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Developing social prescribing and community referrals for mental health in Scotland

Authors:
FRIEDLI Lynne, et al
Publisher:
Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
97p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report was commissioned from the Scottish Development Centre for Mental Health (SDC) by the Scottish Government’s National Programme for Improving Mental Health and Wellbeing, to address the role and potential contribution of social prescribing or community referral in two principal areas of concern in mental health: effective identification and response to people with common mental health problems presenting in primary care, and the role of primary care in supporting people with long term mental health problems. The aim of this report is to provide information that could inform the future development, commissioning and design of social prescribing or community referral programmes in Scotland.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health improvement: evidence based messages to promote mental wellbeing

Authors:
FRIEDLI Lynne, et al
Publisher:
NHS Health Scotland
Publication year:
2007
Pagination:
85p.
Place of publication:
Edinburgh

This report was commissioned by NHS Health Scotland to assess the strength of the evidence for mental health improvement messages and to establish the views of the public and professionals on what are sometimes referred to as ‘positive steps’ for mental health. These include: keeping physically active, eating well, drinking in moderation, learning new skills, creativity, spirituality, relaxing, valuing yourself and others, talking about your feelings, social networks, caring, making a contribution and asking for help. The findings presented in this report are drawn from a review of the literature on the effectiveness of mental health improvement messages, qualitative research, including grey literature, from campaigns and other initiatives to promote mental health messages, an online survey and telephone interviews with BT employees, one to one telephone interviews with colleagues in Scotland and the rest of the UK with experience of mental health improvement in a range of settings, and feedback from practitioners at a consultation seminar held in Edinburgh to discuss emerging findings. Findings from the review show that, although the quality and quantity of studies vary, overall there is good evidence to support the effectiveness of positive steps messages for the promotion of positive mental health, the prevention of some mental health problems and for improving quality of life for people living with mental health problems.

Journal article

Promotion drive

Author:
FRIEDLI Lynne
Journal article citation:
Community Care, 3.5.01, 2001, pp.26-27.
Publisher:
Reed Business Information

After years of neglect, mental health promotion has achieved new status as a strategic priority. Looks forward to a greater commitment from local agencies to making people happy.

Journal article

Beyond Prevention

Author:
FRIEDLI Lynne
Journal article citation:
Mental Health and Learning Disabilities Care, 3(10), June 2000, p.328.
Publisher:
Pavilion

Describes the means by which Standard One of the National Service Framework gives priority to mental health promotion.

Journal article

A matter of faith: religion and mental health

Author:
FRIEDLI Lynne
Journal article citation:
International Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 2(2), May 2000, pp.7-13.
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis

Religion and mental health are not easy issues to address within the same framework. The unstable boundary between symptoms of psychosis and some forms of religious inspiration is only one element in a complex debate about the relationship between spirituality and mental health. Looks at how the growing evidence of the significance of religious belief to people with mental health problems is raising important questions about the role of spirituality in mental health promotion, the relationship between mental health service providers and spiritual leaders and the attitudes of faith communities to mental health issues.

Book Full text available online for free

Promoting mental health and preventing mental illness: the economic case for investment in Wales

Authors:
FRIEDLI Lynne, PARSONAGE Michael
Publisher:
All Wales Mental Health Promotion Network
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
88p.
Place of publication:
Cardiff

This report highlights how mental illnesses can often occur early in life and persist throughout adulthood. It recommends early interventions such as supporting parents and children in their early years, and support for lifelong learning, improving working lives and investing in positive steps for mental health are also recommended. This report estimates the overall cost of mental health problems in Wales at £7.2 billion a year. This total includes the cost of health and social care provided for people with mental health problems, the costs of output losses in the Welsh economy are included, and an estimate of the human costs of mental health problems representing their impact on quality of life. This report recommends investment in mental health promotion against a provisional list of value for money programmes, and includes supporting parents and early years parenting skills, training/pre-school education/home learning environment, supporting lifelong learning, health promoting schools and continuing education, improving working lives such as employment/workplace, positive steps for mental health like lifestyle (diet, exercise, sensible drinking) and social support, and supporting communities via environmental improvements. These areas of intervention appear to offer the most favourable balance of effectiveness, scale of potential benefit and likely cost of implementation. These demonstrate that all sectors have a role to play in improving mental health; the need for interventions that involve individuals and communities and those that tackle structural barriers to mental health and wellbeing.

Book Full text available online for free

Mental health, resilience and inequalities

Author:
FRIEDLI Lynne
Publisher:
World Health Organization. Regional Office for Europe
Publication year:
2009
Pagination:
55p., bibliog.
Place of publication:
Copenhagen

This report aims to demonstrate how poor mental health is a significant cause of wider social and health problems, including: low levels of educational achievement and work productivity; higher levels of physical disease and mortality; violence, relationship breakdown and poor community cohesion. In contrast, good mental health leads to better physical health, healthier lifestyles, improved productivity and educational attainment and lower levels of crime and violence. The report draws together international research across a range of disciplines and highlights the importance of policies and programmes to support improved mental health for the whole population. Possible policy interventions are suggested in the areas of: supporting family life; education to better equip children economically and emotionally; employment opportunities and conditions that promote good mental health; partnership between health and other sectors to address problems that can lead to mental health problems; and reducing barriers to social contact.

Book

Social prescribing for mental health: briefing paper

Authors:
FRIEDLI Lynne, WATSON Stuart
Publisher:
Northern Centre for Mental Health
Publication year:
2004
Pagination:
56p.
Place of publication:
Durham

Social prescribing is a mechanism for linking patients in primary care with community servivces and care. This report aims to demonstrate opportunities for linking mental health promotion to the broader public health and regeneration agenda, and, extending the commitment to mental health promotion across the system. There is a need to make the case for the added value of mental health promotion to the Modernisation Boards within the NHS, and to a wide variety of other stakeholders. It will require a strategic approach with local authority responsibility for economic and social wellbeing, and the increase in education about citizenship.

Journal article

Prescriptions for pleasure

Authors:
BROWN Martin, FRIEDLI Lynne, WATSON Stuart
Journal article citation:
Mental Health Today, June 2004, pp.20-23.
Publisher:
Pavilion
Place of publication:
Hove

Social prescribing links patients in primary care with non-medical sources of support within the community. It is part of a wider recognition of the influence of social and cultural factors on mental health outcomes. This article is based on a new evidence review commissioned by the Northern Centre for Mental Health to support the wider use of social prescribing in primary care to achieve more positive outcomes for vulnerable client groups, including people with mild to moderate depression and anxiety and people with long term difficulties. Highlights some evaluated models of social prescribing and looks at their success.

Journal article

A question of money: the Hats Off campaign

Author:
FRIEDLI Lynne
Journal article citation:
Journal of Mental Health Promotion, 1(4), December 2002, pp.32-34.
Publisher:
Pavilion

The past decade has seen a wide range of campaigns worldwide devoted to challenging the stigma surrounding mental health issues and attempting to change public attitudes and behaviour. Such campaigns are notoriously difficult to evaluate and have also been criticised for failing to address the structural causes and sources of discrimination against people with mental health problems. In response to some of these problems, Mentality's 'Hats Off' campaign adopted a traditional fundraising strategy, based on the hypothesis that, like any other marginalised group, the user/survivor movement is best placed to define and achieve its own empowerment and, with adequate resources, can do so.

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