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Journal article

Enabling the entrepreneur

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 11(2), May 2007, pp.6-10.
Publisher:
Emerald

The author talks to the Laughing Buddha Bubble Incubator project and Inspire, two projects which aim to work with people with mental health problems to help them develop their entrepreneurial skills.

Book Full text available online for free

Benefits and work for people with mental health problems: a briefing for mental health workers

Authors:
SEEBOHM Patience, SCOTT Judy
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Mental health service users often want to return to work, but after six months of sickness absence, only half ever succeed. Many are unsure or misinformed about how to make the journey into employment without feeling financially or emotionally insecure. It is important for mental health support workers in every field to have some knowledge of the benefits system – this briefing enables them to offer accurate guidance which will help service users make the move into employment with reduced risk to their wellbeing or their income. The briefing identifies seven major disincentives to work which must be tackled by policy makers before returning to employment can become a clear, easy process for service users. Under the present system, people may experience no financial gain, or even a drop in income from working, they may be unable to get financial support for practical needs at work, and they may be forced to undergo an untimely medical review.

Book

New thinking about mental health and employment

Authors:
GROVE Bob, SECKER Jenny, SEEBOHM Patience, (eds)
Publisher:
Radcliffe
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
162p.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Until recently it has been assumed that people who experience severe and enduring mental health problems are unable to work, unless or until they recover. That assumption is now being challenged by international research demonstrating that, with the right support, people can succeed in finding and keeping a job even when they continue to need support from mental health services. This book draws together the research undertaken to date and combines it with mental health service users’ perspectives on the workplace to validate key points.

Journal article

Care programme to work

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 3(4), November 1999, pp.19-21.
Publisher:
Emerald

Describes Care Programme to Work (CPTW) an action research project that aims to help local services develop employment opportunities for people who are on the higher tiers of Care Programme Approach. It brings together providers, their users and local employers, to develop ways in which users can more easily identify and pursue their vocational ambitions.

Journal article

Unlocking our potential

Authors:
SEEBOHM Patience, GRIFFITHS
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, April 2004, pp.24-26.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Looks at a new video which shows how young black men have overcome barriers to find a way forward out of mental illness. The video, 'Better must come', was produced by the Mellow Campaign and the Employment Support Programme based at the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health. Funding for the video project was provided by the Lord Mayor's Fund, the Department for Work and Pensions and the London Borough of Newham.

Journal article

Evening the odds: employment support, mental health and BME communities

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 12(4), November 2008, pp.19-22.
Publisher:
Emerald

The Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health has recently published a briefing paper on employment support for people from black and minority ethnic communities who have mental health problems. The author of the appear summarises some of the key issues.

Book Full text available online for free

Evening the odds: employment support, mental health and the black and minority ethnic communities

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
11p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This briefing states that all people with mental health problems face barriers in getting and keeping work but that these barriers can be even greater for people from Black and minority ethnic communities. It also suggests that mental health and employment services can help to overcome these barriers by offering targeted support for Black and minority ethnic people to achieve their hopes and fulfil their potential.

Journal article

What have we learnt about mental health and employment?

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob, SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review, 11(1), 2006, pp.8-15.
Publisher:
Pier Professional

This article examines the evidence regarding who can benefit from vocational interventions, service users' motivation to work, how people can be helped to find and keep a job and how unemployment can be prevented in the first place. The authors then look at practice evidence to show how effective services aimed at supporting service users to return or retain contact with the labour market can be developed.

Journal article

Net Working

Author:
SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Care, 4(2), October 2000, pp.68-69.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Describes a new national network which aims to support employment, education and training opportunities for people with mental health problems.

Journal article

Bold but balanced: how community development contributes to mental health and inclusion

Authors:
SEEBOHM Patience, GILCHRIST Alison, MORRIS David
Journal article citation:
Community Development Journal, 47(4), October 2012, pp.473-490.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Drawing on their own exploratory study of the role community development can play in the UK mental health context (Connect and Include, 2008), the authors of this article discuss how community development can contribute to mental well-being. The article focuses on how community development practitioners connect and include people experiencing mental health difficulties with community activities and mainstream services and increase opportunity and choice. It covers mental health and community context, recovery, inclusion, community-led initiatives, building trust, enabling and challenging, facilitating and light-touch support, and bridging barriers. It includes discussion of the findings from the Connect and Include study, which involved a survey and interviews with community development practitioners and participants in 8 sites across the UK. It identifies challenges for community development practitioners working with mental health service providers and users, and discusses the strengths and potential contribution of the community development approach in improving mental well-being.

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