (‘New Horizons’, 2009). Following two Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health’s papers about recovery in 2008 and 2009, this methodology for the organisational changes, needed and reported in 2009 (following workshops with over 300 professionals, from 5 mental health trusts and independent organisations), can be used by statutory/non-statutory mental health providers and health/social care commissioners to deliver a ‘person-centred’ service. The principles mirror those in the 2009 National Mental Health Development Unit commissioning guidance. With, sections entitled ‘developing and how to use the methodology’, ‘views of commissioners’, ‘assessing services at the outset’, ‘agreeing priorities for action’, ‘tracking progress’, ‘future developments’, with reference to SMART goals (specific, measureable, agreed-upon, realistic, time-based) and boxed areas highlighting 10 changes/challenges and defining  3 engagement, development, and transformation stages of organisational change, the text is followed by 10 frameworks for organisational change and 2 templates for identifying priorities. In addition, the authors relate health system reforms, such as the 2010 standard National Mental Health contract and the National Social Inclusion programme (2009) suggesting they might add leverage to driving providers towards recovery-oriented delivery.

Journal article

In sickness and in health: the experiences of friends and relatives caring for people with manic depression

Authors:
HILL Robert G., SHEPHERD Geoff, HARDY Pollyanna
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 7(6), December 1998, pp.611-620.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Reports on the results of a survey of friends and relatives of members of the Manic Depression Fellowship, the largest mental self-help group in the UK. Results from over 1000 carers are reported regarding the perceived usefulness of professionals, their quality of life and perceived needs in terms of service provision. It is suggested that similar educational packages to those developed for relatives of people with schizophrenia may be useful.

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