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Journal article

Supporting mental health service users back to work

Author:
SECKER Jenny
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 8(3), September 2009, pp.38-45.
Publisher:
Emerald

Evidence accumulated over many years illustrates the benefits of work for mental health, including that of mental health service users. Despite strong evidence of the effectiveness of the individual placement and support (IPS) approach in enabling this group to find and keep paid employment, employment rates among mental health service users remain low, and IPS is not widely implemented in the UK. This paper reviews recent evidence for IPS, describes the key features of the approach and compares these with service users' accounts of the kind of support that they find helpful. The current situation regarding implementation of IPS is then considered, together with the barriers hindering implementation. It is clear that the barriers are multifaceted, and action will be required at a number of levels if mental health service users are to be enabled to achieve their employment goals.

Journal article

Art for mental health's sake

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, July 2007, pp.34-36.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

In 2005 the Development for Culture, Media and Sport and the Department of Health jointly commissioned a study to contribute to the evidence base on the benefits for mental health of participation of arts work. This article reports findings from two key strands of the second phase of the research: an outcomes study providing quantitative evidence of the benefits of arts participation for people with mental health needs, and a series of qualitative case studies of six arts and mental health projects that explored how people benefited from arts participation.

Book

New thinking about mental health and employment

Authors:
GROVE Bob, SECKER Jenny, SEEBOHM Patience, (eds)
Publisher:
Radcliffe
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
162p.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Until recently it has been assumed that people who experience severe and enduring mental health problems are unable to work, unless or until they recover. That assumption is now being challenged by international research demonstrating that, with the right support, people can succeed in finding and keeping a job even when they continue to need support from mental health services. This book draws together the research undertaken to date and combines it with mental health service users’ perspectives on the workplace to validate key points.

Journal article

Mental health and art

Author:
SECKER Jenny
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, May 2011, pp.21-22.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Drawing on the findings from research conducted at Anglia Ruskin University and the University of Central Lancashire 2007, the author discusses how art and artistic expression can help to improve mental health. As part of the study case studies were carried out with six diverse projects. Eight processes that were found to benefit participants in the six projects were identified. These were: getting motivated; focusing on art; connecting with others; rebuilding identities; expanding horizons; self-expression; connecting with abilities; and having time out.

Journal article

Mental health, social exclusion and social inclusion

Author:
SECKER Jenny
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review Journal, 14(4), December 2009, pp.4-11.
Publisher:
Emerald

Based on a comparison of ways of defining social exclusion within the mental health literature, this article outlines the social systems approach to understanding social exclusion (where social exclusion is seen as a concept encompassing processes that involve the failure of one or more of 4 systems on which the sense of belonging in society depends: the democratic and legal system, the labour market, the welfare state system, and the family and community system), and uses it to examine the position of people with mental health needs in the UK. It looks at the relationship between exclusion and inclusion and provides a critique of the inclusion imperative in mental health. From the evidence reviewed, the author concludes that there is a need for policy initiatives to focus on tackling the structural barriers that work to exclude people with mental health needs as well as on challenging deep-rooted prejudice and stigmatisation that reinforce those barriers, and a need to be mindful of the context in which inclusion policies are implemented, the assumptions implicit within these policies, and the possible consequences of their adoption.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Qualitative evaluation of a job retention pilot for people with mental health problems

Authors:
THOMAS Kristina, SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
British Journal of General Practice, 55(516), July 2005, pp.546-547.
Publisher:
Royal College of General Practitioners

Interviews with job retention clients, their employers and case managers were carried out. A group interview with GPs was also conducted. Client-focused interventions were reported to be helpful by clients and GPs and employer -focused interventions were appreciated by both clients and employers. All clients attributed positive outcomes to the service. In conclusion, these preliminary results support the further development and evaluation of job retention services.

Journal article

Mental health promotion theory: review and application

Author:
SECKER Jenny
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 4(1), March 2005, pp.10-12.
Publisher:
Emerald

Reviews the ways in which mental health has been defined in the mental health promotion literature and then introduces a model derived from mental health promotion theory. Concludes with an example of the model's application to promoting the well-being of mental health service users through the provision of evidence-based employment support.

Journal article

Working all together

Authors:
THOMAS Tina, SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2004, pp.30-33.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Job retention schemes have an essential role in a recovery orientated mental health service. This article looks at a job retention team (JRT) based in Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership Trust (AWMHTP). The JRT operates on a case management model, and offers a free service to people in employment currently experiencing mental health problems and at a risk of loosing their jobs as a result. The ultimate aim of the pilot is to develop a model for job retention services across the UK. Summarises findings from a qualitative evaluation of the project's first year of operation, from June 2002 to May 2003. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 of the 29 clients with whom the JRT had worked over the 12 months, 5 of their employers, 6 of their GPs and 2 case managers.

Journal article

What the papers say

Authors:
PHILO Greg, SECKER Jenny
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 24.2.94, 1994, p.15.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Research by the authors show that two-thirds of all media coverage associated mental illness with violent behaviour. Reports on the myths portrayed by the media.

Journal article

Development of a measure of social inclusion for arts and mental health project participants

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, et al
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 18(1), February 2009, pp.65-72.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

This paper aimed to develop a social inclusion measure for use in a study assessing the outcomes of arts participation for people with mental health needs. Methods used were concept and question development based on literature review, national and European surveys and results of a survey of arts and mental health projects. Measure piloted with 23 arts participants/service user researchers and field tested with 88 arts project participants returning questionnaires including the social inclusion measure, a measure of empowerment and the CORE mental health measure. Three scales were constructed measuring social acceptance, social isolation and social relations. Internal consistency was good for the individual scales and for the measure as a whole. Correlations with empowerment and CORE scores indicate reasonable predictive power for the population. Tests to date indicate the measure is acceptable and measures relevant concepts with good internal consistency. Test-retest reliability and construct validity are not established and replication is required to confirm internal consistency and establish a normative profile for the population.

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