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Mental health, families and carers

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

There can often be a gap between the service provision for adults with mental health problems and services provided for children. As a result parenting and family issues are not always given the attention they deserve.

Book Full text available online for free

Count me in: making life better for people with mental health problems: an easy read version of the Social Exclusion Unit report

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
9p.
Place of publication:
London

An easy to read version of the Social Exclusion Unit’s report on mental health. It was put together with the help of Mencap and outlines in easy to understand language what the report is about, explains some of the key terms such as ‘social exclusion’ and sets out some of the main action points from the report.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and criminal justice

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

Between 2003 and 2004, there were 93 suicides (known as self-inflicted deaths) in prison. People with mental health problems are more likely to be the victims rather than the perpetrators of violence: a study of people with psychosis in British inner-city areas reported that 16 per cent had been the victims of violence, compared with about 7 per cent of the inner-city population overall.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, advice and financial services

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
6p.
Place of publication:
London

Financial problems are the most frequently cited cause of depression, but they an also be a consequence of mental health problems. People with mental health problems are nearly three times as likely to be in debt as those without mental health problems.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and ethnicity

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

Addressed to people from ethnic minority communities affected by mental health problems, all those providing services for these groups, including primary care and voluntary sector staff, education, housing, employment and advice services.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and welfare benefits

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

The number of people claiming Incapacity Benefit for mental health reasons has almost doubled in ten years, from 475,000 in 1995 to 848,000 in 2004. Employment tends to lead to improvements in people’s mental health; inactivity is associated with worsening mental health. Many people with mental health problems have said they lack advice about claiming benefits, and find the current system confusing. This can lead to people running up debts, as they do not claim the benefits to which they are entitled.

Book Full text available online for free

The role of health and social care professionals in promoting social inclusion

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

GPs issue sickness certificates when they assess that a person cannot perform their usual work. Mental health problems are more likely to be listed on sickness certificates in the most deprived areas of the country. What people with mental health problems are told by doctors and other health professionals can have a major impact on their confidence and their aspirations for the future. For many people with mental health problems, the concept of ‘waiting to get well enough’ is not a helpful one, as inactivity is strongly associated with worsening mental health. It is important to ensure appropriate pathways of care between primary and secondary services; up to 28 per cent of referrals from primary care to specialist services are inappropriate. The range of services is more limited in rural areas, with specialist services often absent. Adults with complex needs, such as substance misuse in addition to their mental health problems, often struggle to get their needs met by statutory services.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and housing

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

Over four out of five people with severe mental health problems live in mainstream housing, with the rest living in supported housing or other specialist accommodation. Half of those with their own home or tenancy live alone. Many people with mental health problems feel that they are not offered the same choices as other people when seeking a new home, and that they are frequently obliged to take hard to let properties. People with mental health problems are one-and-a-half times more likely than the general population to live in rented housing, with higher uncertainty about how long they can remain in their current home. Mental health problems are prevalent among homeless people with 30 to 50 per cent of rough sleepers having mental health problems, and as many as one in five homeless people having a mental health problem and a further issue such as substance misuse.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, education and training

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
8p.
Place of publication:
London

People with low levels of educational achievement are likely to have less income and be less healthy overall. Among people with common mental health problems, just under one in three have no qualifications, and only one-third have qualifications at GCSE level equivalent. Only a small proportion of higher education students with mental healthrelated disabilities currently receives Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs). The proportion of students in an institution receiving DSAs varies from 0-14 per cent. Involvement in learning can have a positive effect on someone’s mental health. In addition to acquiring new skills, learning can promote confidence and give people a greater sense of purpose. It allows people to meet other students and make new friends, and to access better jobs and housing.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health and social exclusion: Social Exclusion Unit report

Author:
GREAT BRITAIN. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publisher:
Great Britain. Office of the Deputy Prime Minister. Social Exclusion Unit
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
144p.
Place of publication:
London

This report marks the start of a sustained programme of change to challenge discriminatory attitudes and significantly improve opportunities and outcomes for adults with mental health problems. This will mean people with mental health problems regaining hope and recovering control of their lives, whatever their diagnosis or ongoing symptoms. Government has an important role to play, but the active involvement of the voluntary and community sector,employers and, crucially, people with personal experience of mental health problems will be essential to achieve real change. The report features case studies of many successful local projects and the experiences of individuals who have overcome the challenges posed by mental health problems to lead fulfilling lives. These examples demonstrate what can be achieved and the benefits that result for individuals and society.

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