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On the edge: ChildLine spotlight: suicide

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
35
Place of publication:
London

This report examines the profile of young people with suicidal thoughts who contacted ChildLine, and examines what they need when they are already distressed and contemplating taking their own lives. It outlines the key issues young people raised and how the stigma of suicide means that the adults in their lives (including professionals) are failing to spot the signs, finding it hard to listen to their distress, and are sometimes providing inadequate levels of support. Drawing on the expertise from other organisations and the lessons learnt through ChildLine, the report sets out a series of recommendations. These show how simple changes in the way young people are listened to and supported can make a huge difference, helping children to get support earlier, and breaking the silence and stigma that surrounds the issue of suicide. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Not alone anymore. Childline annual review 2016/17

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
NSPCC
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
73
Place of publication:
London

Annual review providing key statistics on the numbers of children and young people contacting Childline in 2016/17, the reasons for contacting the service, the numbers of children referred from Childline to external agencies and the reasons for referral. The review provides detailed information on children contacting Childline due to anxiety and suicidal thoughts or feelings - two areas that have shown substantial year-on-year increases in counselling sessions. It also looks at the experiences of children contacting Childline who were d/Deaf, disabled, had special educational needs or a health condition. The review reports there were 295,202 counselling sessions in 2016/17, of which 71 per cent took place online compared with 29 per cent on the telephone. Mental and emotional health, family relationships and bullying were the three most common reasons for children contacting Childline. Other main concerns include: suicidal feelings; sex, relationships and sexual health; friendship issues; self-harm; problems in school; sexual abuse and online sexual abuse; and physical abuse. Appendices provide statistical breakdowns by age, gender, and type of concern. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

It turned out someone did care: Childline annual review 2015/16

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
43
Place of publication:
London

This annual review looks at what children and young people talked about when they contacted the NSPCC Childline in 2015/16. It presents key statistics on the numbers of children contacting the services, looks at the reasons for contacting the service, the numbers of children referred from Childline to external agencies and the reasons for referral. It reports that Childline provided 301,413 counselling sessions to children and young people in 2015/16, a 5 per cent increase compared with 2014/15. The top three concerns of young people were low self-esteem and unhappiness, family relationships, and bullying. The review also provides more detailed information on the biggest and emerging issues over the year, which cover: mental health and wellbeing; sexuality and gender identity; and problems at school. It reports that the number of counselling sessions related to mental health and wellbeing continue to rise; there is also a rise in mental health and wellbeing counselling sessions resulting in referral to external agencies; counselling about sexuality and gender identity issues is at the highest levels experienced by Childline; and the number of counselling sessions about problems at school has increased by 12 per cent since 2014/15. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Transforming mental health services for children who have experienced abuse: a review of Local Transformation Plans

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
NSPCC
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
20
Place of publication:
London

Reports on an analysis of 117 Local Transformation Plans from Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to assess how they plan to support the mental health needs of children and young people who have experienced abuse. The review sought to assess to what extent they recognise that mental health issues can be attributed to abuse and neglect; whether the needs analysis incorporates abused and neglected children; and the information contained within each plan relating to existing or proposed new services for children who have experienced abuse or maltreatment. The results found that only 14 percent of plans considered the needs for support of all children who've experienced abuse or neglect and one third of plans made no mention of provision of services for this group of children. A small number of promising plans were identified and the report highlights examples of good practice. Key themes include: the recognition that abuse is a major risk factor for poor mental health; broad needs assessments; a commitment to addressing non-diagnosable mental health concerns following traumatic life events such as abuse; clear information about services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

"Always there when I need you": ChildLine review: what's affected children in April 2014 - March 2015

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2015
Pagination:
44
Place of publication:
London

This annual review looks at what children talk about when they contact the NSPCC ChildLine. It looks at who contacts the service and how and focuses on some of the biggest and emerging issues of the last year: mental health, sexual abuse and partner abuse. It also includes a breakdown of statistics by age, gender and for each UK nation. During 2014-15, ChildLine counselled 276,956 children and supported a further 9,856 who had serious concerns about another child. This brings our total counselling sessions to 286,812. The ChildLine website received over 3.2 million visits – 5 per cent more than in 2013-14. The top three concerns counselled were family relationships, low self-esteem/unhappiness and abuse. Four of the top ten issues related to mental health. These issues were self-harm, suicide, low self-esteem/unhappiness and mental health conditions. There was a 124 per cent increase in the number of counselling sessions where young people talked about problems accessing services. Online counselling continued to grow, rising from 68 per cent in 2013-14, to 71 per cent in 2014-15. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Parents with a mental health problem: learning from case reviews

