Filter results

Register/log in to your SCIE account to use the search filters below

Search results for ‘Subject term:"mental health problems"’ Sort:  

Results 1 - 10 of 11

Journal article

Does early intervention for psychosis services make economic sense?

Author:
McCRONE Paul
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2012, pp.31-33.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Early intervention services have existed in England for more than a decade. This article examines whether they deliver the cost savings and cost effectiveness to justify them. It suggests that current evidence points to early intervention services providing cost savings and cost effectiveness, but more research is needed to clarify the conclusions. It concludes that much of the cost saving can be made in terms of increased economic activity and reduced crime, as well as reducing costs in health care settings.

Journal article

Costing different models of mental health service provision

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, CHISHOLM Daniel, BOULD Martin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Research Review, 6, May 1999, pp.14-17.
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit

This article describes one recent attempt to model the costs of a range of mental health care strategies in an outer-London health authority. The perceived value of the modelling approach to service costing was to supply insights into and estimates of broad directions of change, which could subsequently inform a wider discussion between local clinicians, planners and managers about future mental health service in the locality.

Book

Community psychiatric nurses in an intensive community support team: comparisons with generic CPN care

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, BEECHAM Jeni, KNAPP Martin
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
13p.,tables.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Research paper looking at the reorganised community psychiatric nursing service in Greenwich, where individual staff act as case managers and client advocates, and compares it with the standard organisation of generic CPN services. This paper focuses on service utilisation and cost.

Journal article

Information systems and the take-up of benefits by mentally ill people

Author:
McCRONE Paul
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review, 4(2), June 1999, pp.21-23.
Publisher:
Pier Professional

Describes the use of a computerised welfare benefits assessment tool, Lisson Grove Benefits Program, to assist in identifying an individuals entitlement. Findings suggest that many people were not receiving their full entitlement.

Journal article

Quality of life and service utilisation of psychotic patients in south London: the PRISM study

Authors:
CLARKSON Paul, McCRONE Paul
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 7(1), February 1998, pp.71-80.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Quality of Life (QQL) measures are being used increasingly in the assessment of outcomes in community services for the mentally ill. This article presents evaluations made by an epidemiologically representative group of psychotic patients in South London concerning their quality of life while receiving a comprehensive range of community care services. Results indicate differences in patients' evaluations of quality of life according to specific services used.

Journal article

The development of a Local Index of Need (LIN) and its use to explain variations in social services expenditure on mental health care in England

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, et al
Journal article citation:
Health and Social Care in the Community, 14(3), May 2006, pp.242-253.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell

This paper's aims are to (1) describe the development of a new indicator of mental health needs, (2) use the index to explain variations in social services expenditure on mental health, and (3) compare the index with other established measures of need. A principal components analysis of sociodemographic variables considered to be indicators of need was used to produce four distinct factors for 148 Local Authority areas in England. A weighted sum of these factors was used to produce a single index. (Weights were the proportion of variance explained by each factor.) The index was used in a regression model to explain variations in spending on mental health care and was compared with (1) a model containing the four individual factors, (2) the current method of allocating resources, (3) the index used to allocate resources to primary care trusts, (4) the Mental Illness Needs Index (MINI), (5) four indices of deprivation produced by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, and (6) the average of the above four indices. The new index could explain 54% of variation, compared with 56% using the current method. The four-factor model could explain 66%, whilst the other models could explain between 37% and 20%. This new index has the advantage that it is not based on previous levels of utilisation or expenditure and yet still explains a comparable amount of variation as the current method. However, a disaggregated model containing individual factors may be preferable.

Journal article

The Camberwell Assessment of Need: comparison of assessments by staff and patients in an inner-city and a semi-rural community area

Authors:
NAJIM Hellme, McCRONE Paul
Journal article citation:
Psychiatric Bulletin, 29(1), January 2005, pp.13-17.
Publisher:
Royal College of Psychiatrists

The aim of the study was to examine the association between the assessment of need by staff and by severely mentally ill patients using the Camberwell Assessment of Need in a semi-rural setting (Maidstone, n=50) and an inner-city area (Camberwell, n=127). Staff and patients were interviewed separately. We specifically examined differences in the total number of needs between Camberwell and Maidstone, differences in the number of unmet needs and differences in the level of agreement between staff and service users. Patients in Maidstone had fewer needs than those in Camberwell according to both staff (4.9 v. 5.8) and patients (4.2 v. 6.3), fewer unmet needs rated (staff, 1.1 v.1.5; patients, 1.0 v.1.9) and a greater level of concordance between staff and patients. The needs of severely mentally ill patients were greater in the innercity area compared with the semi-rural one. The fact that agreement between staff and service users was less in the inner-city area also suggests that more stable staff-patient relationships existed in the rural area.

Book Full text available online for free

Independent and able to cope: evaluation of Working Together in London; an integrated mental health initiative

Authors:
LEE John, McCRONE Paul, FORD Richard
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health,|King's Fund
Publication year:
2002
Pagination:
66p.
Place of publication:
London

This report is an evaluation of the 'Working Together in London project', set up by the Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health, the King's Fund and the DoH to support people with severe and long term mental health problems. This project examined the work of three assertive outreach teams in the capital. The full report of this project, draws out the key lessons for health and social care professionals, and offers guidance on how to put assertive outreach into practice.

Journal article

Credit where credit's due

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, THORNICROFT Graham
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 18.9.97, 1997, p.23.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Many people with mental health problems do not claim their full entitlement to benefits. The authors explain how computerised assessment helped identify the problem.

Book Full text available online for free

Economic evaluation of early intervention (EI) services: phase IV report

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, PARK A-La, KNAPP Martin
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
22p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Using a 2006 model adapted during 3 previous research phases, Phase IV focuses on the economic impacts of early intervention services (EI) on vocational and employment outcomes of people with mental health problems, including psychoses, in the UK. The report also covers long-term outcomes of EI and the impact on costs associated with suicide and murder. Four findings are discussed. Firstly, EI reduced NHS health care, and wages costs of employment lost to mental health problems, with employment rates of 36% and 27% attributed to those in EI and standard care (SC), respectively. Costs of homicide are low, say these authors, with annual costs per person at £6 for those in EI compared with £80 for SC. Thirdly, suicide is estimated to occur in 1.3% EI and 4% SC patients, equating to annual savings of £957 per person. Finally, long-term outcomes associated with EI are dependent on readmission rates following EI discharge. They equate to costs savings of £36,632 over 8 years if rates remain constant. If rates gradually or immediately converge expected savings dip to £27,029 and £17,427, respectively. The increased work and decreased homicides and suicides recorded here reinforce earlier work that EI is beneficial to the UK’s mental health.

Key to icons

  • Free resource Free resource
  • Journal article Journal article
  • Book Book
  • Digital media Digital media
  • Journal Journal

Give us your feedback

Social Care Online continues to be developed in response to user feedback.

Contact us with your comments and for any problems using the website.

Sign up/login for more

Register/login to use standard search filters, access resource links, advanced search and email alerts