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Journal article

Cash in their hands

Authors:
COLDHAM Tina, NEWBIGGING Karen, VICK Nicola
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2005, pp.26-28.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

This article reports on a project undertaken by the Health and Social Care Advisory Service (HASCAS), and funded by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, to explore the barriers to implementing direct payments in mental health and the ways in which take up of direct payments by people experiencing direct payments could be increased. The project used focus groups to facilitate dialogue between mental health professionals and service users about the potential offered by direct payments to give more choice and control to service users. The project also aimed to target people from black and minority communities. Summarises some of the main findings.

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The right to be heard: review of the quality of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services in England

Authors:
NEWBIGGING Karen, et al
Publisher:
University of Central Lancashire. School of Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
292
Place of publication:
Preston

Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services were introduced in the Mental Health Act 2007. Primary Care Trusts (PCTs) became responsible for ensuring the availability of IMHA services in April 2009. An IMHA is a specialist type of mental health advocate, granted specific roles and responsibilities under the 2007 Act. The role of the IMHA is to help qualifying patients understand the legal provisions to which they are subject under the Mental Health Act 1983, the rights and safeguards to which they are entitled, and to help these patients to exercise their rights through supporting participation in decision-making. This review of the quality of IMHA provision across England was commissioned by the Department of Health. The study was undertaken by researchers at the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan) in partnership with Equalities National Council, Aawaz, Manchester African Caribbean Mental Health Services and Comensus, a University-wide forum supporting the involvement of service users and carers in teaching and research. The main aim was to look at how IMHA services are providing help to patients under the 2007 Act, what makes for a good IMHA service, and what factors influence the quality of service provided. The study used different methods to gather information about how IMHA services are working in practice. A first stage involved: a focused literature review; 11 focus groups held across England with a range of stakeholders (advocates, mental health service users, IMHA partners, carers and mental health professionals); and shadow visits to IMHA services. A second stage involved gathering data in eight case study sites (mental health providers) to understand the experience of qualifying patients, the commissioning and delivery of IMHA services, and their relationship with mental health services. The case study sites were selected to reflect differences in the local population and the way IMHA services were organised and delivered. In total 214 people were interviewed, including 90 qualifying patients, 61 of whom had experience of using IMHA services. The report presents key findings on: experiences of the 2007 Act; access to, and understanding and provision of IMHA services; IMHA services and the diversity of qualifying patients; the mental health services context; the benefits of the service; commissioning IMHA services; and determining the quality of IMHA services. The report makes recommendations for government, the Care Quality Commission, commissioners, mental health services, IMHA services, service user, carer and community organisations, and higher education and training providers. This research has found that the IMHA role is valued and appreciated by service users, although its potential is not fully realised. Action is required to strengthen the capacity of such advocacy services; and future research needs to explore gaps in the evidence base and to further evaluate the impact of IMHA practice. (Edited publisher abstract)

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The right to be heard: review of the quality of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services in England: summary report

Authors:
NEWBIGGING Karen, et al
Publisher:
University of Central Lancashire. School of Health
Publication year:
2012
Pagination:
35
Place of publication:
Preston

An Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) is a statutory mental health advocate, granted specific roles and responsibilities under the Mental Health Act 2007. The Department of Health commissioned researchers at the University of Central Lancashire to undertake this study (UCLan) in partnership with Equalities National Council, Aawaz, Manchester African Caribbean Mental Health Services and Comensus, a University-wide forum supporting the involvement of service users and carers in teaching and research. The main aim was to look at how IMHA services are providing help to patients under the 2007 Act, what makes for a good IMHA service, and what factors influence the quality of service provided. The study used multiple methods to gather information about how IMHA services are working in practice. The study was undertaken in two stages, the first of which enabled the development of draft quality indicators for IMHA services. The second stage involved gathering data in eight case study sites (NHS Trust areas) to understand the experience of qualifying patients, and the commissioning and delivery of IMHA services and their relationship with mental health services. This report summarises the main findings on: experiences of the 2007 Act; access to, and understanding and provision of IMHA services; IMHA services and the diversity of qualifying patients; the mental health services context; the benefits of the service; commissioning IMHA services; and determining the quality of IMHA services. The findings confirm that there is a role for IMHA and that this role is valued by IMHA partners, but that most is not being made of this opportunity. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Making a real difference

Author:
NEWBIGGING Karen
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, September 2005, pp.27-30.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

The National Institute for Mental Health England (NIMHE) was established in 2002, and from the beginning had a commitment to put people who use services at the centre of their work, and involve service users and carers in the planning and delivery of work. In 2004 the NIMHE executive team conduced a review of service users and carer involvement at all levels within NIMHE, with the aim of identifying what action was needed to develop a more co-ordinated and strategic approach. This article provides a brief overview of the review, its key findings and recommendations.