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
NSPCC
Publication year:
2015
Place of publication:
London

This briefing highlights risk factors and key learning for improved practice from case reviews where the mental health problems of parents was a key factor. It is based on case reviews published from since 2013. The briefing identifies the following risk factors for practitioners to be aware of: disclosure of suicidal feelings; threats to kill; stress factors; domestic abuse; drug or alcohol misuse; and lack of engagement with services. Pointers to improve practice include: giving better consideration of the impact of mental health issues on parenting capacity; the need for children's services and adult services to work together and think of the whole family; listening to parents; having the confidence to question and challenge; and ensuring assessment is a shared task between children's social workers and adult mental health. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Under pressure: Childline review: what's affected children in April 2013 - March 2014

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
72
Place of publication:
London

A review of the NSPCC ChildLine's activities in 2013/14. The report analyses key data from children and young people’s contacts with ChildLine, focusing on: reasons why children and young people seek help from ChildLine; who contacts the service; referrals; mental health conditions; eating disorders; online abuse and safety; and school and education problems. During 2013/14, ChildLine counselled 280,064 children and supported a further 10,915 who had serious concerns about another child. Four of the top ten issues relate to mental health, accounting for more than two thirds of total concerns. These are self-harm; suicide; low self-esteem and unhappiness; and (diagnosable) mental health conditions. The three main worries were family relationships, low self-esteem and unhappiness and self-harm. For the first time, school and education problems appeared in the top ten concerns with a 200 per cent increase in counselling about exam stress. Since 2012/13 there has been a 15 per cent increase in counselling about eating disorders and a 21 per cent increase for body image issues. Referrals on behalf of the most vulnerable and at risk children saw a 7 per cent increase, with Key Stats 65 per cent of total referrals about suicidal young people. There has been an increase of 168 per cent from 2012/13 in counselling about online sexual abuse while there has been an 18 per cent decrease in physical abuse counselling. (Edited publisher abstract)

Digital Media Full text available online for free

Culture and faith: learning from case reviews

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2014
Pagination:
4
Place of publication:
London

This briefing is based on serious case reviews published from 2010 onwards where culture and faith were highlighted as significant issues. It examines a range of factors which can increase the level of risk where there are issues around culture, religion and faith, including social and cultural isolation, cultural conflicts within families, cultural and religious concerns overriding child protection issues, confusion over self-identity and interplay between religion and mental health. The briefing also identifies and discusses the learning contained in these reviews and highlights the need for practitioners and social services to ensure cultural and religious sensitivity but to challenge practices and behaviours that may harm vulnerable people. (Original abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Looking after infant mental health in Scotland: our case for change. A summary of research evidence

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
21
Place of publication:
London

Drawing on evidence from research and practice, this report sets out a case for prioritising the mental health needs of young children in care in Scotland who have experienced abuse or neglect. Statistics from Scotland are included throughout to support key points. The report presents evidence to show that children who experience maltreatment and grow up without positive and stable relationships are at greater risk of mental health problems and other poor outcomes throughout their lives. It looks at the lack of stable relationships for children in care due to unstable placements; the need for specialist support for foster carers; the need for services to support vulnerable birth parents to care for their children; and the need for more services to identify and look after the mental health of babies and infants. Finally the report presents evidence to show the benefits of investing early to provide the right support for children, their parents and carers, highlighting the savings and long term benefits to society as a whole. The report forms part of the NSPCC case for change, which, by highlighting the fundamental importance of looking after infant mental health, aims to build awareness and understanding, and to create change for the better. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Looking after infant mental health: our case for change. A summary of research evidence

Author:
NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN
Publisher:
National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
21
Place of publication:
London

Drawing on evidence from research and practice, this report sets out a case for prioritising the mental health needs of young children in care who have experienced abuse or neglect. The report focuses England and Wales, and includes data and statistics throughout to support key points. It presents evidence to show that children who experience maltreatment and grow up without positive and stable relationships are at greater risk of mental health problems and other poor outcomes throughout their lives. It looks at the lack of stable relationships for children in care due to unstable placements; the need for specialist support for foster carers; the need for services to support vulnerable birth parents to care for their children; and the need for more services to identify and look after the mental health of babies and infants. Finally the report presents evidence to show the benefits of investing early to provide the right support for children, their parents and carers, highlighting the savings and long term benefits to society as a whole. The report forms part of the NSPCC case for change, which, by highlighting the fundamental importance of looking after infant mental health, aims to build awareness and understanding, and to create change for the better. (Edited publisher abstract)

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