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Journal article Full text available online for free

Positive responses to need

Author:
KNAPP Martin
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 28.10.10, 2010, p.30.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Briefly reports on the findings of recent mental health research. Research covering debt and mental health; and links between mental health and ethnicity.

Book

Economics, mental health and policy: an overview

Authors:
KNAPP Martin, et al
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2008
Pagination:
41p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
London

This report summarises findings presented at Mental Health Economics European Network events in London and Brussels in September and December 2007. It highlights funding issues, assesses the merits of the case for investment in promotion and prevention, looks at how economic incentives might influence the balance of care, reflects on some implications of poor mental health for employment and productivity, focuses on further development of the European Service Mapping Schedule and, as an example, considers the challenges to be faced in two  countries, Turkey and Hungary, currently undergoing rapid economic and social transition.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health promotion and mental illness prevention: the economic case

Editors:
KNAPP Martin, MCDAID David, PARSONAGE Michael, (eds.)
Publisher:
Great Britain. Department of Health
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
43p.
Place of publication:
London

Mental ill health is the largest single cause of disability in the UK, contributing almost 23% of the overall burden of disease compared to about 16% each for cancer and cardiovascular disease. The economic and social costs of mental health problems in England are estimated at around £105 billion each year. This report presents the key findings of a project on the economic case for mental health promotion and prevention, based on a detailed analysis of costs and benefits for fifteen different interventions. The interventions were: health visiting and reducing post-natal depression; parenting interventions for children with persistent conduct disorders; school-based social and emotional learning programmes to prevent conduct problems in childhood; school-based interventions to reduce bullying; early detection for psychosis; early intervention for psychosis; screening and brief intervention in primary care for alcohol misuse; workplace screening for depression and anxiety disorders; promoting well-being in the workplace; debt and mental health; population-level suicide awareness training and intervention; bridge safety measures for suicide prevention; collaborative care for depression in individuals with Type II diabetes; tackling medically unexplained symptoms; and befriending of older adults. The estimated economic pay-offs per £ of expenditure from each of these fifteen models is presented.

Journal article

Costs and outcomes management in supported housing

Authors:
JARBRINK Krister, HALLAM Angela, KNAPP Martin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 10(1), February 2001, pp.99-198.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Providers of housing engage with a variety of care needs among vulnerable mixed populations. This study aims to examine the relationship between the levels of care and support provided, on the one hand, and tenants' characteristics, needs and living environment, on the other. The costs of providing housing and the costs of services used by tenants independently of their accommodation arrangements are also explored in the context of assessed needs and characteristics.

Journal article

Costs of mental illness in England

Authors:
PATEL Anita, KNAPP Martin
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Research Review, 5, May 1998, pp.4-10.
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit

Discusses how each year, one in four adults will experience some form of mental health problem, and prevalence rate as high as this is likely to have enormous economic implications. In a small research study carried out at Centre for the Economics of Mental Health CEMH last year the authors tried to put some figures on the economic implications of mental illness. Describe the results and the methods that underpin them.

Book

Community psychiatric nurses in an intensive community support team: comparisons with generic CPN care

Authors:
McCRONE Paul, BEECHAM Jeni, KNAPP Martin
Publisher:
University of Kent. Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
1993
Pagination:
13p.,tables.
Place of publication:
Canterbury

Research paper looking at the reorganised community psychiatric nursing service in Greenwich, where individual staff act as case managers and client advocates, and compares it with the standard organisation of generic CPN services. This paper focuses on service utilisation and cost.

