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Journal article Full text available online for free

The support networks of people with severe, long-term mental health problems

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, et al
Journal article citation:
Practice: Social Work in Action, 6(1), 1992, pp.25-40.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Examines the areas of relationships and professional support to mental health service users with severe, long-term mental health problems. The tenuous nature of support available to many service users both in the community and in staffed settings is identified, and it is argued that for real improvements in quality of life, the newly-emerging care manager role will need to address explicitly the relationship environment of people with such problems.

Journal article

A neglected power

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, EVANS Sherrill, SHAW Jenny
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 9.9.99, 1999, pp.24-25.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

Mental health professionals in England and Wales make only limited use of the guardianship provisions of the Mental Health Act 1983. The authors consider whether the use of these powers in the United States holds any lessons for this country.

Journal article

The mental health of residents of approved premises in the Greater Manchester probation area: a cohort study

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, et al
Journal article citation:
Probation Journal, 51(2), June 2004, pp.101-115.
Publisher:
Sage

Reports on a 12 month cohort study of mental disorder among residents of approved premises within the Greater Manchester probation area which had contracted psychiatric support via the local NHS Trust. Generally high rates of mental health problems were identified, particularly at the premises with psychiatric support and the women's premises, and also among bailees across all premises. Not all of those with mental health problems were receiving mental health services. Implications for service development within the probation service and alongside health and social care agencies are considered.

Journal article

Emergency referrals to an acute psychiatric service: demographic social and clinical characteristics and comparisons with those receiving continuing services

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, SPURRELL Mark, PERRY Amanda
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 9(3), June 2000, pp.305-317.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

The characteristics of individuals referred to psychiatric emergency services serve as one indicator of the functioning of the service system as a whole. A two-month cohort of emergency referrals is described and comparisons made with a Community Mental Health Team (CMHT) caseload group. The characteristics of the individual, dimensions of the crisis, and the outcome of the emergency assessment were recorded in each case. The study raises the issue of whether prioritising of specialist mental health services to those with severe and enduring mental illness serves to exclude other vulnerable groups. Whilst most individuals in the study had a history of episodic psychiatric contact, many would be likely to satisfy the criteria for continuing support. Some may only have transient needs related to the life crisis; for others with more chronic difficulties, an emergency response alone cannot be expected to make an impact.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Women, men and the Mental Health Act (1983)

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, MOHAMAD Hadi
Journal article citation:
Research Policy and Planning, 12(3), 1994, pp.6-10.
Publisher:
Social Services Research Group

Reports on the findings of a project which collects data continuously about individuals assessed within the framework of the 1983 Mental Health Act, with a view to their detention in psychiatric hospital. Data is included from five Local Authorities for the years 1990, 1991, 1992 and 1993, collected by Approved Social Workers who have a key role in assessing the social circumstances and making appropriate application for detention under the Act. The focus of this paper is the differences between men and women in the application of the Act. Some key differences are identified, which are compared with earlier research. Implications for policy and practice are reviewed.

Journal article

Accommodation and employment: a survey into the circumstances and expressed needs of users of mental health services in a northern town

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, et al
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 22(1), 1992, pp.61-73.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Interviews with service users with severe and long-term conditions revealed their greatest needs to be in the area of housing and employment.

Journal article

Powers to detain under mental health legislation in England and the role of the Approved Social Worker: an analysis of patterns and trends under the 1983 Mental Health Act in six local authorities

Author:
HATFIELD Barbara
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 38(8), December 2008, pp.1553-1571.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

The study reported makes use of an existing database in order to examine a group of individuals assessed by approved social workers (ASWs) under the Mental Health Act, with a view to detention in psychiatric hospital. The study aims to develop a profile of these individuals, their pathways to assessment and the outcome of the assessments, and to examine the social implications of the findings. The study also seeks to identify changes over a nine-year period. The role of the ASW is reviewed in the light of the analysis of the nine-year information. Key features in the social situations of individuals are identified that may be associated with mental health need. Specific aspects of gender and life-stage vulnerability are suggested, as are poor material resources, isolation and lifestyle issues such as drug and alcohol misuse. The close association of psychiatric severity and social disadvantage is evident, presenting assessing ASWs with challenging and complex assessments. Mental health social workers are uniquely equipped to identify issues in the social context that may contribute to mental health crisis. Interventions underpinned by social approaches, including social inclusion and the recovery model, have the potential to help provide services in the longer term that provide social support and minimize the need for crisis admission.

Journal article

Mental health training needs amongst staff of Probation Approved Premises: a comparison with mental health hostel staff in the voluntary sector

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, et al
Journal article citation:
Probation Journal, 52(2), June 2005, pp.137-152.
Publisher:
Sage

The recognition of significant levels of mental health need amongst people in contact with the criminal justice system has led to many new areas of partnership working between mental health and the criminal justice system. The training needs of staff within the criminal justice system in England and Wales is recognized as an important area for service development and has to date been largely unexplored. This article examines many of the issues as identified when comparing the mental health training needs and experiences of staff working in two forms of residential service - Probation Approved Premises and voluntary sector mental health services.

Journal article

Detention under the Mental Health Act: balancing rights, risks and needs for services

Authors:
HATFIELD Barbara, ANTCLIFF Valerie
Journal article citation:
Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law, 23(2), May 2001, pp.135-153.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Place of publication:
Philadelphia, USA

Article identifies that increasing rates of detention through the 1990s in a particular region , disproportionately involve longer-term detentions (under section 3), men, and people with serious mental illnesses. Those detained are likely to experience social difficulties. Changes in legislation are imminent, and the article concludes that thought should be given to the amount of statutory intervention in the lives of seriously mentally ill people, and to the principle of reciprocity in relation to those coerced for lesser periods. Argues that services should seek to address the issues of social exclusion which are reflected in the circumstances of those detained.

Journal article

The Care Programme Approach: dimensions of evaluation

Authors:
DOWNING Angela, HATFIELD Barbara
Journal article citation:
British Journal of Social Work, 29(6), December 1999, pp.841-860.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press

Describes a study that examined the first six months of implementation of the Care Programme Approach (CPA) at a psychiatric unit of a district general hospital. From an analysis of the research literature on case management, and from current policy, a framework was developed which was used to analyse the implementation under study. The objectives were to ensure continuity of care and reduce hospital admission amongst people with severe and enduring mental health problems. The study shows that most of these features were achieved in the implementation, although there was no evidence that hospital admissions were avoided. A number of factors were found to be associated with re-admission, and these are discussed in the light of the findings of other studies.

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