Book Full text available online for free

Mtetezi: developing health advocacy with African and Caribbean men

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, NEWBIGGING Karen, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
174p.
Place of publication:
London

There is a substantial body of evidence pointing to a negative relationship between mental health services and African and Caribbean men, who are under-represented as users of enabling services and over-represented in the population of patients who are admitted to, compulsorily detained in, and treated by mental health services. The consequences of this are poor engagement with mainstream services, restricted choices and high levels of dissatisfaction with mainstream care. The review identified the potential of advocacy to address these issues and to secure access to the most appropriate forms of support.

Journal article

‘When you haven't got much of a voice’: an evaluation of the quality of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) services in England

Authors:
NEWBIGGING Karen, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 23(3), 2015, pp.313-324.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

Given the context of increasing numbers of people detained under the Mental Health Act and heightened awareness of the potential for neglect and abuse in human services, statutory advocacy is an important safeguard supporting human rights and democratising the social relationships of care. This article reports findings from a national review of Independent Mental Health Advocate (IMHA) provision in England. A qualitative study used a two-stage design to define quality and assess the experience and impact of IMHA provision in eight study sites. A sample of 289 participants - 75 focus group participants and 214 individuals interviewed - including 90 people eligible for IMHA services, as well as advocates, a range of hospital and community-based mental health professionals, and commissioners. The research team included people with experience of compulsion. Findings indicate that the experience of compulsion can be profoundly disempowering, confirming the need for IMHA. However, access was highly variable and more problematic for people with specific needs relating to ethnicity, age and disability. Uptake of IMHA services was influenced by available resources, attitude and understanding of mental health professionals, as well as the organisation of IMHA provision. Access could be improved through a system of opt-out as opposed to opt-in. Service user satisfaction was most frequently reported in terms of positive experiences of the process of advocacy rather than tangible impacts on care and treatment under the Mental Health Act. IMHA services have the potential to significantly shift the dynamic so that service users have more of a voice in their care and treatment. However, a shift is needed from a narrow conception of statutory advocacy as safeguarding rights to one emphasising self-determination and participation in decisions about care and treatment. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book

Direct payments and mental health: new directions

Authors:
NEWBIGGING Karen, LOWE Janice
Publisher:
Pavilion
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
93p.
Place of publication:
Brighton

A review of how take-up of direct payments by people experiencing mental health problems can be increased. Direct payments were introduced in 1997 as a means of increasing the choice and control people have over the care they receive. However, take-up by people experiencing mental health problems has been slow. This project aimed to engage with service users and professionals to raise awareness about direct payments and their potential and to identify positive action to address the barriers to take-up. It also describes the process used to engage with stakeholders, including a national conference and recruiting service users from black and minority ethnic communities to facilitate focus groups. Successful implementation of direct payments in mental health evidently relies on proactive managers who are clear about the task, knowledgeable and committed practitioners, and informed service users and carers who are interested in exploring the options of direct payments. The report identifies action for these thre groups as well as for national policy-making.

Journal article

Not so easy

Author:
NEWBIGGING Karen
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, October 2002, pp.12-13.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Looks at how primary care services are responding to standard two of the National Service Framework for Mental Health, that anyone who contacts their primary health care team with a common mental health problem should be assessed and offered treatment or referral to a specialist mental health service.

Journal article

Promoting social inclusion

Author:
NEWBIGGING Karen
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review, 6(3), September 2001, pp.5-12.
Publisher:
Pier Professional

The National Service Framework for Mental Health (Department of Health, 1999) highlights the need for health and social services to tackle stigma and discrimination and to promote the social inclusion of people with mental health problems, but there are doubts as to how effectively this will be translated into action. This article aims to provide a basis for practical action by starting with the experience of exclusion by people with mental health problems, exploring the meanings of social inclusion and exclusion, identifying some useful contributions to thinking about social inclusion and considering what these might mean in practice. Argues that if social inclusion is to be translated into reality for people with mental health problems then the ambiguities within practice and policy need to be recognised, the reasons for exclusion made explicit, and an acknowledgement that promoting inclusion is necessarily a demanding endeavour.

Book Full text available online for free

Commissioning and providing mental health advocacy for African and Caribbean men

Authors:
SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE, NEWBIGGING Karen, et al
Publisher:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Publication year:
2008
Place of publication:
London

The purpose of this resource guide is to provide pointers for commissioners and providers of advocacy services to ensure that African and Caribbean men have access to appropriate high-quality mental health advocacy. Appropriate advocacy services contribute to countering the effects of social exclusion and discrimination, which have been identified as significant issues for these men in their engagement with mental health services. The guide provides: key messages from the research evidence; policy principles to guide positive practice; translating these principles into practice; options for the organisation of advocacy; examples of advocacy services for African and Caribbean men; implications for mental health service users from other black and minority ethnic communities; and information about available resources. (Previously publised as SCIE Resource Guide no. 10).

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