Book Full text available online for free

Commissioning cost-effective services for promotion of mental health and wellbeing and prevention of mental ill-health

Authors:
PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES RESEARCH UNIT, MCDAID David, WILSON Emma, KNAPP Martin
Publisher:
Public Health England
Publication year:
2017
Pagination:
105
Place of publication:
London

Building on earlier work carried out by the PSSRU in 2011, this report summarises the findings of modelling work to estimate cost effectiveness of a number of different interventions which can help reduce the risk mental health problems and promote good mental health and wellbeing. The interventions examined are: school based programmes to prevent bullying and initiatives to prevent depression in children and young people; workplace programmes to promote mental health; mental health support and interventions for people with long term physical health problems; group based social activities, including volunteering, to address loneliness as a way of promoting mental health; financial advice services for people with debt problems located in primary care; and initiatives to identify and support people who have self-harmed and are potentially suicidal. The report identifies which sectors are likely to pay for each of the eight interventions (eg health, education, employers), and the potential costs that can be avoided. It also notes the potential for achieving cashable savings or a freeing up resources for alternative uses. The report is one of a set of resources to support local commissioners in designing and implementing mental health and wellbeing support services. (Edited publisher abstract)

Book Full text available online for free

Youth mental health: new economic evidence

Authors:
KNAPP Martin, et al
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2016
Pagination:
117
Place of publication:
London

Examines the economic challenges of youth mental health problems in England, focusing on adolescents and young adults. The report summarise findings from a review of the international evidence on the economic impact of youth mental health services, an analysis of the economic implications of youth mental health problems – including the failure to recognise or treat them – and an evaluation of two models of youth mental health service provision in England. The report found that for young people aged 12–15 at baseline assessment (aged 15–18 by the end of the follow-up period), mental health-related average costs over the three-year follow-up period totalled £1,778 a year. In addition, the report shows that young people aged 16 to 25 with mental health issues at baseline are significantly more likely not to be in employment, education or training (NEET) than those without such issues. Among the group with mental health issues, those in contact with services are much more likely to be receiving benefits. A key theme emerging from the research is the substantial unmet need for services for young people with mental health problems - the treatment gap has been known for at least two decades and this study identifies treatment gaps dating from 1999. Tentative findings suggest that local specialist youth mental health services can generate significant improvements in mental health, employment, education and training outcomes. Contacts with services such as emergency and inpatient hospital care and the criminal justice system can also be reduced. (Edited publisher abstract)

Journal article

Mental health, poverty and development

Authors:
FUNK Michelle, DREW Natalie, KNAPP Martin
Journal article citation:
Journal of Public Mental Health, 11(4), 2012, pp.166-185.
Publisher:
Emerald

It is estimated that 80% of people suffering from mental health disorders live in low or middle income countries (LMICs). The poor are, in general, disproportionately affected by mental health problems. This paper, which builds on the findings of WHO's Report on Mental Health and Development, aims to highlight the health, social, economic, and human rights effects of unaddressed mental disorders in LMICs. The authors also propose effective strategies to address mental disorders and their impacts as part of an overall development strategy. The paper begins with a review of the research on mental disorders and poverty. There is evidence of strong links between poverty and mental disorder, supporting the argument that mental disorders should be an important concern for development strategies. Mental disorders have diverse and far-reaching social impacts, including homelessness, higher rates of imprisonment, poor educational opportunities and outcomes, lack of employment and reduced income. The authors suggest that targeted poverty alleviation programmes are needed to break the cycle between mental illness and poverty. These must include measures specifically addressing the needs of people with mental health conditions, such as the provision of accessible and effective services and support, facilitation of education, employment opportunities and housing, and enforcement of human rights protection.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health promotion and prevention: the economic case

Authors:
KNAPP Martin, MCDAID David, PARSONAGE Michael, (eds.)
Publisher:
Personal Social Services Research Unit
Publication year:
2011
Pagination:
43p.
Place of publication:
London

Health care systems are designed to improve health and health-related well-being, but are always constrained by the resources available to them. They also need to be aware of the resources available in adjacent systems which can have such an impact on health, such as housing, employment and education. Careful choices therefore have to be made about how to utilise what is available. One immediate consequence is to ask whether investment in the prevention of mental health needs and the promotion of mental wellbeing might represent a good use of available resources. This report identifies and analyses the costs and economic pay-offs of a range of interventions in the area of mental health promotion, prevention and early intervention, and to present this information in a way that would most helpfully support NHS and other commissioners in assessing the case for investment.

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