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Journal article

Life saver or memory eraser?

Authors:
FLEISCHMANN Pete, ROSE Diana, WYKES Til
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 122, July 2003, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
MIND

Reports on a study carried out by the Service User Research Enterprise (SURE) to explore users' perspectives on electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). The review looked at 35 published research studies looking at user views and also collected 139 testomonies from users from internet sites, print media, video archives using advice from a reference group. Long term memory loss became one of the dominant themes of the review.

Journal article

Barriers and facilitators of disclosures of domestic violence by mental health service users: qualitative study

Authors:
ROSE Diana, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Psychiatry, 198(3), March 2011, pp.189-194.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Mental health service users experience higher rates of domestic violence then the general population but this often goes undetected. This study explored the facilitators and barriers to disclosure of domestic violence from both a service user and professional perspective. Eighteen community mental health service users (16 females, mean age 41 years) and 20 mental health professionals were recruited from a socioeconomically deprived south London borough. Thematic analysis was used to determine dominant and subthemes from individual semi-structured interviews. Service users described barriers to disclosure of domestic violence to professionals including: fear of the consequences (including Social Services involvement and child protection proceedings); fear of not being believed; fear of further violence; the hidden nature of the violence; actions of the perpetrator; and feelings of shame. The main themes for professionals concerned role boundaries, competency and confidence. Enquiry and disclosure were facilitated by a supportive and trusting relationship between the individual and professional. However, both groups suggested that the medical diagnostic and treatment model, with its emphasis on symptoms, could act as a barrier to enquiry and disclosure. The authors conclude that mental health services are not currently conducive to the disclosure of domestic violence. Professional training in how to address domestic violence is recommended in order to increase confidence and expertise.

Journal article

What are mental health service users' priorities for research in the UK?

Authors:
ROSE Diana, FLEISCHMAN Pete, WYKES Til
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 17(5), October 2008, pp.520-530.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

This study investigates service users' priorities for mental health research and compares them with established priorities. Groups of service users were convened from the London boroughs of Southwark, Lewisham, Lambeth and Croydon. The study was informed by participatory research methodology. User accounts of their research priorities were analysed using a modified grounded theory approach. Service users in this study identified different research priorities from those of professionals. They wished to design and conduct more research themselves, and were more interested in research that was social and psychological rather than biomedical. They also wished to see investigations of alternative treatments to psychiatric medication. The research priorities of service users need further investigation, and effective structures should be developed and consolidated to ensure that these priorities become incorporated into the mental health research agenda.

Book

In our experience: user-focused monitoring of mental health services in Kensington & Chelsea and Westminster Health Authority

Authors:
ROSE Diana, et al
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
35p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Report of a joint project run by the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health and Kensington and Chelsea and Westminster Health Authority which aimed to give people with severe mental health problems a voice in the services they receive.

Journal article

Partnership, co-ordination of care and the place of user involvement

Author:
ROSE Diana
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 12(1), February 2003, pp.59-70.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

The context for this paper is current UK policy emphasis on both `partnership' and `user involvement' and discussion on the system of Care Programme Approach (CPA). The aim was to investigate whether increasing co-ordination of care at a structural level is associated with greater user involvement. Social survey techniques were adapted in order to be user-focused and the work was prepared and carried out by service users. Service users tend to be unaware of the major way in which their care is co-ordinated but even less involved in it. On the rare occasions that service users are involved in their care and other elements of empowerment are in place, they are more satisfied overall with the services they receive. Increasing co-ordination of care at a managerial level does not necessarily lead to greater awareness or involvement amongst individual users of CPA. This may be linked to the way service users are perceived by their mental health workers and it is argued that this should change if users are to be full `partners'.

Journal article

Sure thing

Author:
ROSE Diana
Journal article citation:
Openmind, 116, July 2002, p.22.
Publisher:
MIND

Reports on the Service User Research Enterprise (SURE) at the Institute of Psychiatry in London. SURE has been set up to promote collaborative research between mental health service users and clinical academics.

Book

Users' voices: the perspectives of mental health service users on community and hospital care

Author:
ROSE Diana
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2001
Pagination:
120p.,bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

Report of a systematic study designed to find out what mental health service users think about living in the community, of their services and of the experiences of being in hospital. The questions were developed and asked by user interviewers. Aimed at mental health service planners and managers, policy makers, service users, practitioners and researchers.

Journal article

Lines of enquiry

Authors:
ROSE Diana, FORD Richard
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 11.2.99, 1999, p.27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

A study has shown that people with severe mental health problems are capable of being involved in planning their care. The authors suggest new ways of finding out what service users think.

Journal article

All in the mind

Author:
ROSE Diana
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 4.4.96, 1996, p.28.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Community care was fully implemented three years ago this week, but a report reveals that people with mental health problems living in the community still suffer abuse, prejudice and harassment.

Journal article

Collaborative research between users and professionals: peaks and pitfalls

Author:
ROSE Diana
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 27(10), November 2003, pp.404-406.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

Until recently, user-led research was not accepted by the academic mainstream. Nearly all of its publications are part of what is known as the 'grey' literature. It does not appear in peer-reviewed journals. However, there is now a sea-change in the status of user-led and collaborative research. Funding bodies such as National Health Service Executive Research and Development and Wellcome require evidence of user involvement in research proposals and sometimes require that users be involved centrally in the research itself. User-led research involves service users controlling all stages of the research process; design, recruitment, ethics, data collection, data analysis, writing up and dissemination.

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