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Book Full text available online for free

Recovery: a carer's perspective

Authors:
MACHIN Karen, REPPER Julie
Publishers:
Centre for Mental Health, NHS Confederation. Mental Health Network
Publication year:
2013
Pagination:
16
Place of publication:
London

This briefing paper examines what recovery means for the families and friends of people with mental health conditions. It suggests ways in which these informal carers can support recovery and looks at how mental health services can give the best possible help to do this. It also provides information about key resources, including the Triangle of Care and a Wellbeing Recovery Plan for families and friends. The briefing paper has been produced for the Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change Programme, a joint initiative from the Centre for Mental Health and the NHS Confederation’s Mental Health Network. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Travelling hopefully

Authors:
BASSET Thurstine, REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, November 2005, pp.16-18.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article discusses the role of hope for people with mental health problems and for people working in mental health services, and proposes a constructive cycle of hopefulness whereby hope leads to increasing opportunity.

Journal article

Young people supporting parents with mental health problems: experiences of assessment and support

Authors:
GRANT Gordon, REPPER Julie, NOLAN Mike
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 16(3), May 2008, pp.271-281.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

The explosion of interest in young people as carers over the last decade and a half conceals the fact that there are still no reliable estimates of the number of young people with caregiving responsibilities. This is even more problematic in circumstances where the ‘looked after’ person has a mental health problem. This study reflects on what can be done to identify, assess and support young people in these circumstances. The authors draw on selected findings from a study that has been examining the constituents of good assessment practice in work with family carers supporting relatives with mental health problems. The study embraces different carer groups but this paper concentrates on the experiences of young carers at one study site where Barnardo's and partner organisations had developed a joint initiative targeting young people who are looking after parents and relatives with mental health problems. Following a review of the literature about young people as carers, the paper describes how Barnardo's worked to support them through its young carers projects. Based on face-to-face interviews with the young people (N = 10) caring for a mother with mental health problems, the main part of the paper provides an account of how they talk about, make sense of and evaluate the support they have received through this combined initiative. The findings underscore the value of one particular young carers project, and provide clues about what lessons may be transferable to other similar projects.

Book

Serious mental health problems in the community: policy, practice and research

Editors:
BROOKER Charlie, REPPER Julie
Publisher:
Balliere Tindall
Publication year:
1998
Pagination:
336p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This resource offers a comprehensive, interdisciplinary critical overview of the effect of policy framework, organizational structures, economic issues and the principles of "good" practice in the provision of community services for people with serious mental health problems. Combines research evidence and practical illustrations of approaches and interventions with informed comment on their efficacy and implementation in routine clinical practice. Chapters include key points, case studies, questions for reflection and discussion and suggested further reading.

Journal article

Adjusting the focus of mental health nursing: incorporating service user's experiences of recovery

Author:
REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 9(6), December 2000, pp.575-587.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Mental health nursing is currently torn by debate about its proper focus and function, with the two dominant 'camps' competing for ascendancy. Although both traditions stress the need to involve service users in their own care, the hegemonic nature of these professional theories tends to relegate the expertise of those who experience mental health problems. This article considers service users' views and experiences, particularly their accounts of recovery, and finds a place for both approaches. Users also highlight the importance of strategies for social inclusion (facilitating access to roles, responsibilities, relationships and communities) an area of work that has not been prioritised by mental health nurses in either approach. Service users differ from each other and have a range of different roles in different settings. In developing their own strategies for living they need choices, multiple perspectives, a range of approaches and skills.

Journal article

Fear and loathing

Author:
REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 16.7.97, 1997, pp.42-44.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Fear of people with mental health problems clouds public perceptions. This article argues that nurses can help to nurture public goodwill.

Journal article

Serious mental health problems: policy change

Authors:
REPPER Julie, BROOKER Charlie, REPPER Dean
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 21.6.95, 1995, pp.29-31.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Describes current developments in policy and practice for people with serious mental health problems. Seeks to explain the basic principles of working with people in this client group.

Journal article

Valuable insights

Authors:
REPPER Julie, BROOKER Charles
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 23.6.93, 1993, pp.28-31.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Clarifies some of the problems schizophrenia presents for individuals and their families, and identifies the role of the nurse in the care, treatment and rehabilitation of people with a diagnosis of schizophrenia.

Journal article

Recovery versus risk? from managing risk to the co-production of safety and opportunity

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(2), 2016, pp.101-109.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a recovery-focused approach to risk and safety and what this might look like in practice. Design/methodology/approach: Review of recovery approaches and the ways in which traditional approaches to risk might hinder people in their recovery journey. Consideration of the principles of a recovery-focused approach to safety. Findings: A recovery-focused approach to risk based on co-produced safety plans that enable people to do the things they value as safely as possible and shared responsibility for safety. Four key principles of a recovery-focused approach to promoting safety, autonomy and opportunity are proposed. Originality/value: A recovery-focused approach to risk and safety is central to the development of recovery-focused practice within services. This paper outlines such an approach. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

“Walking wounded or wounded healer?” does personal experience of mental health problems help or hinder mental health practice? a review of the literature

Authors:
CONCHAR Catherine, REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 18(1), 2014, pp.35-44.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: A systematic review of the literature on “wounded healers” was undertaken to identify, define and interpret the term and its application within the mental health environment. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach:Eight key medical/social sciences databases were interrogated. In total, 835 papers were identified in the systematic database search and abstracts were obtained for each to determine whether they met the inclusion criteria. In total, 237 sources were retrieved for critical reading, to assess relevance and value to the review, and 125 documents were subsequently included. Through thematic analysis a number of themes and sub themes were identified. Findings: The archetypal image of the wounded healer originates in ancient mythology and crosses many cultures. There are many interpretations and applications of the belief that having healed their own wounds a person is in a better position to heal others, however, the evidence to support this is not so robust. Of more direct relevance to contemporary practice are reports of supporting staff with mental health problems to make a contribution to mental health services, most recently through the employment of peer support workers. Originality/value: As peer support workers are increasingly being employed in mental health services, it is helpful to consider the many existing staff who bring personal experience of mental health problems. This paper explores the evidence that their lived experience makes a difference to the way that they work and considers their employment support needs. (Publisher abstract)

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