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Journal article

Increasing the employment rate for people with longer-term mental health problems

Authors:
RINALDI Miles, MONTIBELLER Tatiana, PERKINS Rachel
Journal article citation:
Psychiatrist (The), 35(9), September 2011, pp.339-343.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

People with mental health problems, especially those accessing secondary services, often experience low rates of employment. However many continue to regard employment as a yardstick of recovery. The low priory given to employment by mental health professionals and low expectation of being able to gain employment by the patients themselves contribute to the problem. This study examined the effects of implementing the individual placement and support (IPS) approach within four community mental health teams (CMHTs) in London. A full-time employment specialist was working in each CMHT and independent assessment confirmed that high quality IPS was being delivered. Demographic, clinical and vocational data were collected through a repeated cross-sectional survey and a service user experience survey was carried out. The IPS approach appeared to have a significant effect on the employment rates for service users, including those with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. A higher proportion felt able to return to employment and a smaller proportion believed they were unable to work because of their mental health problems. Employment rates for service users appeared to be independent of general employment rates.

Journal article

What sort of support in employment?

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, et al
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 5(1), February 2001, pp.6-13.
Publisher:
Emerald

Despite a growing amount of literature concerning the success of supported employment initiatives in enabling people with mental health problems to work successfully in open employment less attention has been paid to the type of support people might require. This article explores this issue from the perspective of the Pathfinder User Employment project.

Journal article

Access to employment: a supported employment project to enable mental health service users to obtain jobs within mental health teams

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, BUCKFIELD Richard, CHOY Daisy
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 6(3), June 1997, pp.307-318.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Considers the importance of employment for people who experience serious mental health problems, together with the shortage of employment opportunities for them. A supported employment project is described. The problems encountered in this initiative, and the solutions sought, are outlined. The project has provided much needed employment opportunities for people who have experienced serious mental health problems. It has also recognised the special skills and expertise of users and made these available to other users and staff within the service. There also appears to have been a positive effect on staff attitudes and practices.

Journal article

Mad to work here...

Authors:
DAVIDSON Ben, PERKINS Rachel
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 8.10.97, 1997, pp.26-30.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Describes the Pathfinder User Employment Project which helps to give mental health service users the chance to transcend their patient status by employing them within the sector.

Journal article

Recovery versus risk? from managing risk to the co-production of safety and opportunity

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 20(2), 2016, pp.101-109.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a recovery-focused approach to risk and safety and what this might look like in practice. Design/methodology/approach: Review of recovery approaches and the ways in which traditional approaches to risk might hinder people in their recovery journey. Consideration of the principles of a recovery-focused approach to safety. Findings: A recovery-focused approach to risk based on co-produced safety plans that enable people to do the things they value as safely as possible and shared responsibility for safety. Four key principles of a recovery-focused approach to promoting safety, autonomy and opportunity are proposed. Originality/value: A recovery-focused approach to risk and safety is central to the development of recovery-focused practice within services. This paper outlines such an approach. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Real lives: promoting recovery through personalisation and peer support

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, et al
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Social Inclusion, 19(1), 2015, pp.22-29.
Publisher:
Emerald

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of Real Lives: a community interest company that provides peer support for people who face significant mental health challenges using personal budgets. Design/methodology/approach: The paper offers a descriptive summary of the vision behind Real Lives and the successful realisation of this vision in practice based on interviews by the first author with the directors, Operational Manager, Cafe Manager and “Peers and Allies for in Living” who provide support to clients. Findings: The successful development of Real Lives shows that it is possible to utilise peer support and personal budgets to a create small, values based, financially viable organisation outside the statutory sector that is part of its community and can provide outside the statutory sector. A service for people facing significant mental health challenges that is personalised, recovery-focused and puts the client in control and is focused on helping them to do the things they want to do and pursue their aspirations. Originality/value: Real Lives is an innovative recovery-focused service that is part of its community and offers a model for utilising Self-Directed Support and personal budgets and that might be replicated by others. (Publisher abstract)

Journal article

Harnessing the expertise of experience: increasing access to employment within mental health services for people who have themselves experienced mental health problems

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, RINALDI Miles, HARDISTY Joss
Journal article citation:
Diversity in Health and Care, 7(1), 2010, pp.13-21.
Publisher:
Radcliffe Publishing

The User Employment Programme at South West London and St George’s Mental Health NHS Trust was established in 1995 with the intention of increasing access to employment within mental health services for people who have themselves experienced mental health problems. The programme has two elements, a supported employment programme, and a Charter for the Employment of People who have Experienced Mental Health Problems which is designed to decrease employment discrimination. This article describes the employment outcomes that were achieved during the 12 year period between January 1995 and 2007. During that time 142 people with mental health problems were supported in 163 posts within the trust, 86% of whom continued to work or were engaged in professional training. At the time of appointment people with schizophrenia had been unemployed for significantly longer periods than subjects with other mental health problems. There was no significant association between length of time for which support was provided, job type, job grade or success in sustaining employment. In 2007, 23% of all recruits to the trust had experienced mental health problems. Recruits with mental health problems were more numerous among those recruited to higher-grade positions in the organisation. The authors comment that the findings strongly suggest that people who have experienced mental health problems can work effectively in ordinary positions within mental health services under the same terms and conditions as any other employees. They conclude that mental health services have an important role to play as exemplar employers of people with mental health problems.

Journal article

Unemployment rates among patients with long term mental health problems

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, RINALDI Miles
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 26(8), August 2002, pp.295-298.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

This article surveys the unemployment rates among people with mental health problems in the London Borough of Wandsworth, It argues that greater attention to vocational issues in clinical teams is required. The challenge of mental health services is to make employment interventions available to those who need them.

Journal article

Different but normal: language, labels and professional mental health practice

Authors:
PERKINS Rachel, REPPER Julie
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Care, 2(3), November 1998, pp.90-93.
Publisher:
Pavilion

The words we use to describe mental illness and people with mental health problems speak volumes about our attitudes to and beliefs about mental ill health. Argues that mental health nurses should be mindful of the hugely significant role language plays, socially and professionally, in perpetuating discrimination, and of its potential as a tool for social change.

Journal article

A tricky act to balance

Authors:
REPPER Julie, PERKINS Rachel
Journal article citation:
Nursing Times, 18.3.98, 1998, pp.36-37.
Publisher:
Nursing Times

Discusses the dilemma facing mental health nurses as on the one hand they are expected to provide services in accordance with the wishes of service users, and on the other faced with increasing demands that both the public and services users are protected.

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