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Book

New thinking about mental health and employment

Authors:
GROVE Bob, SECKER Jenny, SEEBOHM Patience, (eds)
Publisher:
Radcliffe
Publication year:
2005
Pagination:
162p.
Place of publication:
Abingdon

Until recently it has been assumed that people who experience severe and enduring mental health problems are unable to work, unless or until they recover. That assumption is now being challenged by international research demonstrating that, with the right support, people can succeed in finding and keeping a job even when they continue to need support from mental health services. This book draws together the research undertaken to date and combines it with mental health service users’ perspectives on the workplace to validate key points.

Journal article

Sealing a New Deal for mental health

Author:
GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 26.11.98, 1998, p.13.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

The author argues that the New Deal cannot transform the working lives of mentally ill people in its present form.

Journal article Full text available online for free

Qualitative evaluation of a job retention pilot for people with mental health problems

Authors:
THOMAS Kristina, SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
British Journal of General Practice, 55(516), July 2005, pp.546-547.
Publisher:
Royal College of General Practitioners

Interviews with job retention clients, their employers and case managers were carried out. A group interview with GPs was also conducted. Client-focused interventions were reported to be helpful by clients and GPs and employer -focused interventions were appreciated by both clients and employers. All clients attributed positive outcomes to the service. In conclusion, these preliminary results support the further development and evaluation of job retention services.

Journal article

Working all together

Authors:
THOMAS Tina, SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2004, pp.30-33.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Job retention schemes have an essential role in a recovery orientated mental health service. This article looks at a job retention team (JRT) based in Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership Trust (AWMHTP). The JRT operates on a case management model, and offers a free service to people in employment currently experiencing mental health problems and at a risk of loosing their jobs as a result. The ultimate aim of the pilot is to develop a model for job retention services across the UK. Summarises findings from a qualitative evaluation of the project's first year of operation, from June 2002 to May 2003. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 of the 29 clients with whom the JRT had worked over the 12 months, 5 of their employers, 6 of their GPs and 2 case managers.

Journal article

The government's new employment agenda: implications for mental health service managers

Author:
GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
Managing Community Care, 6(5), October 1998, pp.193-199.
Publisher:
Pavilion

This article proposes a new engagement between mental health services and the social inclusion and employment agendas that are a core part of the government's programme. Initiatives such as Welfare to Work, New Deal and Health Action Zones are explained, and suggestions are made about some of the opportunities they present for improving mental health services and the lives of service users.

Book Full text available online for free

Beyond the gate: securing employment for offenders with mental health problems

Authors:
LOCKETT Helen, GROVE Bob
Publisher:
Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
11p.
Place of publication:
London

For people with a history of offending, one of the most effective ways of preventing reoffending and improving their chances of leading a better life is likely to be finding and keeping a job. However, only a small proportion of prisoners in England have jobs to go to on release and employment support offered in the criminal justice system is too often denied to offenders with mental health problems. This briefing paper considers how to support people with mental health problems and offending histories into mainstream employment. Over the last 18 months, Centre for Mental Health has visited prisons, probation services and other sites across the country to find examples of where offenders with mental health problems are being supported into paid work. The evidence from this has been used to produce a set of five key elements of effective practice. These are: employers should play an instrumental role in creating and developing opportunities; recruitment needs to be pragmatic, on the basis of attitude and ‘character’ rather than qualifications or health status; support should be offered to employees and their managers for as long as they need it; opportunities for ‘pre-employment’ and ‘in work’ skills development should be linked to realistic employment opportunities; and criminal justice and other statutory agencies should facilitate effective pathways and access to real work and appropriate skills development while offenders are in the criminal justice system.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and employment: key opportunities to put policy into practice

Authors:
BACON Jenni, GROVE Bob, LOCKETT Helen
Publisher:
Sainsbury Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2010
Pagination:
4p.
Place of publication:
London

Following the publication of much new policy in December 2009, this paper aims to make sense of what all the policy means in practice and picks out the key commitments and opportunities. It describes how healthy workplaces are key to the Government’s public health approach which runs through both Working our Way to Better Health and New Horizons. The report outlines the importance of keeping people in work, and noted that preventing people from falling out of work because of mental health problems depends on intervening quickly when things go wrong, for example when people don’t return to work after sickness absence as expected. Ensuring that relationships between employer and employee don’t break down is crucial. A section on overcoming individual barriers to employment states that running through all the new policy is a focus on coordinated, individualised support for people wishing to gain employment or get back to work. This reports emphasises that employment should be at the heart of the ‘recovery vision’ for mental health services generally. The paper concludes that there have been more developments in mental health and employment policy in recent months than at any time in the last decade. There may be more to come.

Journal article

What have we learnt about mental health and employment?

Authors:
SECKER Jenny, GROVE Bob, SEEBOHM Patience
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Review, 11(1), 2006, pp.8-15.
Publisher:
Pier Professional

This article examines the evidence regarding who can benefit from vocational interventions, service users' motivation to work, how people can be helped to find and keep a job and how unemployment can be prevented in the first place. The authors then look at practice evidence to show how effective services aimed at supporting service users to return or retain contact with the labour market can be developed.

Journal article

Writing the 'user chapter'

Author:
GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
A Life in the Day, 3(2), May 1999, pp.20-24.
Publisher:
Emerald

Increasingly users of mental health services are asked to give up their time to represent the 'user perspective'. Whether this is an opportunity or an imposition is debatable - it can be daunting and at the same time exhilarating. Presents a users perspective of the experience and provides some guidelines for good practice.

Journal article

Mental health and employment: shaping a new agenda

Author:
GROVE Bob
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health, 8(2), April 1999, pp.131-140.
Publisher:
Informa Healthcare
Place of publication:
London

Examines the principles which should underpin mental health employment services and suggests that they should be viewed through the conceptual framework of the social model of disability. Proposes a framework for a locality service constellation which focuses upon support into open employment and job creation measures.

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